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Courses Offered

BIOL 101 OUR BIOLOGICAL WORLD (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Study of biology as it relates to humans and their environment, with special emphasis on ecological interrelationships, evolution and genetics, and topics of current importance. Recommended for non-science majors to fulfill laboratory science transfer requirement. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 110 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Using natural selection and physiological survival as a unifying theme, this course deals with the basic problems common to all living systems, and compares the functional solution that various organisms have evolved, illuminating the unity in diversity that characterizes life on earth. Recommended for non-science majors to fulfill laboratory science transfer requirement. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 111 NATURAL HISTORY OF CALIFORNIA (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab with frequent field trips. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Students will investigate the functioning of ecosystems, adaptations of organisms to their environment and natural history of selected organisms. Students will become familiar with natural ecosystems of California, with a primary focus on the San Francisco Bay Area. Laboratory and field investigations will be conducted using the scientific method; critical thinking skills will be emphasized. Recommended for non-science majors to fulfill laboratory science transfer requirements. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 130 HUMAN BIOLOGY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Designed to provide students with an appreciation of the structure, function, and development of their own bodies. Topics include an introduction to science and scientific methods of investigation and some elementary chemistry (no previous background necessary) as a basis for understanding human functions such as digestion, circulation, reproduction, heredity, evolution, human ecological roles and other systems. Some diseases and other causes of body malfunction are discussed. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2).
BIOL 140 ANIMALS, PEOPLE AND ENVIRONMENT (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
This course will familiarize the student with the methods and importance of behavioral investigation in animals. Emphasis on past and current human-animal relationships, the impact on animal populations and increasing need for wildlife protection. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2).

BIOL 145 PLANTS, PEOPLE AND ENVIRONMENT (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A survey of plants emphasizing those aspects of plant biology that have affected the lives of people. Topics include: the success and failure of modern agriculture; the impact of humans on the environment; and the importance of plants in solving critical problems of hunger and conservation of energy. Attention is given to modes of inquiry or ways in which scientists carry out their investigations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2).

BIOL 150 INTRODUCTION TO MARINE BIOLOGY (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A non-technical introduction to the scientific method used in studies of marine biology. Major emphasis is given to the natural history of marine animals and plants and their relationship with the oceanic environment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2).

BIOL 170 PRINCIPLES OF APPLIED BIOSCIENCE (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A survey of the principles that govern the living world, from molecules to cells and tissues, to organs and whole organisms, to populations and ecosystems, to the entire biosphere. Special emphasis is placed upon experimental approaches, current issues, and practical application of the scientific method and biological principles to issues affecting public health, agriculture, and socioeconomic change. Current news and developments in relevant areas of biological sciences and biotechnology will be reviewed and discussed. Also listed as BTEC 170. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2).

BIOL 171 LABORATORY PRINCIPLES OF APPLIED BIOSCIENCE (1)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lab. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 170. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
The laboratory introduces students to practical methods in preparing materials, reagents and media for conducting biological investigations and products of genetic engineering. Students will learn to measure and prepare solutions of various concentrations and pH, how to use basic chemistry and biological instrumentation such as digital scales, pipettes and micropipettes, centrifuges, and vertical and horizontal electrophoresis apparatuses. Students will plan and conduct biological experiments using the scientific method and employing modern laboratory methods and instrumentation. Data will be analyzed using spreadsheet software for tabulation and graphing. Teamwork, responsible lab technique, and proper and thorough notebook keeping will be emphasized. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B3).

BIOL 215 ORGANISMAL BIOLOGY: CORE I (5)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/96-108 lab/16-18 hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: MATH 120 or MATH 123, or appropriate math placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
As part of a two-course core program, BIOL 215 is an introductory survey of organismal form and function. Analysis of fundamental biological functions including nutrition, gas exchange, reproduction, natural selection, and ecology using representative living organisms. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 230 INTRODUCTION TO CELL BIOLOGY: CORE II (5)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/96-108 lab/16-18 hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CHEM 210; and BIOL 210 (College of San Mateo), or 215, or 220 (College of San Mateo), or 225 (Ca?ada College).Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An introduction to life functions as seen at the cellular level; cellular structure, macromolecular architecture and function, cellular energetics, chemical regulation, photochemical activities, molecular genetics, and genetic engineering. The second course in the two-course Biology core sequence. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 240 GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY (4)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab/16-18 hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a college-level laboratory science course. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Morphology, taxonomy, ecology, and physiology of microorganisms, with emphasis on bacteria. Laboratory techniques on culture and identification of bacteria. Recommended for agriculture, biochemistry, nursing, pre-medical and pre-dental, biotechnology engineering, and other life science majors. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).
BIOL 250 HUMAN ANATOMY (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab/16-18 hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or BIOL 110 or BIOL 130, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Students learn the gross and microscopic structure of the human body through lecture and laboratory study of dissections, histology slides, anatomy models, and prosected human cadavers. This course is primarily intended for Nursing, Allied Health, Kinesiology, and other health related majors. This course is an elective for pre-dental, premedical, and pre-veterinary students. Recommended for general life science majors, respiratory therapy majors, and physical education majors. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 260 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY (5)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/96-108 lab. Prerequisite: BIOL 250 or equivalent; and CHEM 192, or CHEM 210, or CHEM 410, or equivalent.
Students learn through lecture and laboratory experiences how the organ systems function in maintaining homeostasis ? regulating change and growth processes in humans. This course is primarily intended for Nursing, Allied Health, Kinesiology, and other health related majors. This course is an elective for pre-dental and pre-medical students. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 365 INTERTIDAL INTERPRETATION (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus field trips.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the major life forms of the intertidal zone of the California coast, their taxonomic groupings, common names, basic anatomical and physiological characteristics and their role in the ecosystem. Transfer credit: CSU.

BIOL 415 INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY MANUFACTURING (9)

A total of 96 lecture hours and 144 lab hours plus 32 hours by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and eligibility for MATH 110 or MATH 111, or equivalent.

An introductory course to prepare students who possess transferable skills from other occupations for entry-level positions in the biotechnology industry. Course instruction will include basic skills in biology, biomanufacturing, chemistry, and an introduction to biotechnology careers. Transfer credit: CSU.

BIOL 426 GENETIC ENGINEERING (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Hours/semester: 16-18 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
This course will examine how genes work and how they can be manipulated and cloned. Topics include DNA and protein synthesis, genetic engineering, and DNA fingerprinting. Also includes laboratory experience with DNA analyses: RFLP and PCR. Transfer credit: CSU.

BIOL 430 INTRODUCTION TO IMMUNOLOGY (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Hours/semester: 16-18 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
This course will examine the immune system and how it protects us from disease. Topics include vaccine and antiserum production by traditional methods and by genetic engineering. Also includes laboratory experience with laboratory techniques. Transfer credit: CSU.

BIOL 432 FERMENTATION TECHNOLOGY (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Hours/semester: 16-18 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Overview of the origin and development of industrial fermentations. Course will use fermentation of beverages, food ingredients, enzymes, chemicals and pharmaceuticals to demonstrate microbial metabolism.

BIOL 665 SELECTED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Hours/semester: 8-9 lecture per .5 unit.
This course is designed to develop specific skills, techniques or concepts that are appropriate to biology and/or biotechnology. The course will focus on one specific topic; for example, new or leading edge developments in biotechnology. Transfer credit: CSU.

BIOL 675 HONORS COLLOQUIUM IN BIOLOGY (1)
Hours/semester: 16-18 lecture. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in any non-Honors biology level 100 or 200 course.
Readings, discussion, lectures and activities covering selected advanced topics in biology to be determined by the Biology Department and the Honors Program. Honors credit will be earned for both Biology 675 and the concurrently enrolled course. Transfer credit: CSU.

BIOL 695 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BIOL (0.5-3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Hours/semester: 24 lab hours by arrangement for each .5 unit. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Designed for students who are interested in furthering their knowledge via self-paced, individualized instruction provided in selected areas or directed study to be arranged with instructor and approved by the division dean using the Independent Study Form. Varying modes of instruction can be used -- laboratory, research, skill development, etc. For each unit earned, students are required to devote three hours per week throughout the semester. Students may take only one Independent Study course within a given discipline. Transfer credit: CSU.

CHEM 112 CHEMISTRY IN ACTION (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab.
An introduction to chemistry and laboratory investigation for non-science majors. The course will focus on chemicals and reactions common in everyday life, medicine, industry, and in the body. Concepts relating to the nature and interactions of atoms, ions, and molecules will be presented. Students will learn how to use scientific methods to investigate questions about how chemical systems work. Students will also learn to use and evaluate information presented on product labels, in advertisement, and available through the internet. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

CHEM 114 SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab. Prerequisite: MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A conceptual survey of physical science (physics and chemistry) intended for non-science majors at the General Education level. A general discussion of the scientific method and techniques will be followed by physics, chemistry, and integrated topics. The laboratory portion will cover a hands-on exploration of phenomena discussed in lecture. The physics component of the course will discuss motion, force, energy, electricity and magnetism, waves and light. The chemistry component of the course will focus on chemicals and reactions common in everyday life. Concepts relating to the nature and interactions of atoms, ions, and molecules will be presented. Students will also learn to use and evaluate information presented on product labels, in advertisement, and available through the internet. Also listed as PHYS 114. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

CHEM 192 ELEMENTARY CHEMISTRY (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab. Prerequisite: MATH 110 or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An introductory course in Chemistry designed to prepare students for General Chemistry I (CHEM 210). Provides an introduction to fundamental concepts in chemistry with an emphasis on the application of mathematical problem-solving methods to chemistry. Lecture topics will include the basic structure of atoms, the combination of elements in chemical compounds, the metric system and measurement, significant figures, using dimensional analysis and algebra to solve chemical problems, describing chemical reactions using balanced equations, and stoichiometry. In the laboratory, the student will be introduced to the use of common laboratory equipment and techniques. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

CHEM 210 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (5)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/96-108 lab. Prerequisite: MATH 120, or MATH 123 or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent. Recommended: CHEM 192 or one year of high school college preparatory chemistry with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.
The first semester of a two-semester sequence with laboratory intended for science, engineering and pre-professional majors. Includes a detailed study of atomic and molecular structures, stoichiometric calculations, solutions, thermochemistry, gas laws, physical states, atomic electron orbital theory, and chemical bonding. The course also includes laboratory study of these concepts, experimental chemistry techniques, and the analysis and interpretation of experimental findings.Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

CHEM 220 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (5)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/96-108 lab. Prerequisite: CHEM 210, or equivalent.
The second semester of a two-semester sequence with laboratory intended for science, engineering and pre-professional majors. Includes a study of acid-base chemistry, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The course also includes laboratory study of these concepts, experimental chemistry techniques, and the analysis and interpretation of experimental findings. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

CHEM 234 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Prerequisite: CHEM 220, and completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 237, or equivalent.
Nomenclature, bonding, structural isomerism, stereochemistry, conformational analysis, physical properties structure, reactions and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds, with emphasis on alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers. Emphasis on reactivity, and reaction mechanisms. Infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are an integral part. Chemistry 234 is the first semester in a two-semester sequence in organic chemistry. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1).

CHEM 235 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Prerequisite: CHEM 234, or equivalent; and completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 238.
Continuation of CHEM 234 with an introduction to the chemistry of aromatics, amines, carbanions, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones and biochemical topics focusing on structure, synthesis, and mechanisms of reaction. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1).

CHEM 237 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LAB I (2)
Hours/semester: 96-108 lab. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 234.
Organic chemistry laboratory designed to accompany CHEM 234. Introduction of the basic techniques of synthesis, separation and purification of organic compounds. Identification of main functional groups by spectroscopic techniques also introduced. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

CHEM 238 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LAB II (2)
Hours/semester: 96-108 lab. Prerequisite: CHEM 235; the two classes may be taken concurrently.
Laboratory designed to accompany CHEM 235. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B3).

CHEM 410 CHEMISTRY FOR HEALTH SCIENCES (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab. Prerequisite: MATH 110 or appropriate placement test scores and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Survey of the principles of general, organic and biochemistry. The physical and chemical properties of inorganic, organic and biomolecules will be studied. The course will include a study of equilibrium in chemical systems with special emphasis on chemical processes in the body. The laboratory component of the course introduces qualitative and quantitative techniques of chemical study and manipulations with inorganic, organic and biochemical reactions. Designed for Health Science majors (e.g., respiratory therapy, nursing). Not intended for students majoring in biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, or pre-professional programs such as medicine, dentistry or pharmacy. Transfer credit: CSU (B1, B3).
COMP 118 INTRODUCTION TO OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAM DESIGN (4)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week. Recommended: Completion of MATH 110 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 836 or equivalent.

Introduction to computing systems concepts necessary for program coding, compilation and execution; problem-solving techniques; object-oriented analysis and design; program coding, testing and documentation. Students will use the Java language to explore algorithm development, data types, flow of control, classes, objects, methods, vectors, and event-driven programming. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

COMP 155 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING VISUAL BASIC (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 110 or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An introduction to computer programming using the high level language VISUAL BASIC. The course covers terminology and syntax, event-driven and object-oriented programming, how to solve problems starting with descriptions of the problem in English and translating the description into Visual Basic.Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

COMP 156 INTERMEDIATE PROGRAMMING IN VISUAL BASIC (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours and one and one-half lab hours per week. Prerequisite: COMP 155 or equivalent.

An intermediate course in computer programming using the high level language VISUAL BASIC. Emphasis is on user friendly interfaces, structural programming techniques, and general problem solving skills in both numerical and non-numerical applications. Students will be able to formulate, represent and solve problems using the computer. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

COMP 250 INTRODUCTION TO OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING: C++ (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 222 or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400; and some previous programming experience or coursework.
Introduction to programming and software engineering for computer science and engineering majors and computer professionals. A systematic approach to the design, implementation, and management of robust C++ computer programs. Course emphasizes Object-Oriented programming design, programming documentation, testing and debugging techniques. This course conforms to the ACM CS1 standards. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.
COMP 251 INTRODUCTION TO MICROCONTROLLERS WITH C/C++ (1)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lab. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in COMP 250. Recommended: MATH 120 or MATH 122 and MATH 123; and eligbility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Introduction to computer programming concepts and methodologies in C/C++ using microcontrollers to program computer circuits and hardware. Covers a microcontroller such as the Atmel AVR or Arduino single-board computer and circuits like LED displays and servo motor controllers. Teaches algorithms, data types, memory usages and management, files and streams, hardware interfaces, sensors, motors, basic control techniques, and microcontroller peripherals including timers, analog-to-digital conversion, interrupts, and serial communication. Transfer credit: CSU.
COMP 252 DATA STRUCTURES: C++ (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Prerequisite: COMP 250 or equivalent.
Design and implementation of larger projects using object-oriented software engineering principles with emphasis on definition and use of data structures including: arrays, stacks, queues, linked lists, trees, hash tables, dictionaries, sets and graphs. Standard methods are used for sorting, searching and analyzing the relative efficiency of algorithms (Big-O notation). This course conforms to the ACM CS2 standards. Transfer credit: CSU.
COMP 256 COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Prerequisite: COMP 250 or equivalent.
Covers the basics of Integrated Circuit technology, digital logic gates and circuit design, computer organization and ISA standard computer architecture, microcode, number systems and data representation, machine languages, Assembly languages and programming, memory systems, addressing, Operating Systems, interrupt/exception handling, input/output processing, and the connection between high-level language, assembly language, and machine operation on a microprocessor system. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.
COMP 284 INTRODUCTION TO OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING: JAVA (3)

(Letter grade.)

48-54 lecture hours. Recommended: COMP 118 or equivalent; completion of MATH 120, or MATH 122 and MATH 123, or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 100 or ENGL 105, or equivalent

Introduction to object-oriented computer programming for computer science majors and computer professionals. Emphasizes object-oriented design, good software engineering principles and developing fundamental programming skills in Java. This course conforms to the ACM CS1 standards. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

COMP 286 Data Structures: Java

Abstract data type implementation and usage techniques for computer science majors and computer professionals. Object-oriented approach to a variety of abstract data types including: lists, stacks, queues, priority queues, trees, maps and graphs. Also includes advanced sorting and searching topics, and algorithmic analysis using Big-O notation. This course conforms to the ACM CS2 standards.

Units: 3
Degree Credit
Letter Grade Only
  • Lecture hours/semester: 48-54
  • Homework hours/semester: 96-108
Prerequisites: COMP 284 or equivalent
Corequisites: None
Transfer Credit: CSU, UC
C-ID: COMP 132
COMP 312 INSTALLING/USING LINUX AS YOUR PC OS (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A total of 24 lecture hours plus eight lab hours by arrangement.

A first course on installing and using Linux as the operating system running on an Intel-compatible PC or workstation computer. Topics include creating installation media, installing Linux, Linux file system concepts, using the graphical desktop interface, beginning shell (command line) usage, updating the system, and configuring access to common network services. After successful completion of this course, students will be confident installing and using common Linux distributions (e.g., Red Hat, Fedora, SUSE, Ubuntu) on a home or work PC. Also listed as TCOM 312. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 313 WORKING IN A LINUX SHELL ENVIRONMENT (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A total of 24 lecture hours plus eight lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of COMP/TCOM 312, or equivalent experience using a Linux desktop system.

A course on using the Linux shell (command line) environment. Topics include comparing the Linux graphical desktop environment and the shell environment, shell commands for file system usage, shell features for productivity and customization (history, completion, aliases, environment files), advanced shell features (regular expressions, redirection, pipelines), introduction to shell scripts and shell commands for process management and remote system access. After successful completion of this course, students will be confident using the bash-shell environment found on common Linux distributions (e.g., Red Hat, Fedora, SUSE, Ubuntu). Also listed as TCOM 313. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 314 MANAGING A LINUX SYSTEM (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A total of 24 lecture hours plus eight lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of COMP/TCOM 312, or equivalent experience installing or using a Linux system, or equivalent.

An intermediate course on administering a Linux system. Designed for individuals who have installed Linux but who now want a hands-on exposure to key concepts, issues and capabilities for managing a Linux system. Topics include installing from alternate media sources (network installs), managing disk devices (defining partitions, creating file systems, and mounting/un-mounting file systems), creating multi-boot systems and boot loader menus, using run levels including trouble-shooting with single user mode, and maintaining system software including installing from source code and recompiling kernels. The focus of this course is on developing expertise for managing a given Linux system (as opposed to managing services provided to other systems). After successful completion of this course, students will be confident in managing a system with a common Linux distribution (e.g., Red Hat, Fedora, SUSE, Ubuntu). Also listed as TCOM 314. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 356 FUNDAMENTALS OF DATABASE ADMINISTRATION I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week and three lab hours per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: COMP 355 with a grade of C or Credit or better, or equivalent.

Utilizing SQL, this course is designed to give students a firm foundation in basic database tasks. Students will learn to design, create and maintain the latest Oracle database. Successful completion of COMP 355 and COMP 356 constitutes an Oracle Certified Associate program. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 357 FUNDAMENTALS OF DATABASE ADMINISTRATION II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week and three lab hours per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: COMP 356 with a grade of C or Credit or better, or equivalent.

Advanced concepts to maintain an Oracle database, including planning and implementing backup and recovery strategies, trends and problems associated with business networking, and the architecture of the Oracle client/server network. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 378 PROGRAMMING IN PERL (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week and three lab hours per week by arrangement. Recommended: Completion of COMP 118, COMP 250 or COMP 284 with a grade of C or Credit or better, or equivalent.

Programming in the Windows and UNIX environment using PERL to create utility programs. Included is the design, creation, debugging and execution of programs written in the PERL programming language. Transfer: CSU.

COMP 412 FLASH I (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT 403 or equivalent.

In this course students will learn to create and publish Flash animation for the web. Areas of focus include the Flash interface, drawing tools, grouping, creating graphic symbols, keyframes, frame-by-frame animation, layers, tweening, and buttons. By the completion of the course students will publish a basic Flash movie that includes ActionScript buttons. Also listed as CAOT 412. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 413 FLASH II (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT/COMP 412 or equivalent.

In this course students will go beyond the basics and learn the advanced features of Flash. Features covered include masking, movie clips, multiple time lines, sound control, pull-down menus, preloaders, and ActionScript. At the completion of the course students will create a complex Flash movie for the web. Also listed as CAOT 413. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 423 JAVASCRIPT (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT 404 or equivalent.

In-depth examination of the most commonly used web scripting languages and scripting protocols. Scripting elements, procedures and techniques will be studied and applied with the abilities of the non-programmer in mind. Refer to class schedule for specific languages and protocols covered. Also listed as CAOT 420. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 451 PC CONFIGURATION AND REPAIR (6)
Hours/semester: 80 lecture/48-54 lab/16-18 hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: BCM. 105 or equivalent; and completion of or concurrent enrollment in ELEC 110 or TCOM 405, or equivalent training or experience.
This course provides preparation for A+ certification. A hands-on technical course designed to provide an in-depth understanding of PC hardware and software from an installation and repair outlook. Materials covered will include beginning and advanced software, hardware components and configuration, operating systems and how they control the PC. Includes direct hands-on experience with the tools and skills required for entry-level employment. Also listed as TCOM 451. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 481 NETWORK SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/16-18 hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: TCOM 480, or equivalent training or experience. An application-based course in Network Administration specific to LAN?s. Coverage includes the functions and concepts of a wide area network, Microsoft server, designing LAN user accounts and their network administration. Hands-on experience provided in setting up and troubleshooting servers, workstations, network and peripheral devices. Course is patterned after Microsoft networking guidelines. Also listed as TCOM 481. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 482 INTRODUCTION TO ROUTERS (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/16-18 hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: TCOM/BCM. 480, or equivalent training or experience.
Cisco Academy Course ? CCNA 1 & 2. Introductory course on router configuration in wide area networks. Students will perform basic router configurations. Course examines common protocols, IP networking concepts and subnetting techniques. Includes instructor-directed, hands-on activities. This course is patterned after Cisco training guidelines. Also listed as TCOM 482. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 483 NETWORK SWITCHES ? CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/16-18 hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: TCOM/BCM. 480, or equivalent training or experience. Recommended: TCOM/COMP 482, or equivalent training or experience. Cisco Academy Course ? CCNA 3.
Introductory course in network switching concepts and configurations as applied to computer networks. Course examines switching protocols, spanning tree protocols, virtual LANs, and other specific models. Basic design of switch configurations and the use of switches in network architecture will be covered. Includes instructor-directed, hands-on activities. This course is patterned after Cisco training guidelines. Also listed as TCOM 483. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 484 ADVANCED ROUTING CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS (3)

Three lecture hours per week and one lab hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of TCOM 482, or equivalent training or experience. Recommended: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of TCOM 483, or equivalent training or experience.

Cisco Academy Course ? CCNA 3 & 4

An advanced course in routing concepts and configurations on large internetworks. Students will configure and manage routers by implementing advanced features and common routing protocols such as EIGRP and OSPF. Includes instructor-directed hands-on activities. This course is patterned after Cisco Router training guidelines. Also listed as TCOM 484. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 485 TROUBLESHOOTING THE INTERNETWORK (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/16-18 hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: TCOM/COMP 483 and TCOM/COMP 484, or equivalent training or experience.
Outlines the troubleshooting methodology and techniques for routers and switches in a network infrastructure. Students will learn to use existing software and the diagnostic features of a protocol analyzer to troubleshoot and analyze internetworks. The course is patterned after Cisco training guidelines. Also listed as TCOM 485. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 486 NETWORK SECURITY (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/16-18 hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: TCOM 482, or equivalent training or experience.
This course introduces students to network security using firewall and VPN (virtual private network) technology. Students will be exposed to the theory and application of both firewall and VPN network architecture. Students will have the opportunity for hands-on practice to administer security policy and VPN configuration using Checkpoint software. Also listed as TCOM 486. Transfer credit CSU.

COMP 665 SELECTED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (.5-2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Hours/semester: 8-9 lecture hours for each .5 unit. Recommended: MATH 120 or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent. Exploration of selected contemporary topics or themes in Computer Science. Sample topics include new programming languages, operating systems, net-centric computing, problem-solving and program design methodologies, software engineering processes, graphical user interface design, information management, and contemporary issues in Computer Science. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

COMP 680SA THE ART OF CODING: IOS APP DEVELOPMENT WITH SWIFT (3)
Hours/semester: 32-36 lecture/48-54 lab. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ENGL 105, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent.
Introduction to computer hardware and the programming commands to control them. Topics Include: hardware, operating systems, and the Software Development Life Cycle which includes design, development, documentation, the importance of review, principles of testing and maintenance; Algorithm development, Procedural, Structural, and Event-driven programming; data types, variables, expressions, selection and repetition structures, functions passing by value and reference, recursion, all about arrays, file I/O, exception handling, and classes. Students will use the Swift programming language and Apple?s xCode development environment to design and test basic object-oriented, event-driven iOS apps for deployment on an iPhone or iPad. This course engages students in basic computer science concepts and skills necessary to move into and excel in computer science and engineering courses. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 695 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (.5-3)
Hours/semester: 24-162 lab. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Designed for students who are interested in furthering their knowledge via self-paced, individualized, directed instruction provided in selected areas to be arranged with instructor and approved by the division dean using the Independent Study Form. Varying modes of instruction can be used -- laboratory, research, skill development, etc. For each unit earned, students are required to devote three hours per week throughout the semester. Students may take only one Independent Study course within a given discipline. Transfer credit: CSU.

GEOL 100 SURVEY OF GEOLOGY (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An introduction to the principles of geology with emphasis on Earth processes. Course includes the study of rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, volcanoes, earthquakes, and surface processes such as landslides, rivers, and glaciers. Not open to students who have taken or are taking GEOL 210. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1).

GEOL 105 ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCE (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An introduction to the fundamentals of Environmental Earth Science including the interactions between humans and the environment in a geologic context. Course emphasizes the Earth system and connections between the geosphere, biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1).
GEOL 106 WEATHER AND CLIMATE (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Introduction to the study of Earth's atmosphere as a system, with an emphasis on the physical processes that change our atmosphere in the short term and throughout Earth's history. Topics include atmospheric structure and composition, energy balances, seasonal changes, atmospheric moisture, storm systems, climate and climate change. Also listed as GEOG 106. Transfer credit: CSU.

GEOL 180 GEOLOGY OF CALIFORNIA (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

An overview of the general principles of geology with examples from the great diversity of local and regional features found in California. Comparisons to other parts of the world are made, demonstrating that the Golden State contains a microcosm of global geologic evolution. Emphasis on the significant interaction of geology and life in California from the Gold Rush through the Great Earthquake to today. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1).

GEOL 210 GENERAL GEOLOGY (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab/field trips by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An introduction to the principles of geology with emphasis on Earth processes. This course focuses on the internal structure and origin of the Earth and the processes that change and shape it. The laboratory component focuses on the identification of rocks and minerals, topographic and geologic map exercises and the identification of geologic landforms and hazards. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, 3).

GEOL 220 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab.
Origin and history of the Earth and its development through geologic time. The formation of continents and ocean basins and their modifications through time. The evolution of plants and animals as seen through the fossil record. Emphasis on the geologic history of North America. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

GEOL 611 FIELD GEOLOGY I (1)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Field trips by arrangement. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in GEOL 100 or GEOL 210, or equivalent.

Supervised field investigation of selected geologic phenomena. Local field trips and/or weekend excursions to areas of geologic interest (i.e., Lassen Volcanic National Park, Yosemite National Park, Pinnacles National Monument). May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU).

GEOL 680SP GREYWATER PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES (4)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab. Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Principles of greywater reuse as consistent with the California Greywater Code, coupled with hands-on practice in greywater system design and installation. Transfer credit: CSU.
GEOL 695 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (.5-3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Hours/semester: 24-27 lab hours by arrangement for each .5 unit. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Designed for students who are interested in furthering their knowledge via self-paced, individualized, directed instruction provided in selected areas to be arranged with instructor and approved by the division dean using the Independent Study Form. Varying modes of instruction can be used -- laboratory, research, skill development, etc. For each unit earned, students are required to devote three hours per week throughout the semester. Students may take only one Independent Study course within a given discipline. Transfer credit: CSU.
PHYS 105 CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: MATH 110 or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A conceptual introduction to physics intended to foster scientific understanding of the world. Stresses important and applicable topics in motion, force, oscillations, fluids, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, magnetism, light and modern physics. Some students may wish to use this course as extra preparation for algebra-based physics. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1).

PHYS 106 CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS LABORATORY (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lab. Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 105. Recommended: Completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A laboratory exploration of physical phenomena covered in Conceptual Physics (PHYS 105) lecture. Intended to reinforce those topics through hands-on investigation and develop an understanding of the scientific method. May be taken concurrently with, or after completion of, PHYS 105. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B3).

PHYS 114 SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab. Prerequisite: MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A conceptual survey of physical science (physics and chemistry) intended for non-science majors at the General Education level. A general discussion of the scientific method and techniques will be followed by physics, chemistry, and integrated topics. The laboratory portion will cover a hands-on exploration of phenomena discussed in lecture. The physics component of the course will discuss motion, force, energy, electricity and magnetism, waves and light. The chemistry component of the course will focus on chemicals and reactions common in everyday life. Concepts relating to the nature and interactions of atoms, ions, and molecules will be presented. Students will also learn to use and evaluate information presented on product labels, in advertisement, and available through the internet. Also listed as CHEM 114. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 210 GENERAL PHYSICS I (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab. Prerequisite: MATH 130, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent.
The first semester of a two-semester sequence of algebra/trigonometry-based physics. Designed for students majoring in certain fields of letters and science, and required of those planning to enter medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, optometry, agriculture or forestry. Covers mechanics, fluids, waves and thermodynamics. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 211 GENERAL PHYSICS I ? CALCULUS SUPPLEMENT (1)
Hours/semester: 16-18 lecture. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of MATH 242 or MATH 252, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent; and concurrent enrollment in or completion of PHYS 210 or equivalent.
Further depth and application of calculus to topics in PHYS 210. Examples include derivatives and integrals of equations of motion, work done by a variable force, and torque as a cross product. Required of some pre-medical, biology and architecture students. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

PHYS 220 GENERAL PHYSICS II (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab. Prerequisite: PHYS 210 or equivalent.
The second semester of a two-semester sequence of algebra/trigonometry-based physics. Designed for students majoring in certain fields of letters and science, and required of those planning to enter medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, optometry, agriculture or forestry. Covers electricity, magnetism, light and modern physics. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 221 GENERAL PHYSICS II ? CALCULUS SUPPLEMENT (1)
Hours/semester: 16-18 lecture. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of MATH 242 or MATH 252, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent; and concurrent enrollment in or completion of PHYS 220 or equivalent.
Further depth and application of calculus to topics in PHYS 220. Examples include surface integrals for Gauss?s Law, line integrals for Ampere?s Law, and classical wave equation. Required of some premedical, biology and architecture students. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

PHYS 250, 260, 270 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS I, II, III (4, 4, 4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab. Prerequisite: PHYS 250 ?MATH 251 and concurrent enrollment in or completion of MATH 252, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent; PHYS 260 ? PHYS 250 and MATH 252, or equivalent. PHYS 270 ? PHYS 250 and MATH 252, or equivalent.
This three-semester physics sequence is designed to give the student majoring in engineering, physics, or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics.

PHYS 250 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS I ? The first semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics. Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics. Covers Newtonian mechanics, including gravitation and mechanical oscillations. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 260 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS II ? The second semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics (may also be taken as the third semester). Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals pf physics. Covers electricity, magnetism and electromagnetic waves. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 270 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS III ? The third semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics (may also be taken directly after PHYS 250). Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics. Covers fluids, thermodynamics, waves and light, and modern physics. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 260 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS II (4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab. Prerequisite: PHYS 250 and completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 253, or equivalent.
The second semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics (may also be taken as the third semester). Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals pf physics. Covers electricity, magnetism and electromagnetic waves. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 250, 260, 270 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS I, II, III (4, 4, 4)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/48-54 lab. Prerequisite: PHYS 250 ?MATH 251 and concurrent enrollment in or completion of MATH 252, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent; PHYS 260 ? PHYS 250 and MATH 252, or equivalent. PHYS 270 ? PHYS 250 and MATH 252, or equivalent.
This three-semester physics sequence is designed to give the student majoring in engineering, physics, or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics.

PHYS 250 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS I ? The first semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics. Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics. Covers Newtonian mechanics, including gravitation and mechanical oscillations. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 260 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS II ? The second semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics (may also be taken as the third semester). Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals pf physics. Covers electricity, magnetism and electromagnetic waves. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 270 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS III ? The third semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics (may also be taken directly after PHYS 250). Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics. Covers fluids, thermodynamics, waves and light, and modern physics. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 695 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PHYSICS (.5-3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Hours/semester: 24-27 lab hours by arrangement for each .5 unit. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Designed for students who are interested in furthering their knowledge via self-paced, individualized instruction provided in selected areas or directed study to be arranged with instructor and approved by the division dean using the Independent Study Form. Varying modes of instruction can be used -- laboratory, research, skill development, etc. For each unit earned, students are required to devote three hours per week throughout the semester. Students may take only one Independent Study course within a given discipline. Transfer credit: CSU.

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