Skip to contentSkip to top navigationSkip to switch websitesSkip to local navigation

ISLO Assessment Results

Skyline College shaped, adopted, and published in the College Catalog five ISLOs, which are derived from the AA/AS degree requirements: Effective Communication, Critical Thinking, Information Literacy, Citizenship, and Lifelong Wellness.The ISLOs are assessed with an indirect and direct measure.

The indirect measure is through the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE). The CCSSE is a tool used to measure how students perform on standards relative to student engagement. The data resulting from this assessment is then analyzed and discussed by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee.

The direct measure involves the use of a common rubric, which enables faculty to have a common language and criteria around assessment. Each of the ISLOs is scheduled to be assessed on a given semester, with one to two per academic year, until each of the five is assessed by faculty across the disciplines. Select faculty whose courses map up to the ISLO that is scheduled to be assessed that semester use the common rubric to evaluate students’ work within their disciplinary framework. The data resulting from the assessment is then analyzed and discussed by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee and departments as they complete their program review. A campus-wide forum is also held on an annual basis to discuss ISLO assessment results.

 

institutional student learning outcomes logo

Graphic Designed by Skyline College student Livius Darmawan
 

Assessing the Effective Communication ISLO with a Common Rubric

In fall 2015, the College assessed Effective Communication using a common rubric. Twenty faculty across the disciplines whose courses mapped up to the ISLO descriptors evaluated 864 students' work that demonstrated their ability to effectively communicate. At a town hall that was co-hosted by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee and the Academic Senate on October 24, 2016  , participants discussed the results   and their potential implications.

In spring 2017, the Critical Thinking ISLO was assessed indirectly utilizing the CCSSE, the Community College Survey of Student Engagement, which measures student engagement on a variety of dimensions. Asking questions about institutional perceptions as well as student behaviors, the CCSSE results   for questions that align with the ISLOs were used as a proxy for achievement of Skyline College's ISLOs. The Institutional Effectiveness Committee discussed them at their March 27, 2017 meeting  

Effective Communication also was assessed in spring 2012 and the results   were discussed the following fall. 

Assessing the Critical Thinking ISLO with a Common Rubric

In spring 2016, the College assessed Critical Thinking using a common rubric. Twenty three faculty across the disciplines whose courses mapped up to the ISLO descriptors evaluated 625 students' work by applying the relevant parts of the rubric. At a town hall co-hosted by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee and the Academic Senate on October 24, 2016  , participants discussed the results   and their potential implications.

In spring 2017, the Critical Thinking ISLO was indirectly assessed indirectly utilizing the CCSSE, the Community College Survey of Student Engagement, which measures student engagement on a variety of dimensions. Asking questions about institutional perceptions as well as student behaviors, the CCSSE results   for questions that align with the ISLOs were used as a proxy for achievement of Skyline College's ISLOs. The Institutional Effectiveness Committee discussed them at their March 27, 2017 meeting  

Critical Thinking also was assessed in spring 2013, and the results   discussed the following fall. 

Assessing the Information Literacy ISLO with Common Rubrics and a Student Self- Assessment Survey

In fall 2016, the College assessed Information Literacy using a common rubric, and students in those courses completed a self- assessment survey. Twenty- two faculty across the disciplines evaluated 752 students' work. At a Town Hall co-hosted by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee and the Academic Senate on September 25, 2017  , participants discussed the results   and their potential implications. (Precipitated by the belief that information literacy should be infused across the disciplines, assessing work from across the disciplines differed from the last Information Literacy assessment, when it was limited to ENGL 100/105. Participating faculty were encouraged to set aside time for the two information literacy workshops that librarians facilitate.) 

In fall 2013, librarians employed three methods to concurrently assess the Information Literacy ISLO and their program SLOs: (1) evaluating a "search and quick write" in-class exercise with a rubric  , (2) evaluating a sample of English 100 research essays with a rubric  , and (3) analyzing students' responses   to a self-reflection survey. At a town hall co-hosted by the Academic Senate and the Office of Planning, Research, and Institutional Effectiveness, librarians explained the instructional and assessment approaches, highlighted the findings, and posed questions for consideration in improving students' information literacy competencies, all of which are captured in this powerpoint presentation  . (All student work and self-assessments were collected from English 100 since the information literacy requirement is incorporated into all sections of ENGL 100/ 105 via two workshops given by Skyline College librarians. Successful completion of ENGL 100/ 105 is the primary way most students satisfy this 2011 graduation requirement.)

Assessing the Citizenship ISLO with a Common Rubric

In spring 2017, the College assessed the Citizenship ISLO using a common rubric. Eighteen faculty across the disciplines whose courses mapped up to at least one of the descriptors evaluated 420 students' work by applying the relevant parts of the rubric.At a town hall co-hosted by the the Institutional Effectiveness Committee and the Academic Senate on February 26, 2018  , participants discussed the results  

The Citizenship ISLO also was indirectly assessed by way of the CCSSE, Community College Survey of Student Engagement, in spring 2016. Results   were discussed at the Institutional Effectiveness Committee on April 23, 2018. 

The Citizenship ISLO was first assessed in spring 2014. Discussion of the results took place at a town hall co-hosted by the SLOAC Steering Committee and the Academic Senate on Sept. 22, 2014  . A handout   supplemented the percentages presented in the Powerpoint presentation  

Assessing the Lifelong Wellness ISLO with a Common Rubric

In fall 2014, the College assessed Lifelong Wellness using a common rubric, including piloting the growth mindset as a descriptor. Nineteen faculty from primarily Counseling, Kinesiology, and Mathematics whose courses mapped up to the ISLO descriptors evaluated 528 students' work, most of which were self- reflective journals and surveys. At a town hall co-hosted by the SLOAC Steering Committee and the Academic Senate on October 24, 2016  , participants discussed the results   and their potential implications. 

©