Courses Offered

The following courses integrate themes of sustainability or environmental technology into curriculum:

AUTO 510 BASIC HYBRID POWERTRAINS (4)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: AUTO 713 or AUTO 773, and AUTO 751, or equivalent industry experience.

A survey of today’s hybrid vehicle powertrains. Handson experience performing scheduled hybrid maintenance services. Introduction to hybrid vehicle diagnosis and repair. Development of entry-level skills needed to work on hybrid vehicles in a professional environment. Transfer credit: CSU.

 

AUTO 511 PRINCIPLES OF HYBRID AND ELECTRIC DRIVES (7)
Minimum of 104 lecture hours and 24 lab hours/semester. 

A comprehensive survey of today’s hybrid vehiclepowertrains. Lectures on subjects such as battery packs, power electronics, and electric motor theory are supported by labs covering intermediate and advanced diagnosis of hybrids and/or electric drives. This course is a
core requirement of the Hybrid and Electric Drives certificate program. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 842/772 CLEAN AIR CAR I (3.5)
Minimum of 56 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See
above.
Designed to prepare students for the Bureau of
Automotive Repair Smog Check Licensing Exam.
Emphasis is placed on Smog Check rules and regulations, test procedures, and TAS machine operation. May
be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer
credit: AUTO 772 – CSU.
Note: Any student planning to become a licensed
Smog Check Technician should contact the Automotive
Department Coordinator at (650) 738-4410 to discuss
licensing requirements and course prerequisites mandated by the Bureau of Automotive Repair. It is recommended that th

 

 

BIOL 101

BIOL 110

BIOL 145

BIOL 675

ENGL 100

ENGL 110

ENGL 846

ENVS 100

ENVS 680SD

GEOL 105

ESTM 410 

ESTM 425

ESTM 665SE

ESTM 680SC

ESTM 680SF

ESTM 680SH

ESTM 680SI

ESTM 680SJ

ESTM 680SL

ESTM 680SM

FCS 310

ACTG 100 ACCOUNTING PROCEDURES (3)

Three lecture hours per week plus two lab hours per week by arrangement. Recommended: MATH 811 or equivalent, BUS. 115 or equivalent, either CAOT 104 or CAOT 225 or equivalent, and eligibility for ENGL 836.

Introduction to financial accounting procedures for proprietorships in service and merchandising operations. Instruction in manual and computerized accounting systems with hands-on computer experience. Transfer credit: CSU.

ACTG 103 TEN KEY SKILLS (.5)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Proficiency in using the touch method is developed on the ten-key calculating machine for the four basic functions of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Transfer credit: CSU.

ACTG 121 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (4)

Minimum of 64 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: ACTG 100 (3 units), or equivalent; MATH 120, or equivalent; BCM. 225 or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Students taking their first course in accounting are strongly encouraged to complete ACTG 100 before enrolling in ACTG 121. Explores what financial accounting is, why it is important, and how it is used by investors and creditors to make decisions. Covers the application of generally accepted accounting principles, the classified financial statements, and statement analysis. Includes issues relating to asset, liability, and equity valuation; revenue and expense recognition; cash flow; internal controls; and ethics. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ACTG 131 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (4)

Minimum of 64 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: ACTG 121, or equivalent. Recommended: Either BUS. 120 or MATH 241, or equivalent; and BCM. 225 or equivalent.

Examination of how managers use accounting information in decision-making, planning, directing operations, and controlling in an ethical environment. Focus on cost terms and concepts, cost behavior, cost structure, and cost-volume-profit analysis. Examination of profit planning, standard costs, operations and capital budgeting, cost control, and accounting for costs in manufacturing organizations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ACTG 144 QUICKBOOKS: SET-UP AND SERVICE BUSINESSES (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Development and operation of a computerized accounting system using QuickBooks and QuickBooks Pro for the Service Business. Transfer credit: CSU.

ACTG 145 QUICKBOOKS: PAYROLL AND MERCHANDISING (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: ACTG 144 or equivalent.

Financial accounting features of setting up and maintaining a computerized accounting system using the advanced features of QuickBooks Pro along with coverage of payroll and the merchandising business. Transfer credit: CSU.

ACTG 171 FEDERAL INCOME TAX (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 32 lab hours by arrangement/semester.

Preparation of Federal and California income tax returns for individuals; basic income tax law, theory and practice. Students who successfully complete this course may apply to the CTEC, the California Tax Education Council, to become a Registered Tax Preparer in California. Also listed as BCM. 171. Transfer credit: CSU.

ACTG 172 BUSINESS INCOME TAXES (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 32 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: ACTG 100 or ACTG 121, or equivalent and ACTG 171 or equivalent.

Preparation of Federal and California income tax returns for corporations, partnerships and sole proprietorships. Completion of ACTG 172 will enable students to complete most tax returns required of professional tax preparers. Also listed as BCM. 172. Transfer credit: CSU.

ACTG 194 INTRODUCTION TO QUICKBOOKS PRO (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for READ 836 and ENGL 836.

Development and operation of a computerized accounting system using QuickBooks Pro. Transfer credit: CSU.

ACTG 194 INTRODUCTION TO QUICKBOOKS PRO (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for READ 836 and ENGL 836.

Development and operation of a computerized accounting system using QuickBooks Pro. Transfer credit: CSU.

ACTG 197 COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING (1.5)

(Credit/No Credit or letter grade.)

A total of twenty-four lecture hours plus sixteen lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: ACTG 100 or equivalent.

Students will install and set up Peachtree, a popular integrated commercial accounting software package. Peachtree will be used to perform daily processing tasks related to the General Ledger, Accounts Receivable/Payable, Inventory, and Job Costing. A review of accounting concepts and principles is an integral part of the course. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

ACTG 198 ADVANCED COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING WITH PEACHTREE (1.5)

(Credit/No Credit or letter grade.)

A total of twenty-four lecture hours plus sixteen lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: ACTG 197 or equivalent.

Peachtree, an integrated commercial accounting software package, will be used to review, differentiate, and interpret accounting concepts and data in a multitude of business situations. Topics include payroll, book and tax depreciation methods, advanced general ledger tasks, cash flow analysis, and financial statement analysis using computerized modules: payroll, fixed assets, reports, analyses and budgets. Advanced features will be discussed. Transfer credit: CSU.

ACTG 665 SELECTED TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING (0.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours plus 4 lab hours by arrangement for each .5 unit.

Short course used to introduce, develop or review accounting and/or financial topics related to financial planning. Focus on a variety of topics, such as basic accounting skills, introduction to current accounting and financial software applications, upgrades to accounting software, and other related financial planning and budgeting topics. Transfer credit: CSU.

ACTG 665SB TAXATION AND RENTAL REAL ESTATE (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Review of Tax Schedule E. Rental Real Estate and related forms. Vacation homes, part rented personal residences, realtor and owner rules on deducting losses, tax free exchanges, rental LLC's, installment sales, and AMT considerations. Completion of the course meets the California Tax Education Council standards for CPE units of continuing education.CPE units: 24 Federal and 8 California. Transfer credit: CSU.

ACTG 665SE%VOLUNTEER INCOME TAX PREPARATION Students serving in the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program prepare income tax returns for qualifying individuals at no cost. Skyline VITA volunteers receive 24 hours of training and then volunteer to prepare income tax returns for 24 hours at the VITA site on the Skyline campus. Training includes preparation of Federal and California income tax returns and use of TaxWise software. Topics include the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), Child Tax Credit, Child and Dependent Care Credit, filing status, dependency exemptions, basic deductions and adjustments. Transfer: CSU.
ADAP 356 (C) ADAPTED TOTAL FITNESS (1 or .5-1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 48 class hours plus one hour per week by arrangement for 1 unit sections; a minimum of 24 class hours plus one hour per week by arrangement per .5 unit for variable sections. Prerequisite: Physician's recommendation or assignment by the College Health Counselor or Division Dean (on recommendation of instructor). Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ADAP 357 or ADAP 349.

Individual and group participation in exercise using mats, chairs, cardio and weight equipment appropriate for a verified physical disability. (Variable unit sections are open entry.) May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

ADAP 356 (C) ADAPTED TOTAL FITNESS (1 or .5-1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 48 class hours plus one hour per week by arrangement for 1 unit sections; a minimum of 24 class hours plus one hour per week by arrangement per .5 unit for variable sections. Prerequisite: Physician's recommendation or assignment by the College Health Counselor or Division Dean (on recommendation of instructor). Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ADAP 357 or ADAP 349.

Individual and group participation in exercise using mats, chairs, cardio and weight equipment appropriate for a verified physical disability. (Variable unit sections are open entry.) May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

ADAP 357 (C) PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS (1 or .5-1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 48 class hours plus one hour per week by arrangement for 1 unit sections; a minimum of 24 class hours plus one hour per week by arrangement per .5 unit for variable sections. Prerequisite: Physician's recommendation or assignment by the College Health Counselor or Division Dean (on recommendation of instructor). Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ADAP 348 or ADAP 356.

Individual and small group physical fitness needs assessment and participation in exercise, movement patterns, and learning how to accommodate limitations necessary to succeed in a variety of adapted physical education courses. (Variable unit sections are open entry.) May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

ADAP 357 (C) PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS (1 or .5-1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 48 class hours plus one hour per week by arrangement for 1 unit sections; a minimum of 24 class hours plus one hour per week by arrangement per .5 unit for variable sections. Prerequisite: Physician's recommendation or assignment by the College Health Counselor or Division Dean (on recommendation of instructor). Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ADAP 348 or ADAP 356.

Individual and small group physical fitness needs assessment and participation in exercise, movement patterns, and learning how to accommodate limitations necessary to succeed in a variety of adapted physical education courses. (Variable unit sections are open entry.) May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

ADAP 358 ADAPTED STRENGTH DEVELOPMENT (.5-1 or .5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 lab hours for each .5 unit for variable sections; minimum of 24 lab hours for .5 unit sections; minimum of 48 lab hours for 1 unit sections. Prerequisite: Physician’s recommendation or assignment by the College Health Counselor or Division Dean (on recommendation of instructor). Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ADAP 349, 357 or 359.

An introduction to the discipline of Physical Education through strength development in the context of an individual's physical, intellectual and/or affective abilities and limitations. Topics will include equipment use, etiquette, safety, nutrition, and techniques related to strength training for individuals with disabilities. Variable unit sections are open entry. May be repeated for competency and continued evaluation of improvement. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

ADAP 358 ADAPTED STRENGTH DEVELOPMENT (.5-1 or .5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 lab hours for each .5 unit for variable sections; minimum of 24 lab hours for .5 unit sections; minimum of 48 lab hours for 1 unit sections. Prerequisite: Physician’s recommendation or assignment by the College Health Counselor or Division Dean (on recommendation of instructor). Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ADAP 349, 357 or 359.

An introduction to the discipline of Physical Education through strength development in the context of an individual's physical, intellectual and/or affective abilities and limitations. Topics will include equipment use, etiquette, safety, nutrition, and techniques related to strength training for individuals with disabilities. Variable unit sections are open entry. May be repeated for competency and continued evaluation of improvement. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

ADAP 359 BALANCE AND FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT FOR THE PHYSICALLY LIMITED (.5-1 or 1) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lab hours for 1 unit sections; minimum of 24 lab hours for each .5 unit for variable sections. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ADAP 348, 356 or 358.

Assessment and training to enhance coordination, balance and neuromuscular function. Emphasis on functional movement, movement efficiency resulting in improved posture, and functional movement experiences. Variable unit sections are open entry. May be repeated for competency and continued evaluation of improvement. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

ADAP 359 BALANCE AND FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT FOR THE PHYSICALLY LIMITED (.5-1 or 1) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lab hours for 1 unit sections; minimum of 24 lab hours for each .5 unit for variable sections. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ADAP 348, 356 or 358.

Assessment and training to enhance coordination, balance and neuromuscular function. Emphasis on functional movement, movement efficiency resulting in improved posture, and functional movement experiences. Variable unit sections are open entry. May be repeated for competency and continued evaluation of improvement. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

ADMJ 100 INTRODUCTION TO ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

History and philosophy of administration of justice in America; recapitulation of the system; identifying the various subsystems, role expectations and their interrelationships; theories of crime, punishment, and rehabilitation. Survey of the ethics, education, and required training for professionalism in the system. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

ADMJ 102 PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES OF JUSTICE (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

The role and responsibilities of each segment within the administration of justice system ' law enforcement, judicial, and corrections. Procedures in each sub-system and how they relate to one another. May include field research. Transfer credit: CSU.

ADMJ 104 CONCEPTS OF CRIMINAL LAW (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, ADMJ 100 or LEGL 240, or equivalent and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Historical development and philosophy of criminal law and constitutional provisions. Special emphasis on legal definitions, the classifications of crime and their application to the administration of justice system. Study of case law, methodology, and concepts of law as a social force. Also listed as LEGL 304. Transfer credit: CSU.

ADMJ 106 LEGAL ASPECTS OF EVIDENCE (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, ADMJ 100 or LEGL 240, or equivalent and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Origin, development, philosophy and constitutional basis of evidence; constitutional and procedural considerations affecting arrest, search and seizure; kinds and degrees of evidence and rules governing admissibility; judicial decisions and interpreting individual rights and case studies. Also listed as LEGL 306. Transfer credit: CSU.

ADMJ 108 COMMUNITY RELATIONS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Satisfacory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, ADMJ 100 or SOCI 100, or equivalent and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

The roles of administration of justice practitioners and their agencies. Principal emphasis upon professional image of the system of justice administration and the development of positive relationships between members of the system and the public. Also listed as SOCI 108. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ADMJ 110 POLICE REPORT WRITING (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, ADMJ 100, or equivalent and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Exploration of effective police report writing techniques, including crime, arrest and incident reports. Examination of interview methods, note taking, report organization and documentation, crime scene diagrams, search warrant affidavits, and case preparation for prosecution. Emphasis on essential principles of written and oral communication in law enforcement, including testifying in court. Transfer credit: CSU.

ADMJ 120 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, ADMJ 100 or LEGL 240, or equivalent and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

A course designed for introductory and in-service Administration of Justice students to provide orientation to general and specific aspects of crimes and detection. The course also covers crime scene searches and suspect apprehension. Also listed as LEGL 320. Transfer credit: CSU.

ADMJ 123 CONCEPTS OF ENFORCEMENT PRINCIPLES (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, ADMJ 100, or equivalent and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Explanation of theories, philosophies, and concepts related to the role expectations of the enforcement officer. Emphasis is placed on patrol, traffic, and public service responsibilities and their relationship to the administration of justice systems. Transfer credit: CSU.

ADMJ 125 JUVENILE PROCEDURES (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, ADMJ 100, or equivalent and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

The study of the extent, causation, and prevention of juvenile delinquency. Includes an analysis of juvenile courts, probation, institutional treatment, parole, and prevention programs. The sociological and anthropological approaches to juvenile delinquency will be discussed in terms of their relationship to the administration of justice systems. Transfer credit: CSU.

ADMJ 134 TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, ADMJ 100, or equivalent and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

A study of the fundamentals of traffic law enforcement and collision investigations, including traffic laws and regulations; the purposes and methods of traffic enforcement, detecting traffic law violators and DUI drivers; conducting field sobriety tests; investigating traffic collisions; skid mark and evidence analysis, preparing traffic citations, diagrams and collision reports; and testifying in traffic court. Transfer credit: CSU.

ADMJ 135 NARCOTICS AND SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, ADMJ 100, or equivalent and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

This course is designed to acquaint the Administration of Justice student with background and historical information necessary to enter a law enforcement agency. Such information involves identification of drugs, drug abuses, mental and physical effects, and addiction. There will also be special emphasis on vice and deviant behavior including victimless crimes. Transfer credit: CSU.

ADMJ 180 CRIMINAL IDENTIFICATION (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, ADMJ 100, or equivalent; and completion of ADMJ 102 and ADMJ 106 with grades of C or better, or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent. and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or equivalent.

Theory and practices in the science of fingerprints, including classification, filing, comparisons, latent print technology, preservation of evidence, court testimony, rolling prints, computers, and the law as it pertains to Criminal Identification. Other aspects of personal identification include skeletal identification, portrait parle, composites, blood evidence, and basic camera procedures. Transfer credit: CSU.

ADMJ 205 JUDICIAL PROCESS IN CALIFORNIA (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

An overview of the federal court system, the California courts, and administrative agency tribunals. Careful examination of roles and relationships of the courthouse work group. Also listed as LEGL 305. Transfer credit: CSU.

ADMJ 665 SELECTED TOPICS IN ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE (.5-2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours per .5 unit. Recommended: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, ADMJ 100, or equivalent.

Advanced specialized study in Administration of Justice. This program is designed to offer unique or specialized criminal justice topics of contemporary student interest. Students will learn from and work closely with criminal justice practitioners and bring this newly acquired knowledge back into the community. Topics vary. Transfer credit: CSU.

ADMJ 670 – Criminal Justice Internship (Cooperative Education) (1-4)

(Pass/No Pass.)

60 hours of volunteer work (or 75 hours paid work) at site for each unit/semester. Prerequisites: Completion of ADMJ 100 with a C or better and completion of six units of any of the following ADMJ core courses with a C or better: ADMJ 102, 104, 106, 108 or 110 (three of the six units may be met by concurrent enrollment). Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Designed as an on-site experiential learning opportunity for advanced and qualifying Administration of Justice Program students who wish to apply their program skills and knowledge through a supervised volunteer work experience internship at a selected criminal justice agency. Enrollment and participation in this course is with the approval of the ADMJ Program Coordinator. Must be at least 18 years old and a U.S. citizen, have no felony convictions, possess a background history consistent with work in criminal justice, and ability to pass a background investigation to be conducted by the criminal justice agency. Transfer credit: CSU.

ANTH 110 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

A comparative analysis of human cultures with an emphasis on core concepts such as kinship, religion, politics, technology, and an appreciation of societal variability. When appropriate, comparison is made with present-day American society to show the effect of societal diversity, size and complexity on cultural factors. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

ANTH 125 PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

Biological consideration of the origin, development, and potential survival of humans and other primates. Topics include concepts of evolution: natural selection and populations, patterns of inheritance, the fossil record, and behavioral adaptations. The course will examine how biological, physical, and cultural variations have allowed human populations to adapt to various physical environments. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2).

ANTH 126 PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY LABORATORY (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ANTH 125. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

Laboratory designed to assist students to become familiar with the methods of the science of biological anthropology while investigating topics in laboratory and field situations. Topics covered in the course include the scientific method, biological variation and forces of evolution, human osteology and variation, comparative osteology of primates, and fossil evidence for human evolution. Field trips may be offered. Transfer credit: CSU.

ANTH 127 PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY LABORATORY (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ANTH 125. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

Laboratory designed to assist students to become familiar with the methods of the science of biological anthropology while investigating topics in laboratory and field situations. Topics covered in the course include the scientific method, biological variation and forces of evolution, human osteology and variation, comparative osteology of primates, and fossil evidence for human evolution. Field trips may be offered. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B3).

ANTH 150 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY: BONES, BEADS AND THE BASICS OF MATERIAL CULTURE (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

Explore cultural diversity using theories and methods of anthropological archaeology. The course typically includes discussions of the development of archaeological research, excavation methods, data analysis, and selected cultural sequences. Field trips may be required. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

ANTH 155 HUMAN PREHISTORY AND THE RISE OF CIVILIZATION (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

An anthropological survey of human and hominid prehistory spanning over two million years. Emphasis is on the origin and cultural evolution of the world’s first settled communities and early civilizations, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Europe, Central America, and South America. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

ANTH 165 SEX AND GENDER: CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

A survey of cross-cultural and historical factors influencing human sexuality, gender roles and identity. The course emphasizes non-Western cultures such as Asian, African, and the Indigenous Americas. Diverse cultural forces affecting both female and male status, such as economics, religion, and sexual practices, will be examined. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

ANTH 170 ANTHROPOLOGY OF DEATH (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

Examination of cross-cultural perspectives on beliefs and practices around death and dying. Selected topics may include funerary practices, cannibalism, bereavement, and concepts of the afterlife. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

ANTH 180 MAGIC, WITCHCRAFT AND RELIGION (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

A cross-cultural exploration of supernatural belief systems focusing on non-literate, tribal and ethnic cultures; history and methods of the anthropological approach to religion; the dynamics of myth, magic, totem, taboo, cults, and sects. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

ANTH 360 NATIVE PEOPLES OF NORTH AMERICA (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

An introduction to the life ways of representative Native American culture groups found in different geographical areas of North America. The course will examine settlement patterns and environmental adaptations, social organizations, world view, and the arts chronologically and cross-culturally, with emphasis on the impact of contact with European cultures. Field trips may be arranged to investigate archaeological evidence. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ANTHROPOLOGY (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ARBC 111 ELEMENTARY ARABIC I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours /semester.

The first of a two-course sequence in basic elementary Arabic. Conversation in the language, dictation, reading, and study of the fundamentals of grammar; simple oral and written exercises; an introduction to Arabic culture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

ARBC 112 ELEMENTARY ARABIC II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 48 lecture hours /semester. Prerequisite: Completion of ARBC 111, or equivalent.

Second course of a two-semester sequence in basic elementary Arabic. Conversation in the language, dictation, reading and study of the fundamentals of grammar, simple oral and written exercises, and an introduction to Arabic culture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

ARBC 121 ADVANCED ELEMENTARY ARABIC I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week and one lab hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Completion of ARBC 112 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.

First course of a two-semester sequence in advanced elementary Arabic. Students practice and develop further communicative competence in written and spoken Arabic for use in a variety of social contexts and settings. Conversation in the language, reading and study of the fundamentals of grammar, and simple oral and written exercises. Cultural aspects of the Arabic-speaking world are emphasized. The course is conducted primarily in Arabic. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

ARBC 122 ADVANCED ELEMENTARY ARABIC II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week and one lab hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Completion of ARBC 121 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.

Second course of a two-semester sequence in advanced elementary Arabic. Students practice and develop further communicative competence in written and spoken Arabic for use in a variety of social contexts and settings. Conversation in the language, reading and study of the fundamentals of grammar, and simple oral and written exercises. Cultural aspects of the Arabic-speaking world are emphasized. The course is conducted primarily in Arabic. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

ARBC 801 STANDARD SPOKEN ARABIC I (2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Three lecture hours and one lab hour by arrangement per week.

A practical course in the Arabic language approached by way of conversation. Intensive drill in the patterns and idioms of daily speech in standard spoken Arabic, with sufficient grammar to give flexibility to the spoken language. Introduction to Arabic culture. (This course will not fulfill the foreign language requirement at California State Universities or at the University of California).

ART 101 HISTORY OF WESTERN ART I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

Comprehensive survey of the history of arts (architecture, painting, sculpture and other media) in the Western traditions and the understanding of art as reflections of the cultures from which the art emerged. Survey of the arts from the historic periods of the Prehistoric to the late 1300’s. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

ART 102 HISTORY OF WESTERN ART II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

Comprehensive survey of the history of arts (architecture, painting, sculpture and other media) in the Western traditions and the understanding of art as reflections of the cultures from which the art emerged. Survey of the arts from the historic periods of the Renaissance to contemporary times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

ART 105 ART OF ASIA AND THE NEAR EAST (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

Survey of Asian and Near Eastern Art, especially India, China and Japan, and Persia. Investigation of the cultural sources of artwork as well as their aesthetic qualities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

ART 107 ART OF OUR TIMES (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

An introduction to the American visual experience of today including painting, sculpture, architecture, industrial, interior, package, advertising, furniture, design, etc. Transfer credit: CSU (C1).

ART 115 ART, MUSIC AND IDEAS (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

An integrated consideration of art and music as reflections of the philosophies and traditions of cultures. The understanding of the various elements common to the creative efforts of art and music are emphasized as a means to enhance and extend a student’s recognition, involvement, and ultimately, appreciation of these effores. Diverse media are examined to demonstrate the realizations of ideas into works of art and music. Also listed as MUS. 115. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

ART 120 ART OF THE AMERICAS (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

An examination of the diverse indigenous arts and cultures of the Americas, the impact of colonialism and the development of ethnic arts in the 19th and 20th centuries in the Americas. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

ART 130 ART APPRECIATION (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

An investigation of the concepts and traditions of art to develop the recognition of arts' communicative abilities. Historical events, customs, traditions, and technology are to be evaluated as integrated and interactive elements which influence the creation of art. The synthesis and articulation of the students' perceptions for discussion are emphasized. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

ART 201 FORM AND COMPOSITION I (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three unit sections meet three lecture hours and three lab hours per week plus three studio hours by arrangement per week; two unit sections meet two lecture hours and two lab hours per week plus one studio hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: ART 202 ' ART 201.

ART 201 Form and Composition I: ' Study of form and space relationships with rendering of line, mass, and values through a sequence of original problems based on the fundamental understanding of geometric forms. Media will include pencils, conte crayons, inks and paints. Recommended as a first level course for anyone desiring to participate in an art experience or program. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).
ART 202 FORM AND COMPOSITION II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three unit sections meet three lecture hours and three lab hours per week plus three studio hours by arrangement per week; two unit sections meet two lecture hours and two lab hours per week plus one studio hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: ART 202 ' ART 201.

ART 202 Form and Composition II ' Further study of form and advanced composition using various media in black and white and in color, illustration, experimental pictorial composition and three dimensional constructions. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 204 DRAWING I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 studio hours by arrangement/semester.

Basic introduction to drawing using both simple and complex forms derived from nature, life, and still life sources. A variety of media will be used. Recommended as a first level course for anyone desiring to participate in an art experience or program. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

ART 205 DRAWING II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: ART 204 or ART 201.

Materials and techniques in common use; traditional and contemporary pen, pencil, and conte crayon expression. Rendering of everyday objects and scenes. Methods of depicting shade, shadows, and textures, and acquiring skill in value transition. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 207 LIFE DRAWING (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 studio hours by arrangement/semester.

The study of the human form as art using the techniques and materials of drawing in severla media. Application of fundamental studies of anatomy in the pursuit of expressive representation of the human figure. Studio practice drawing from live models. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 208 PORTRAIT DRAWING I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Portrait characterizations using the techniques and materials of drawing in several media. Application of fundamental studies of the anatomy of the head and faces in the pursuit of expressive representations of people. Individualized instruction is emphasized. Studio practice drawing from live models. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 209 PORTRAIT DRAWING II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: ART 208. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Advanced portrait characterizations expanding upon the drawing techniques of Portrait Drawing I. Further enhancements of drawings based upon astute studies of the anatomy of the head and faces. Individualized instruction is emphasized. Studio drawing sessions of male and female live models. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 214 COLOR (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 studio hours by arrangement/semester.

Drawing proficiency is not required. Introduction to the physical and psychological properties of color. This course stresses the knowledge and skills needed to use color aesthetically. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 221 PAINTING I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: ART 222 – ART 221.

Fundamentals of image creation with various paint media. An exploration of techniques, materials and approaches to use painting to create artworks which share ideas and perceptions with others.Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

ART 222 PAINTING II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: ART 221.

Refinement and further development of the art of painting in the creation of works which share ideas and perceptions with others. An intermediate level course in techniques, materials and theories of painting.Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 231 WATERCOLOR I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Satisfactory completion of one or more college level studio art courses.

Introduction to Transparent and Opaque Watercolor. Varied approaches and techniques. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 232 WATERCOLOR II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: ART 231 or equivalent.

Additional exploration of watercolor painting as a vehicle for creative art expression. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 234 PRINTMAKING I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Basic introduction to printmaking using techniques and materials to create limited edition prints in a variety of media. May include Monotype, Drypoint, Collograph, Lithography, and Lino cut. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 235 PRINTMAKING II (2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three unit sections meet three lecture hours and three lab hours per week plus three studio hours by arrangement per week; two unit sections meet two lecture hours and two lab hours per week plus one studio hour by arrangement per week.

Further exploration of printmaking techniques including etching, monotype, woodcut and linocut. Students will specialize in an area for advanced study and production. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 239 PRINTMAKING II: MONOTYPE, MONOPRINT AND MIXED MEDIA (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: ART 234 or equivalent.

Advanced practice in monotype, monoprint, and mixed media print processes. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 248 PORTRAITS IN PASTEL (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: ART 208 or equivalent.

Introductory course to portraitute in the medium of pastels. Techniques with soft pastels and other related media on a variety of material surfaces will be explored. Emphasis on artistic expressions utilizing the techniques of soft pastels to draw and color portrait images. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

ART 301 DESIGN (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 studio hours by arrangement/semester.

Introduction to basic design elements and principles including color, line and form. Studio application involving various approaches to subject matter and abstract organization. Transfer credit: UC, CSU (C1).

ART 302 ADVANCED DESIGN (2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three unit sections meet three lecture hours and three lab hours per week plus three studio hours by arrangement per week; two unit sections meet two lecture hours and two lab hours per week plus one studio hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisites: ART 302 ' ART 301.

ART 302 Advanced Design ' Additional study of design elements and principles. Studio practice centered upon creative interpretations and problem solving, using varied art materials and techniques both two and three dimensional. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: UC, CSU.
ART 311 LETTERING AND LAYOUT I (2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three unit sections meet three lecture hours and three lab hours per week plus three studio hours by arrangement per week; two unit sections meet two lecture hours and two lab hours per week plus one studio hour by arrangement per week.

Development of student proficiency in lettering and layout techniques and principles required for graphic design. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 312 LETTERING AND LAYOUT II (2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three unit sections meet three lecture hours and three lab hours per week plus three studio hours by arrangement per week; two unit sections meet two lecture hours and two lab hours per week plus one studio hour by arrangement per week.

Development of student proficiency in lettering and layout techniques and principles required for graphic design. ART 312 may be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 322 ILLUSTRATION (2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three unit sections meet three lecture hours and three lab hours per week plus three studio hours by arrangement per week; two unit sections meet two lecture hours and two lab hours per week plus one studio hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: ART 204 Drawing I; Recommended: ART 301 Design.

The use of diverse art techniques and materials to meet the image or illustration requirements of commercial designs. Drawing, painting, three-dimensional, and photographic techniques will be examined. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 338 ADVERTISING ART (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Two lecture hours and two lab hours per week plus one studio hour by arrangement per week.

Study of commercial art techniques and approaches with an emphasis on creative design and illustration used in advertising art. Studio practice in preparation of art work for reproduction. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 350 VISUAL PERCEPTION THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours. Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

A course which combines fundamentals of digital picture taking and the analysis of images to gain insights into photography’s communicative abilities and how they influence viewers' understanding of their world. Students' own work and images from print media, movies and television are used as the basis for discussion. Transfer credit: CSU (C1).

ART 351 BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 48 studio hours by arrangement/semester; two unit sections meet a minimum of 32 lecture hours and 32 lab hours plus 32 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

An introduction to film-based 35mm black and white photography. Students will gain skills to view and produce photographs as an alternative means of sharing personal observations and perceptions. To develop personally meaningful images, the knowledge and application of photographic equipment, materials and techniques are emphasized. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

ART 352 BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 48 studio hours by arrangement/semester; two unit sections meet a minimum of 32 lecture hours and 32 lab hours plus 32 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: ART 351 or equivalent

An intermediate course expanding upon concepts and techniques developed in ART 351. Students will enhance skills to produce photographs to better share personal observations and perceptions. Critical considerations of style, content and presentation will be fundamental components of students' projects. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

ART 353 BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY III (3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 48 studio hours by arrangement/semester; two unit sections meet a minimum of 32 lecture hours and 32 lab hours plus 32 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisites: ART 352 or equivalent.

An advanced course expanding upon concepts and techniques developed in ART 351 and ART 352. Major emphasis is on the critical considerations of the application of skills to produce photographs that share personal perspectives based upon observations and perceptions. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 354 COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY I (3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Introduction to the use of color photography as an alternative means of sharing personal observations and perceptions. In addition to the knowledge and application of the photographic equipment, materials and techniques, students are introduced to the concepts and principles of using images as a means of communication and expression. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 355 COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY II (3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: ART 354 or equivalent.

A continuation of Color Photography I, expanding upon the understanding and use of images as an alternative means of sharing personal perspectives and expressions. An important emphasis of course is the production of artworks that reflect upon personal observations, perceptions and considerations of one's world. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 363 ALTERNATIVE PROCESSES IN PHOTOGRAPHY I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Two lecture hours plus three lab hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 351 or demonstration of basic darkroom skills.

An introduction to non-silver printing processes, transfer of Polaroid images to other media, and hand-coloring techniques for print modification. Explores manipulations of original images to reveal forms of expression unattainable through traditional photographic processes. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 364 ALTERNATIVE PROCESSES IN PHOTOGRAPHY II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Two lecture hours plus three lab hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 363 or equivalent skills and techniques.

Elaboration and refinement of techniques introduced in ART 363: non-silver printing processes, Polaroid transfer, emulsion transfer, lithographic materials, and others. Emphasizes the completion of a cohesive portfolio of personally significant images utilizing sophisticated application of non-traditional photographic processes. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 377 DIGITAL IMAGING II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Two lecture and three lab hours per week plus one lab hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: ART 376.

An intermediate course expanding creative efforts in producing art with computerized imaging and the alteration of the art with image manipulation software such as Adobe Photoshop. Refinement of use of output modes for digital files. Continued in-depth application of principles of design, art theories, and consideration of the works of contemporary and historic artists. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 401 THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 hours by arrangement/semester.

Introduction to fundamental concepts and the historical references of organizing forms in three dimensions. Studio application involving various materials to explore 3-D concepts. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 405 SCULPTURE I (3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 studio hours by arrangement/semester.

An introduction to sculpture processes. Studio practice using a variety of materials, e.g., wood, metal, plaster, clay, stone and mixed-media assemblage to make three dimensional works of art. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

ART 406 SCULPTURE II (3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: ART 405 or equivalent.

Advanced study and practice in three dimensional form; a continuation of ART 405 in developing mastery of the media of sculpture, e.g., wood, metal, plaster, clay, stone, and mixed-media assemblage. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 407 SCULPTURE III: DIRECT METAL (3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: ART 405 or equivalent.

Creation of sculptural form in metal using welding, brazing and soldering techniques for fabrication of line, plane, found-object and mixed-media compositions. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 408 BRONZE CASTING (1)

(Credit/No Credit or letter grade.)

Total of sixteen lecture and nine lab hours.

An intensive introduction to the bronze casting process. Students will be given an overview of objects made of bronze, from earliest tools produced to present-day sculpture and from many different cultures. They will then make a sculpture in clay and take that sculpture through all of the stages involved in converting it into a finished bronze. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 411 CERAMICS I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 studio hours by arrangement/semester.

An introductory course in ceramics and the creative process. Students will learn ceramic hand-building, glazing and firing methods as a means of self-expression and communication. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

ART 412 CERAMICS II (3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisites: ART 411 or equivalent. Recommended: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ART 301 recommended.

Additional study of ceramic processes and their application in art. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 417 CERAMIC GLAZING TECHNIQUES (3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: Art 412 or equivalent.

Advanced glazing techniques including special glazes, glaze composition, and multi-firing techniques. Projects with emphasis on glaze effects. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

ART 418 CERAMICS III (3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: ART 412 or equivalent.

Advanced study of ceramics with a focus on either sculptural or functional artworks in clay. A series of focused ceramics pieces will culminate in the creation of a portfolio. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 430 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL ART (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

Explores creative uses of digital technologies, and introduces digital art from historical and contemporary perspectives. Learn a range of skills and software used in the creation and editing of digital artworks for print, web, and multimedia. This entry-level course is a prerequisite for all other Digital Arts courses. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 431 RASTER IMAGE DESIGN I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 studio hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: ART 430 or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

A digital art course using creative assignments to study specific concepts as well as encouraging creative exploration of the topic and software. Students develop creative digital images using digital manipulation and image correction software like Adobe Photoshop. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 665, 667 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ART (.5 or 1 or 2 or 3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Lecture-based sections (1 or 2 or 3 units):Minimum of 16, 32 or 48 lecture hours/semester, plus additional hours by arrangement where indicated. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Studio-activity sections (.5 or 1 or 2 or 3 units):Minimum of 24, 48, 96 or 144 lab hours/semester, plus additional studio hours and/or hours by arrangement. Recommended: Successful completion of a beginning art studio course, or equivalent.

Specialized courses in Art designed for the focused investigation of a particular issue or topic. The courses are designed to address either artistic theoretical or rhetorical issues, or to acquire technical or craftsmanship skills of particular materials and processes associated with a specific studio art. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 665S1 OIL PAINTING Recommended: Successful completion of a beginning art studio course, or equivalent. Beginning to advanced studio practice in oil painting. Study includes a variety of technical approaches to form, composition and content. Transfer: UC; CSU.
ART 665SI INTENSIVE PAINTING STUDIO (0.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lab hours/semester Recommended: ART 221 or equivalent. Exploration and application of ideas and strategies used to manifest art in the form of painting. This class allows uninterrupted hours in which to concentrate on the creation of paintings and to share ideas and perceptions with others. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 665SY CERAMICS: SURFACES AND FIRINGS Recommended: Successful completion of a beginning art studio course, or equivalent. In this class, open to intermediate and advanced levels, continuing ceramics students will select an advanced functional or sculptural ceramics topic to study and practice. Emphasis will be on surface techniques and various firing methods. NOTE: This course has a non-refundable materials charge of $10. Transfer: UC; CSU.
ART 667SA CERTAMICS PORTFOLIO Recommended: Successful completion of a beginning art studio course, or equivalent. Open to intermediate to advanced ceramics students, this class will help continuing ceramics students create a series of focused clay artwork. We will also cover writing an artist statement and how to document the pieces you create. NOTE: This course has a non-refundable materials charge of $12. Transfer: UC; CSU.
ART 667SB PLASTER SCULPTURE Recommended: Successful completion of a beginning art studio course, or equivalent. Plaster is an inexpensive and highly versatile material. We will explore some of the many possible approaches to building a sculpture including the use of armatures, solid blocks, chicken wire and burlap. NOTE: This course has a non-refundable materials charge of $10. Transfer: UC; CSU.
ART 667SC CREATIVE PORTRAITURE Recommended: Successful completion of a beginning art studio course, or equivalent. Exploration and experimentation with representational portraiture. For the student who has a foundation in traditional portrait drawing. Emphasis will be on an in-depth study of the finished portraiture in black and white and/or color media. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer: UC; CSU.
THE INDIVIDUAL PORTRAIT (2) We will seek out and explore, even celebrate, the individual differences in a person's face and in his personality. We will abandon all preconceptions of what a face "should" look like, abandon generic symbols, and seek out what is unique about a person, what sets him apart from others. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer: UC; CSU.
ART 667SE ADVANCED TECHNIQUE IN CERAMIC SCULPTURE Students will explore a board range of techniques with the material clay, including advanced methods of guilding, glazing and firing. This course has a non-refundable materials charege of $10. Transfer: UC; CSU.
ART 667SF POINT AND SHOOT DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY (.5) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Overall functions of your point and shoot digital camera and the creative abilities you can achieve once you have mastered the various features included in your camera’s manual menu. Transfer: UC; CSU.
ART 667SI BEGINNING CERAMICS (2.5) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 24 lab hours/semester. An introductory course to ceramics and the creative process. Students will learn hand-building, glazing, as well as loading and firing kilns using ceramics as a means of self-expression and communication. Transfer: UC; CSU.

ART 695 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART (0.5-3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Designed for students who are interested in furthering their knowledge via self-paced, individualized instruction provided in selected areas or directed study to be arranged with instructor and approved by the division dean using the Independent Study Form. Varying modes of instruction can be used -- laboratory, research, skill development, etc. For each unit earned, students are required to devote three hours per week throughout the semester. Students may take only one Independent Study course within a given discipline. Transfer credit: CSU.

ASL 111 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours /semester.

A basic course in American Sign Language with focus on everyday communication: exchanging information, beginning with exchanging names and moving to talking about one’s background; identifying others; making requests; giving reasons; giving opinions; giving simple directions. Topics center around personal information and the immediate environment. Grammar is introduced in context, with an emphasis on developing question and answer skills. Students rehearse conversation strategies for getting attention, asking for clarification, and correcting information to minimize misunderstanding. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

ASL 112 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours /semester. Prerequisite: ASL 111 or equivalent.

Functions and grammar introduced in American Sign Language I are reviewed and expanded to include giving directions, making plans, describing and identifying objects and locations, giving simple instructions, and telling what happened. Topics move from students talking about themselves and the immediate environment to talking about others and their community. Students develop language skills necessary to question, describe, and explain. Students rehearse conversation strategies and volunteer appropriate information to maintain a comfortable exchange. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

ASL 121 ADVANCED ELEMENTARY AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours /semester. Prerequisite: Completion of ASL 112 or equivalent curriculum.

The first course in an advanced elementary two-course sequence for hearing and non-hearing students. The course covers approximately the same material as the first half of a university-level second semester American Sign Language course. Students will acquire a basic ability to sign and understand deaf culture at the advanced elementary level and will learn about the customs, culture and history of the deaf world. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

ASL 122 ADVANCED ELEMENTARY AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours /semester. Prerequisite: Completion of ASL 121 or equivalent curriculum.

The second course in an advanced elementary two-course sequence for hearing and non-hearing students. The course covers approximately the same material as the second half of a university-level second semester American Sign Language course. Students will acquire a basic ability to sign and understand deaf culture at the advanced elementary level and will learn about the customs, culture and history of the deaf world.Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

ASTR 100 INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.

Survey of modern astronomy, including the study of what mankind understands about the universe and our place in it. Emphasis on how mankind has learned about the planets, stars, galaxies, and their structure and formation. Quasars, pulsars, black holes, and the beginning and the end of the universe are discussed. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1).

ASTR 101 ASTRONOMY LABORATORY (1)

Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ASTR 100, or equivalent. Recommended: Completion of MATH 110, or equivalent.

Constellation identification, understanding of right ascension and declination, and basic astronomical measurements of our moon, planets, stars and universe. Telescopic and naked eye observations will be assigned. This course will develop the student’s awareness of the scientific method and how to apply it to specific problems and their solutions. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B3).

AUTO 510 BASIC HYBRID POWERTRAINS (4)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: AUTO 713 or AUTO 773, and AUTO 751, or equivalent industry experience.

A survey of today’s hybrid vehicle powertrains. Hands-on experience performing scheduled hybrid maintenance services. Introduction to hybrid vehicle diagnosis and repair. Development of entry-level skills needed to work on hybrid vehicles in a professional environment. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 511 PRINCIPLES OF HYBRID AND ELECTRIC DRIVES (7)

Minimum of 104 lecture hours and 24 lab hours/semester.

A comprehensive survey of today’s hybrid vehicle powertrains. Lectures on subjects such as battery packs, power electronics, and electric motor theory are supported by labs covering intermediate and advanced diagnosis of hybrids and/or electric drives. This course is a core requirement of the Hybrid and Electric Drives certificate program. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 824/524 SMOG CHECK INSPECTOR TRAINING LEVEL I (3.5)

Minimum of 56 lecture hours and 16 lab hours/semester.

Intended to provide students with fundamental knowledge of engine and emission control theory, design and operation. Students who successfully complete this course will have met the first of two requirements for the Smog Check Inspector license. This course is not required for students who hold ASE or BAR A6, A8, and L1 certifications. Transfer credit: AUTO 524 – CSU.

AUTO 825/525 SMOG CHECK INSPECTOR TRAINING LEVEL II (2)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 8 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above. Recommended: BAR Specified Criteria: ASE A6, A8 and L1, or Associate Degree/Certificate in Automotive Technology and one year of experience, or two years of experience and BAR Alternative/ASE equivalency training.

Intended to provide students with the knowledge, skills and abilities needed to perform Smog Check inspections. Students who successfully complete this course will have met step two of the Bureau of Automotive Repair's training requirements to qualify to take the Smog Check Inspector state licensing examination if they have met the recommended course preparations. Transfer credit: AUTO 525 – CSU.

AUTO 541 ELECTRICITY AND ELECTRONICS I (2.5)

Minimum of 40 lecture hours and 8 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above

Study of entry level automotive electricity and solid state electronics. Emphasis is placed on the theory of automotive electrical system operational dynamics for both direct and alternating circuits. In addition safe and proper use of digital mulitmeters, digital storage oscilloscopes, starting & charging system testers and capacitance battery testers will be used while testing electrical circuits. Starting and charging system will be covered in detail. This is the first course in a series of three electrical courses that will prepare the student to pass industry standard Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) A6 Electrical certification. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 542 ELECTRICITY AND ELECTRONICS II (2.5)

Minimum of 40 lecture hours and 8 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above. Recommended: AUTO 941/541 or knowledge of basic automotive electrical system operation and circuits.

An in-depth study of electrical diagnosis and repair. Analysis and diagnosis of body electrical schematics and circuitry. Proper and safe usage of the digital multimeter, 12 volt test light, jumper wires, and the digital storage oscilloscope. Proper circuit analysis and troubleshooting techniques. This is the second course in a series of three electrical courses. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 546 BODY CONTROL SYSTEMS (15)

Minimum of 180 lecture hours and 180 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Technology Program. Course topics include heating, cooling and ventilation systems; body controls; scan tool usage and diagnosis; and hybrid theory and operation. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 665 SELECTED TOPICS IN AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY (.5-1.5)

(Pass/No Pass)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours per .5 unit plus lab hours by arrangement.

These short courses are designed for automotive professionals who need to meet current Smog Check licensing requirements and prepare for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification test. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 665S1 OXYGEN/ACETYLENE BASICS FOR THE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICAN Basic oxygen and acetylene operation and torch safety as it relates to automotive. Students will learn safety, maintenance, usage, cutting and brazing. Transfer: CSU.
AUTO 665S2 LIGHT DUTY DIESEL SYSTEMS Course will cover diesel engine operation and emission controls systems. Emphasis will be placed on passenger cars and light duty trucks with a gross vehicle weight under 14,000 lbs. Transfer: CSU.
AUTO 665S3 Honda Express Lube Certification (1.0) (Pass/No Pass.) Designed to teach Honda/Acura specific basic skills necessary to obtain the Honda Express Lube Certification. This course is designed not only to demonstrate the tasks to be learned, but also to give students the opportunity to practice these skills and learn to perform them completely and safely within a given timeframe. Students will be required to complete the online modules and the the test before being awarded the certificate. Transfer: CSU.
AUTO 665S4 2013 SMOG CHECK UPDATE (1.0) A minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Current State of California Smog Check license. A course designed for automotive professionals who need to meet the 2013/2014 Smog Check licensing renewal requirements. Transfer: CSU.
AUTO 665SF - BAR A6 ALTERNATIVE ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONICS TRAINING

This course is approved by the Bureau of Automotive Repair as an alternative to meet the ASE A6 certification requirement for obtaining and maintaining a smog check license. BAR regulations require each student to attend 100% of each course to qualify to take the final examination. Course content will focus on electrical/electronics diagnosis. This topic may be repeated once for credit. NOTE: This course has a non-refundable materials charge of $75.00. Transfer: CSU.

AUTO 665SH - BAR L1 ALTERNATIVE TRAINING

This course is approved by the Bureau of Automotive Repair as an alternative to meet the ASE L1 certification requirement for obtaining and maintaining a smog check license. BAR regulations require each student to attend 100% of each course to qualify to take the final examination. Course content will focus on diagnosis and drivability. This topic may be repeated once for credit. NOTE: This course has a non-refundable materials charge of $75.00. Transfer: CSU.

AUTO 665SM - 2009 SMOG CHECK UPDATE

The 2009 Smog Check update training includes course lectures, homework assignments, laboratory assignments, and a final examination. BAR approved course syllabus and materials will be distributed to the student prior to the start of the course. NOTE: This course has a non-refundable materials charge of $45.00. Transfer: CSU.

2011 SMOG CHECK UPDATE The 2011 Smog Check Update training course includes lecture, homework, laboratory assignments, and a BAR approved final examination. BAR course syllabus and materials will be distributed to students. Transfer: CSU.
AUTO 665SZ BASIC HYBRID POWERTRAINS (1) In this class students will gain practical knowledge related to the maintenance, diagnosis and repair of hybrid vehicles. Case studies and hands-on labs will reinforce key concepts, some of which will also apply to plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer: CSU.
AUTO 680SA BODY CONTROL SYSTEMS (15)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Technology Program by special application only.

Course topics include heating, cooling and ventilation systems, body controls, scan tool usage and diagnosis, and hybrid theory and operation. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 706 TOYOTA ENGINES (6.5)

Lecture/Laboratory total of 160 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Technology program.

This course involves the basic study of engine design and operation including basic measuring, inspection, diagnosis, and repair. Primary emphasis will be on diagnosis and valve train repair. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 707 TOYOTA TRANSMISSIONS (8.5)

Lecture/Laboratory total of 200 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Technology program.

This course involves the basic study of powertrains, including clutches, manual and automatic transmissions and transaxles, and differentials. Primary emphasis will be on testing, diagnosis, and repair. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 708 AUTOMOTIVE PRINCIPLES LAB (1-2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 32 lab hours/semester.

Student is encouraged to perform minor maintenance procedures for own vehicle. A general elective for those desiring a basic knowledge of the automobile. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 709 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE ORIENTATION (2.5)

Minimum of 24 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester.

Entry-level job skills necessary to gain employment in the automotive service industry. Students will learn tire services, oil and filter changes, vehicle lubrication, battery testing, and pre-delivery inspection procedures. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 710 FUNDAMENTALS OF AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY (4)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester.

An introduction to the Automotive Technology program and profession. A survey of the basic tools and fasteners and related mathematics required in automotive service. This course is recommended for those students who desire entrance into the Automotive Technology day program. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 711 AUTOMOTIVE ENTRY LEVEL TECHNICIAN – CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY (8)

Minimum of 96 lecture hours and 96 lab hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 828 or equivalent.

Designed to teach automotive skills, including performing oil changes, safety inspections, fluid flushing procedures, tire inspection and repair, and preparing work orders and recommendations. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 713 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICITY AND ELECTRONICS (15 )

Minimum of 180 lecture hours and 180 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Technology Program.

This course involves the study of electrical fundamentals, electrical test equipment, automotive batteries, starting and charging systems, wiring diagrams, lighting circuits, various advanced body electrical circuits and controls. Primary emphasis on diagnosis, testing and repair. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 716 AUTOMOTIVE COOLING/HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING (5)

Lecture/Laboratory total of 120 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Technology Program.

Theory and operation of cooling, heating, and air conditioning systems. Lab practices include maintenance, testing, diagnosis, and repair of these systems. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 718 - CLEAN AIR CAR II

Required by the Bureau of Automotive Repair for obtaining a Smog Check License. Topics covered include operating an emissions analyzer and dynamometer, performing loaded mode emissions testing, and advanced emission diagnostic strategies. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. NOTE: This course has a non-refundable materials charge of $80.00. Transfer: CSU.

AUTO 721 AUTOMOTIVE STEERING, SUSPENSION AND BRAKES (15)

Minimum of 180 lecture hours and 180 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Technology Program.

A study of automotive steering, suspension and brakes. Emphasis will be placed on the theory, operation, diagnosis and repair of modern braking systems, steering and suspension systems. Topics include: four-wheel steering, tires and wheels, supplemental inflatable restraints, power steering, power and anti-lock braking systems. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 725 TOYOTA BRAKES AND CHASSIS (11)

Lecture/Laboratory total of 270 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Technology program.

This course involves the basic study of mechanical and hydraulic brake systems, steering and suspension systems, tires, and wheel alignment. Emphasis will be on system operation, diagnosis, adjustment, testing, and repair. This course will prepare the student for the California Brake Adjusters License and Automotive Service Excellence (A.S.E.) Examinations. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 727 TOYOTA AIR CONDITIONING (4)

Lecture/Laboratory total of 90 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Technology program.

This course involves the basic study of automotive climate controls and components. Principles of heating and air conditioning and the engine's cooling system will be discussed. The course covers system evacuating, recycling and recharging of the air conditioning system, with emphasis on testing, diagnosis, and repair. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 728 TOYOTA ADVANCED ELECTRICAL (7)

Lecture/Laboratory total of 180 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Technology program.

This course involves the basic study of automotive electronics, body electrical, instrumentation, ignition systems, and basic engine computer controls. Primary emphasis will be on testing, diagnosis, and repair. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 729 TOYOTA ENGINE PERFORMANCE (14.5) (APPROVED CLEAN AIR COURSE)

Lecture/Laboratory total of 344 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Technology program.

This course involves the basic study of ignition systems, fuel systems, emission control, computer control, and driveability diagnostics. Students will receive instruction necessary to take the Automotive Service Excellence examination in the area of Engine Performance. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 730 JAPANESE BASIC ELECTRICAL (8)

Lecture/Laboratory total of 180 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Technology program.

This course involves the basic study of electrical fundamentals, automotive batteries, wiring diagrams, starting and charging systems, and lighting systems. Primary emphasis on testing, diagnosis, and repair. This course will prepare the student for the California Lamp Adjusters License. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 734 AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE DIAGNOSIS AND REPAIR (15)

Minimum of 180 lecture hours and 180 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Technology Program.

A detailed study of various engine designs and materials. Lab will include diagnosis, inspection, repair methods, and parts necessary for complete repair. Also, various machines and machining operations will be covered. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 735 AUTOMOTIVE TRANSMISSION AND DRIVE TRAINS DIAGNOSIS AND REPAIR (15)

Minimum of 180 lecture hours and 180 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Technology Program.

A detailed study of the clutch, standard and automatic transmissions, drive lines and differentials: theory of operation including: friction materials, hydraulics, torque converters, gear trains, planetary gears, and controls as well as gear ratios, torque multiplication, speeds, drive line angles and tooth patterns. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 839/739 OBD II EVAPORATIVE EMISSION SYSTEMS (1.5)

Minimum of 24 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

In-depth study of evaporative emission systems used on OBD II vehicles. Topics include the operation, diagnosis and repair of vacuum decay, leak detection pumps, natural vacuum leak detection, and on-board refueling vapor recovery systems. Transfer credit: AUTO 739 – CSU.

AUTO 743 PRE-DELIVERY SERVICE (.5)

Lecture/Laboratory total of 16 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Technology program.

This course involves the basic study of automotive pre-delivery service (PDS) and routine service procedures including locating rattles, noises, radio and mirror installation, lubrication and other basic service procedures. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 749 ASIAN ENGINE PERFORMANCE (15)

Minimum of 185 lecture hours and 175 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Technology program.

Basic study of ignition systems, fuel systems, emission control, computer control, and driveability diagnostics. Students will receive instruction necessary to take the Automotive Service Excellence examination in the area of Engine Performance. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 751 AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE PERFORMANCE (15)

Minimum of 154 lecture hours and 206 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Technology Program.

A study of the engine sub-systems responsible for good engine performance, clean air, and fuel economy. Systems to be covered include: ignition, fuel, emission, and computer controls. Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 752 ADVANCED ENGINE PERFORMANCE (15)

Minimum of 180 lecture hours and 180 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Technology Program or demonstration of equivalent skills; satisfactory completion of AUTO 751.

An in-depth study of import and domestic computerized engine controls. Emphasis will be placed on the theory, operation, and testing procedures necessary to accurately diagnose and repair driveability complaints. Students will receive instruction necessary to take the State of California test for obtaining a Qualified Test and Repair Mechanic’s License (Smog). Transfer credit: CSU.

AUTO 851/753 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE ADVISING (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

This course involves the basic study of automotive service advising and procedures. Topics include: greeting the customer, writing the initial repair orders, estimating labor charges, revising repair estimates in accordance with California law, conflict resolution, and returning the vehicle to the customer. Transfer credit: AUTO 753 – CSU.

AUTO 854/754 HIGH PERFORMANCE ENGINES I (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

The theory and design of High Performance Engines (Part I). Emphasis is placed on the induction system. Topics discussed include intake and exhaust manifold designs, camshaft design and selection, and cylinder head modifications for maximum efficiency. Transfer credit: AUTO 754 – CSU.

AUTO 855/755 HIGH PERFORMANCE ENGINES II (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above. Recommended: AUTO 854/754.

Theory and design of High Performance Engines (Part II). Emphasis is placed on crankshaft assembly, lubrication and cooling, power measurements, and tuning. Topics include design of pistons, piston rings and pins, connecting rods, crankshafts and bearings. Transfer credit: AUTO 755 – CSU.

AUTO 858/758 AUTOMOTIVE COMPUTER CONTROLS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 16 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of the various inputs, outputs and modes of operation common to most computer controlled systems. General diagnosis will be emphasized using multimeters, lab scopes and scan tools. Students will be introduced to OBD II systems. This course will also assist technicians to prepare for the State of California Smog License and the ASE L1 exams. Transfer credit: AUTO 758 – CSU.

AUTO 865/765 IGNITION SYSTEMS I (1.5)

Minimum of 24 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of automotive ignition systems. Emphasis is placed on the theory, operation, and testing of electronic and distributorless ignition systems. It is recommended that this course be completed prior to enrolling in the Clean Air Car course. Transfer credit: AUTO 765 – CSU.

AUTO 868/768 ON-BOARD DIAGNOSTICS II (OBD-II) (3)

Minimum of 40 lecture hours and 24 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

Tailored for automotive professionals, an in-depth study of generic On-Board Diagnostics II. Content includes history of OBD-II, comparison of OBD-I and OBD-II, J1930 Common Terminology, Flash Programming, Enhanced Monitors, Fuel Trim Strategies, MIL Strategies and Enabling Criteria, Drive Cycles, I/M Readiness flags, and Diagnostic Trouble Codes. Transfer credit: AUTO 768 – CSU.

AUTO 822/769 HEAD AND VALVE SERVICE (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Recommended: Professional experience.

In-depth study of all aspects of cylinder head components, diagnosing, disassembly, repair, reassembly, and use of various tools and equipment. Transfer credit: AUTO 769 – CSU.

AUTO 846/771 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL II (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

An in-depth study of electrical diagnosis and repair. Starting, charging, and other electrical circuits will be discussed. Proper use of test equipment, shop manuals, and wiring diagrams will be included. Transfer credit: AUTO 771 – CSU.

AUTO 772 - CLEAN AIR CAR I (3)

Total of 48 lecture hours plus 8 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: See above.

This course is designed to prepare students for the Bureau of Automotive Repair Smog Check licensing exam. Emphasis is placed on smog check rules and regulations, test procedures, and Test Analyzer System (TAS) machine operation. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: AUTO 772 ' CSU.

NOTE: Any student planning to become a licensed Smog Check Technician should contact the Automotive Department Coordinator at (650) 738-4410 to discuss licensing requirements and course prerequisites mandated by the Bureau of Automotive Repair. It is recommended that this be done prior to enrolling in the Clean Air Car course. This course has a non-refundable materials charge of $40.00.

AUTO 840/773 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL I (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of basic electricity and solid state electronics. Emphasis is placed on the use of analog and digital multimeters required to test electrical circuits and solid state components. Preparation for the State Lamp Test is included. Transfer credit: AUTO 773 – CSU.

AUTO 848/775 OSCILLOSCOPES AND EXHAUST GAS ANALYZERS (1.5)

Total of 24 class hours. Prerequisite: See above.

This course will study automotive oscilloscopes and exhaust gas analyzers. Basic diagnostics will be taught using each machine separately and together to teach the most efficient and accurate troubleshooting methods. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: AUTO 775 ' CSU.

AUTO 830/776 DRIVE LINES AND DIFFERENTIALS (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of the principles and operation of drive lines and differentials. Emphasis will be on measuring and correcting drive line angles, diagnosis, and repair of differentials, and preventive maintenance of these components. Transfer credit: AUTO 776 – CSU.

AUTO 832/777 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS I (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of the operating principles of automatic transmissions and transaxles used on domestic and import vehicles. Power flow and hydraulic/electrical controls will be studied. Preventive maintenance, diagnosis and repair procedures are included. Transfer credit: AUTO 777 – CSU.

AUTO 878/778 MANUAL TRANSMISSIONS I (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A detailed study of the clutch assembly, manual transmissions and transaxles. Topics of study include theory of operation, gear trains and ratios, diagnosis, repair and overhaul. Transfer credit: AUTO 778 – CSU.

AUTO 823/779 BLOCK SERVICE (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of the proper methods of disassembling, measuring, machining and reassembling engine blocks. Various machining equipment, safe working habits, and the handling of waste coolant, oil and oil filters is included. Transfer credit: AUTO 779 – CSU.

AUTO 881/781 ELECTRICAL III (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

Emphasis on applied techniques in schematic reading and diagnosis of various body electrical circuits, including power doors, mirrors, windows and seats; sun roofs; air bags; and semiconductor logic gates. This course builds on the concepts introduced in Electrical I and II. Transfer credit: AUTO 781 – CSU.

AUTO 860/786 AUTOMOTIVE AIR CONDITIONING I (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

Theory and operation of cooling, heating and air conditioning systems. Lab practices include maintenance, testing, diagnosis and repair of these systems. Preparation for the ASE Certification Test is included. Transfer credit: AUTO 786 – CSU.

AUTO 887/787 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS II (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above. Recommended: AUTO 758, AUTO 771, AUTO 773, and AUTO 777; and the ability to use a personal computer to access online training modules and take exams.

Study of diagnosing and problem solving techniques on automatic transmission/transaxle for domestic and import vehicles. A thorough understanding of mechanical power flow, hydraulics, electrical, electronic and computer controls will be emphasized. Hands-on exercises will be used to reinforce all of the classroom theory. Transfer credit: AUTO 787 – CSU.

AUTO 850/790 AUTOMOTIVE BRAKES I (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of automotive braking systems. Emphasis will be placed on the theory of operation, diagnosis, and repair of modern braking systems and their related components. Preparation for the State Brake Test and ASE Certification Test is included. Transfer credit: AUTO 790 – CSU.

AUTO 852/791 AUTOMOTIVE CHASSIS II (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

Study of four wheel alignment and steering geometry, including alignment angle theory, testing and adjustments, with major emphasis on the diagnosis of alignment related problems. It is recommended that AUTO 792/853, Automotive Chassis I, be taken first. Transfer credit: AUTO 791 – CSU.

AUTO 853/792 AUTOMOTIVE CHASSIS I (3)

Total of 48 class hours. Prerequisite: See above.

Study of mounting, balancing, and repair of wheels and tires. In addition, adjustments and repairs of various steering and suspension systems will be covered. Transfer credit: AUTO 792 – CSU.

AUTO 893/793 ENGINE PERFORMANCE (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of the engine sub-systems responsible for good engine performance, clean air, and fuel economy. Topics covered include basic engine and ignition system operation and testing using various diagnostic test equipment. This course can be applied towards the education requirements necessary for eligibility to take the B.A.R. Smog Test. Transfer credit: AUTO 793 – CSU.

AUTO 818 - CLEAN AIR CAR II

Required by the Bureau of Automotive Repair for obtaining a Smog Check License. Topics covered include operating an emissions analyzer and dynamometer, performing loaded mode emissions testing, and advanced emission diagnostic strategies. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. NOTE: This course has a non-refundable materials charge of $80.00. Transfer: CSU.

AUTO 822/769 HEAD AND VALVE SERVICE (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Recommended: Professional experience.

In-depth study of all aspects of cylinder head components, diagnosing, disassembly, repair, reassembly, and use of various tools and equipment. Transfer credit: AUTO 769 – CSU.

AUTO 823/779 BLOCK SERVICE (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of the proper methods of disassembling, measuring, machining and reassembling engine blocks. Various machining equipment, safe working habits, and the handling of waste coolant, oil and oil filters is included. Transfer credit: AUTO 779 – CSU.

AUTO 824 SMOG CHECK INSPECTOR TRAINING LEVEL I (3.5)

:Minimum of 56 lecture hours and 16 lab hours/semester.

Intended to provide students with fundamental knowledge of engine and emission control theory, design and operation. Students who successfully complete this course will have met the first of two requirements for the Smog Check Inspector license. This course is not required for students who hold ASE or BAR A6, A8, and L1 certifications.

AUTO 825/525 SMOG CHECK INSPECTOR TRAINING LEVEL II (2)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 8 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above. Recommended: BAR Specified Criteria: ASE A6, A8 and L1, or Associate Degree/Certificate in Automotive Technology and one year of experience, or two years of experience and BAR Alternative/ASE equivalency training.

Intended to provide students with the knowledge, skills and abilities needed to perform Smog Check inspections. Students who successfully complete this course will have met step two of the Bureau of Automotive Repair's training requirements to qualify to take the Smog Check Inspector state licensing examination if they have met the recommended course preparations. Transfer credit: AUTO 525 – CSU.

AUTO 830/776 DRIVE LINES AND DIFFERENTIALS (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of the principles and operation of drive lines and differentials. Emphasis will be on measuring and correcting drive line angles, diagnosis, and repair of differentials, and preventive maintenance of these components. Transfer credit: AUTO 776 – CSU.

AUTO 832/777 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS I (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of the operating principles of automatic transmissions and transaxles used on domestic and import vehicles. Power flow and hydraulic/electrical controls will be studied. Preventive maintenance, diagnosis and repair procedures are included. Transfer credit: AUTO 777 – CSU.

AUTO 839/739 OBD II EVAPORATIVE EMISSION SYSTEMS (1.5)

Minimum of 24 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

In-depth study of evaporative emission systems used on OBD II vehicles. Topics include the operation, diagnosis and repair of vacuum decay, leak detection pumps, natural vacuum leak detection, and on-board refueling vapor recovery systems. Transfer credit: AUTO 739 – CSU.

AUTO 840/773 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL I (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of basic electricity and solid state electronics. Emphasis is placed on the use of analog and digital multimeters required to test electrical circuits and solid state components. Preparation for the State Lamp Test is included. Transfer credit: AUTO 773 – CSU.

AUTO 842 - CLEAN AIR CAR I (3)

Total of 48 lecture hours plus 8 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: See above.

This course is designed to prepare students for the Bureau of Automotive Repair Smog Check licensing exam. Emphasis is placed on smog check rules and regulations, test procedures, and Test Analyzer System (TAS) machine operation. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: AUTO 772 ' CSU.

NOTE: Any student planning to become a licensed Smog Check Technician should contact the Automotive Department Coordinator at (650) 738-4410 to discuss licensing requirements and course prerequisites mandated by the Bureau of Automotive Repair. It is recommended that this be done prior to enrolling in the Clean Air Car course. This course has a non-refundable materials charge of $40.00.

AUTO 846/771 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL II (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

An in-depth study of electrical diagnosis and repair. Starting, charging, and other electrical circuits will be discussed. Proper use of test equipment, shop manuals, and wiring diagrams will be included. Transfer credit: AUTO 771 – CSU.

AUTO 848/775 OSCILLOSCOPES AND EXHAUST GAS ANALYZERS (1.5)

Total of 24 class hours. Prerequisite: See above.

This course will study automotive oscilloscopes and exhaust gas analyzers. Basic diagnostics will be taught using each machine separately and together to teach the most efficient and accurate troubleshooting methods. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: AUTO 775 ' CSU.

AUTO 850/790 AUTOMOTIVE BRAKES I (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of automotive braking systems. Emphasis will be placed on the theory of operation, diagnosis, and repair of modern braking systems and their related components. Preparation for the State Brake Test and ASE Certification Test is included. Transfer credit: AUTO 790 – CSU.

AUTO 851/753 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE ADVISING (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

This course involves the basic study of automotive service advising and procedures. Topics include: greeting the customer, writing the initial repair orders, estimating labor charges, revising repair estimates in accordance with California law, conflict resolution, and returning the vehicle to the customer. Transfer credit: AUTO 753 – CSU.

AUTO 852/791 AUTOMOTIVE CHASSIS II (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

Study of four wheel alignment and steering geometry, including alignment angle theory, testing and adjustments, with major emphasis on the diagnosis of alignment related problems. It is recommended that AUTO 792/853, Automotive Chassis I, be taken first. Transfer credit: AUTO 791 – CSU.

AUTO 853/792 AUTOMOTIVE CHASSIS I (3)

Total of 48 class hours. Prerequisite: See above.

Study of mounting, balancing, and repair of wheels and tires. In addition, adjustments and repairs of various steering and suspension systems will be covered. Transfer credit: AUTO 792 – CSU.

AUTO 854/754 HIGH PERFORMANCE ENGINES I (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

The theory and design of High Performance Engines (Part I). Emphasis is placed on the induction system. Topics discussed include intake and exhaust manifold designs, camshaft design and selection, and cylinder head modifications for maximum efficiency. Transfer credit: AUTO 754 – CSU.

AUTO 855/755 HIGH PERFORMANCE ENGINES II (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above. Recommended: AUTO 854/754.

Theory and design of High Performance Engines (Part II). Emphasis is placed on crankshaft assembly, lubrication and cooling, power measurements, and tuning. Topics include design of pistons, piston rings and pins, connecting rods, crankshafts and bearings. Transfer credit: AUTO 755 – CSU.

AUTO 858/758 AUTOMOTIVE COMPUTER CONTROLS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 16 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of the various inputs, outputs and modes of operation common to most computer controlled systems. General diagnosis will be emphasized using multimeters, lab scopes and scan tools. Students will be introduced to OBD II systems. This course will also assist technicians to prepare for the State of California Smog License and the ASE L1 exams. Transfer credit: AUTO 758 – CSU.

AUTO 860/786 AUTOMOTIVE AIR CONDITIONING I (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

Theory and operation of cooling, heating and air conditioning systems. Lab practices include maintenance, testing, diagnosis and repair of these systems. Preparation for the ASE Certification Test is included. Transfer credit: AUTO 786 – CSU.

AUTO 865/765 IGNITION SYSTEMS I (1.5)

Minimum of 24 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of automotive ignition systems. Emphasis is placed on the theory, operation, and testing of electronic and distributorless ignition systems. It is recommended that this course be completed prior to enrolling in the Clean Air Car course. Transfer credit: AUTO 765 – CSU.

AUTO 868/768 ON-BOARD DIAGNOSTICS II (OBD-II) (3)

Minimum of 40 lecture hours and 24 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

Tailored for automotive professionals, an in-depth study of generic On-Board Diagnostics II. Content includes history of OBD-II, comparison of OBD-I and OBD-II, J1930 Common Terminology, Flash Programming, Enhanced Monitors, Fuel Trim Strategies, MIL Strategies and Enabling Criteria, Drive Cycles, I/M Readiness flags, and Diagnostic Trouble Codes. Transfer credit: AUTO 768 – CSU.

AUTO 878/778 MANUAL TRANSMISSIONS I (2)

Minimum of 36 lecture hours and 12 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A detailed study of the clutch assembly, manual transmissions and transaxles. Topics of study include theory of operation, gear trains and ratios, diagnosis, repair and overhaul. Transfer credit: AUTO 778 – CSU.

AUTO 881/781 ELECTRICAL III (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

Emphasis on applied techniques in schematic reading and diagnosis of various body electrical circuits, including power doors, mirrors, windows and seats; sun roofs; air bags; and semiconductor logic gates. This course builds on the concepts introduced in Electrical I and II. Transfer credit: AUTO 781 – CSU.

AUTO 887/787 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS II (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above. Recommended: AUTO 758, AUTO 771, AUTO 773, and AUTO 777; and the ability to use a personal computer to access online training modules and take exams.

Study of diagnosing and problem solving techniques on automatic transmission/transaxle for domestic and import vehicles. A thorough understanding of mechanical power flow, hydraulics, electrical, electronic and computer controls will be emphasized. Hands-on exercises will be used to reinforce all of the classroom theory. Transfer credit: AUTO 787 – CSU.

AUTO 893/793 ENGINE PERFORMANCE (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above.

A study of the engine sub-systems responsible for good engine performance, clean air, and fuel economy. Topics covered include basic engine and ignition system operation and testing using various diagnostic test equipment. This course can be applied towards the education requirements necessary for eligibility to take the B.A.R. Smog Test. Transfer credit: AUTO 793 – CSU.

AUTO 941 ELECTRICITY AND ELECTRONICS I (2.5)

Minimum of 40 lecture hours and 8 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above

Study of entry level automotive electricity and solid state electronics. Emphasis is placed on the theory of automotive electrical system operational dynamics for both direct and alternating circuits. In addition safe and proper use of digital mulitmeters, digital storage oscilloscopes, starting & charging system testers and capacitance battery testers will be used while testing electrical circuits. Starting and charging system will be covered in detail. This is the first course in a series of three electrical courses that will prepare the student to pass industry standard Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) A6 Electrical certification.

AUTO 942 ELECTRICITY AND ELECTRONICS II (2.5)

Minimum of 40 lecture hours and 8 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: See above. Recommended: AUTO 941/541 or knowledge of basic automotive electrical system operation and circuits.

An in-depth study of electrical diagnosis and repair. Analysis and diagnosis of body electrical schematics and circuitry. Proper and safe usage of the digital multimeter, 12 volt test light, jumper wires, and the digital storage oscilloscope. Proper circuit analysis and troubleshooting techniques. This is the second course in a series of three electrical courses.

BCM. 171 FEDERAL INCOME TAX (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 32 hours by arrangement/semester.

Preparation of Federal and California income tax returns for individuals; basic income tax law, theory and practice. Students who successfully complete this course may apply to the CTEC, the California Tax Education Council, to become a Registered Tax Preparer in California. Also listed as ACTG 171. Transfer credit: CSU.

BCM. 172 BUSINESS INCOME TAXES (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture plus 32 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: ACTG 100 or ACTG 121, or equivalent; and ACTG 171 or equivalent.

Preparation of Federal and California income tax returns for corporations, partnerships and sole proprietorships. Completion of ACTG 172 will enable students to complete most tax returns required of professional tax preparers. . Also listed as ACTG 172. Transfer credit: CSU.

BCM. 402 HTML & WEB AUTHORING APPLICATIONS (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Recommended: BCM. 104 or equivalent.

Basics of developing a Web site through using the most current version of web authoring software and HTML. Topics include discussion of HTML, site layout principles, usability, CSS, spry elements, media, and interaction in web pages. The course concludes with testing, maintenance, and publishing of a final Web site. Transfer credit: CSU.

BCM. 665S3 ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR CS5: CREATIVE PRINT AND WEB DESIGN FOR NON-DESIGNERS (1.5) (Pass/No Pass.) An introduction to Illustrator basics beginning with the work interface. Beginners will develop hands-on experience using paths, points, curves, strokes and fills to create and manipulate shapes. Explore the new CS5 brush and graphic libraries while you design print and web image projects. A final portfolio will allow students to demonstrate creative design of print and web images including: business logos, brochures, a unique business card, birthday or special holiday gift cards, poster, scrapbook layouts and more. Transfer credit: CSU.
BCM. 665SE VOLUNTEER INCOME TAX PREPARATION (2)

(Pass/No Pass).

Minimum of 24 lecture hours and 24 lab hours/semester.

Instruction on Income Tax theory and computer usage in the preparation of Income Tax returns for the IRS VITA program. Also listed as BCM. 665SE. Transfer credit: CSU.

BIOL 101 OUR BIOLOGICAL WORLD (4)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Study of biology as it relates to humans and their environment, with special emphasis on ecological interrelationships, evolution and genetics, and topics of current importance. Recommended for non-science majors to fulfill laboratory science transfer requirement. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 110 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY (4)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent..

Using natural selection and physiological survival as a unifying theme, this course deals with the basic problems common to all living systems, and compares the functional solution that various organisms have evolved, illuminating the unity in diversity that characterizes life on earth. Recommended for non-science majors to fulfill laboratory science transfer requirement. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 111 NATURAL HISTORY OF CALIFORNIA (4)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester with frequent field trips. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Students will investigate the functioning of ecosystems, adaptations of organisms to their environment and natural history of selected organisms. Students will become familiar with natural ecosystems of California, with a primary focus on the San Francisco Bay Area. Laboratory and field investigations will be conducted using the scientific method; critical thinking skills will be emphasized. Recommended for non-science majors to fulfill laboratory science transfer requirements. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 130 HUMAN BIOLOGY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

A course designed to provide students with an appreciation of the structure, function, and development of their own bodies. Topics include an introduction to science and to scientific methods of investigation, and some elementary chemistry (no previous background necessary) as a basis for understanding human functions such as digestion, circulation, reproduction and other systems. Some diseases and other causes of body malfunction are discussed. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2).

BIOL 140 ANIMALS, PEOPLE AND ENVIRONMENT (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

This course will familiarize the student with the methods and importance of behavioral investigation in animals. Emphasis on past and current human-animal relationships, the impact on animal populations and increasing need for wildlife protection. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2).

BIOL 145 PLANTS, PEOPLE AND ENVIRONMENT (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent..

A survey of plants emphasizing those aspects of plant biology that have affected the lives of people. Topics include: the success and failure of modern agriculture; the impact of humans on the environment; and the importance of plants in solving critical problems of hunger and conservation of energy. Attention is given to modes of inquiry or ways in which scientists carry out their investigations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2).

BIOL 150 INTRODUCTION TO MARINE BIOLOGY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent..

A non-technical introduction to the scientific method used in studies of marine biology. Major emphasis is given to the natural history of marine animals and plants and their relationship with the oceanic environment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2).

BIOL 170 PRINCIPLES OF APPLIED BIOSCIENCE (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

A survey of the principles that govern the living world, from molecules to cells and tissues, to organs and whole organisms, to populations and ecosystems, to the entire biosphere. Special emphasis is placed upon experimental approaches, current issues, and practical application of the scientific method and biological principles to issues affecting public health, agriculture, and socioeconomic change. Current news and developments in relevant areas of biological sciences and biotechnology will be reviewed and discussed. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2).

BIOL 171 LABORATORY PRINCIPLES OF APPLIED BIOSCIENCE (1)

Minimum of 48 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 170. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Laboratory course introducing students to practical methods in preparing materials, reagents and media for conducting biological investigations and products of genetic engineering. Students will learn to measure and prepare solutions of various concentrations and pH, how to use basic chemistry and biological instrumentation such as digital scales, pipettes and micropipettes, centrifuges, and vertical and horizontal electrophoresis apparatuses. Students will plan and conduct biological experiments using the scientific method and employing modern laboratory methods and instrumentation. Data will be analyzed using spreadsheet software for tabulation and graphing. Teamwork, responsible lab technique, and proper and thorough notebook keeping will be emphasized. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B3).

BIOL 215 ORGANISMAL BIOLOGY: CORE I (5)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 96 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: MATH 120 or MATH 123, or appropriate math placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

As part of a two-course core program, BIOL 215 is an introductory survey of organismal form and function. Analysis of fundamental biological functions including nutrition, gas exchange, reproduction, natural selection, and ecology using representative living organisms. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 230 INTRODUCTION TO CELL BIOLOGY: CORE II (5)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 96 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 210; and BIOL 210 (College of San Mateo), or 215, or 220 (College of San Mateo), or 225 (Cañada College).Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

As part of a two-course core program, BIOL 230 is an introduction to life functions as seen at the cellular level; cellular structure, macromolecular architecture and function, cellular energetics, chemical regulation, photochemical activities, molecular genetics, and genetic engineering. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 240 GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY (4)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a college-level laboratory science course. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Morphology, taxonomy, ecology and physiology of microorganisms, with emphasis on bacteria. Laboratory techniques on culture and identification of bacteria. Recommended for agriculture, biochemistry, nursing, pre-medical and pre-dental, biotechnology engineering, and other life science majors. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 250 HUMAN ANATOMY (4)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or BIOL 110 or BIOL 130, or equivalent; and completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 100 or equivalent; and completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 120 or equivalent.

Students learn the gross and microscopic structure of the human body through lecture and laboratory study of dissections, histology slides, anatomy models, and prosected human cadavers. This course is intended for students in allied health areas such as nursing, radiologic technology, respiratory therapy, surgical technology, physical therapy, hygiene, and physical education. This course is an elective for pre-dental, pre-medical, and pre-veterinary students. Recommended for general life science, respiratory therapy and physical education majors. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 260 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY (5)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 96 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: BIOL 250 or equivalent; and CHEM 192, or CHEM 210, or CHEM 410, or equivalent; and completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 100 or equivalent; and completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 120 or equivalent.

Students learn through lecture and laboratory experiences how the organ systems function in maintaining homeostasis – regulating change and growth processes in humans. Recommended for students in allied health areas such as nursing, physical therapy, respiratory therapy, radiology, and related fields such as physical education and psychology. This course is an elective for pre-dental and pre-medical students. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2, B3).

BIOL 365 INTERTIDAL INTERPRETATION (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus field trips.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the major life forms of the intertidal zone of the California coast, their taxonomic groupings, common names, basic anatomical and physiological characteristics and their role in the ecosystem. Transfer credit: CSU.

BIOL 415 INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY MANUFACTURING (9)

A total of 96 lecture hours and 144 lab hours plus 32 hours by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and eligibility for MATH 110 or MATH 111, or equivalent.

An introductory course to prepare students who possess transferable skills from other occupations for entry-level positions in the biotechnology industry. Course instruction will include basic skills in biology, biomanufacturing, chemistry, and an introduction to biotechnology careers. Transfer credit: CSU.

BIOL 422 FOUNDATIONS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Overview of the origin and development of biotechnology and the bioscience industries. Includes cell growth, career opportunities, and medical and food products. Also includes laboratory experience with bioreactors and making products. Transfer credit: CSU.

BIOL 426 GENETIC ENGINEERING (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

This course will examine how genes work and how they can be manipulated and cloned. Topics include DNA and protein synthesis, genetic engineering, and DNA fingerprinting. Also includes laboratory experience with DNA analyses: RFLP and PCR. Transfer credit: CSU.

BIOL 430 INTRODUCTION TO IMMUNOLOGY (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

This course will examine the immune system and how it protects us from disease. Topics include vaccine and antiserum production by traditional methods and by genetic engineering. Also includes laboratory experience with laboratory techniques. Transfer credit: CSU.

BIOL 432 FERMENTATION TECHNOLOGY (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Overview of the origin and development of industrial fermentations. Course will use fermentation of beverages, food ingredients, enzymes, chemicals and pharmaceuticals to demonstrate microbial metabolism.

BIOL 665 SELECTED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours per .5 unit.

This course is designed to develop specific skills, techniques or concepts that are appropriate to biology and/or biotechnology. The course will focus on one specific topic; for example, new or leading edge developments in biotechnology. Transfer credit: CSU.

BIOL 675 HONORS COLLOQUIUM IN BIOLOGY (1)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in any non-Honors biology level 100 or 200 course.

Readings, discussion, lectures and activities covering selected advanced topics in biology to be determined by the Biology Department and the Honors Program. Honors credit will be earned for both Biology 675 and the concurrently enrolled course. Transfer credit: CSU.

ART 695 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BIOL (0.5-3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Designed for students who are interested in furthering their knowledge via self-paced, individualized instruction provided in selected areas or directed study to be arranged with instructor and approved by the division dean using the Independent Study Form. Varying modes of instruction can be used -- laboratory, research, skill development, etc. For each unit earned, students are required to devote three hours per week throughout the semester. Students may take only one Independent Study course within a given discipline. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 100 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

A basic orientation course in business designed to develop an understanding of the role of business in the economy and as an aid in selecting a field of vocational specialization. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

BUS. 101 HUMAN RELATIONS AT WORK (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

The application of basic principles in the behavioral sciences to practical problems of personal growth, self-management, and the development of healthy, productive interpersonal relationships, including those typically encountered at work. Transfer credit: CSU (D3).

BUS. 103 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: BCM. 104 or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

An introduction to computer systems and software applications and their impact on the business environment. Topics include computer architecture, hardware, software, computer terminology and theory. Students use software applications as problem solving tools for business projects. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

BUS. 109 WORKING WITH PEOPLE WORLDWIDE (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the differences in business dealings and working environments on an international basis. Emphasis is on understanding culture, society, management styles, and the work ethic in various countries. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 111 CRASH COURSE TO SUCCESS IN ONLINE LEARNING (1)

(Offered online only.)(Pass/No Pass.)

A total of sixteen lecture hours plus four lab hours by arrangement.

This course provides students with basic knowledge and skills required to become a successful online student. Topics include the characteristics and challenges of online learning, learning styles, the taxonomy of online courses, online learning strategies, technical skills, online test-taking skills, and time and stress management in an online learning environment. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 115 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: MATH 811 or equivalent.

A study of mathematics as applied to business, with emphasis on word problems involving interest, discount, negotiable instruments, financial statements and ratios, inventory pricing, depreciation, payroll, income tax, annuities, and amortization. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 120 MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS FOR BUSINESS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: MATH 120 or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

To give students the mathematical tools they will need to succeed in the core courses in the business curriculum at the state universities. Includes an introduction to calculus, including applications; probability, including expected monetary value and decision making; and mathematics of finance, including amortization. Transfer credit: UC, CSU (B4).

BUS. 123 STATISTICS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: MATH 120 or equivalent. Recommended: BUS. 120; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Introduction to descriptive techniques and methods of inference. Includes classification of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, normal curve, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression analysis, and trend analysis. Also provides an introduction to probability and probability distributions. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B4).

BUS. 150 ENTREPRENEURSHIP – SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Completion of MATH 811; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

For potential or present entrepreneurs. Emphasis on organization and operation of a small business in the political, social and economic environment. Includes problems of raising capital, establishing an effective business plan, marketing, and directing and motivating employees. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 153 PLANNING A BUSINESS STARTUP (2-3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of sixteen lecture hours per unit.

This course presents practical procedures for planning the opening of a new small business. Topics include determining whether one is a 'good fit' for an entrepreneurial career, 'profit objectives,' constructing capital budgets, realities of finding financing, elementary accrual-basis accounting, profit margin analysis, projecting cash flows and accrual profits, and market research. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 190 RETAILING, E-COMMERCE AND BUYING (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Completion of BUS. 115 or MATH 811; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

General overview of retailing, which includes an introduction to buying, pricing, sales promotion, store management and organization, retail calculations, retail salesmanship, and service policies. Topics include computer-generated sales and advertising. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 200 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Introduction to strategy and management of international business. Topics will include international trade theory and how companies develop competitive advantage in international markets, marketing, production and financial management, the organization of human resources, and management of risk. Transfer credit: CSU (D3).

BUS. 201 BUSINESS LAW (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Origin, development and functions of the law and the legal environment with the objective of promoting a general understanding of legal reasoning. Framework within which the judicial process takes place. Legal problems pertaining to contracts and related topics, sales, and the impact of law on economic enterprise. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (See counselor for exceptions).

BUS. 210 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (1.5)

Minimum of 24 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

This course introduces and examines the practical aspects of international trade finance. The course includes topics such as different types of lenders, domestic and foreign government assistance programs for trade assistance, methods of payment, trade financing, and managing risks in international trade finance. Transfer credit: CSU (D3).

BUS. 221 INTERCULTURAL BUSINESS COMMUNICATION (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

This course introduces and examines the practical aspects of intercultural business communication. The course includes topics in the nature, pattern and comparisons of intercultural business communication, business and social customs, intercultural negotiation practice and strategies, communication in intercultural and international contexts, and region-specific business cultures. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 225 FOUNDATIONS OF GLOBAL E-COMMERCE (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours and 8 lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 or equivalent.

This course introduces the fundamentals of electronic commerce. Students will learn how to conduct and manage e-commerce and the major applications, opportunities and limitations in both domestic and international business. Topics include e-payment transactions; legal, taxation and privacy issues; and globalization in e-commerce. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 226 GLOBAL BUSINESS NEGOTIATION (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Introduction to the skills necessary to conduct successful negotiations and application of these skills in domestic and international settings. Students will learn the essentials of effective negotiating techniques and explore the elements of cultural diversity that come into play and affect negotiations among international parties. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 227 GLOBAL BUSINESS CONTRACTS (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours and 8 lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 or equivalent.

Introduction to commercial agreements between parties trading across international borders. Topics include commercial contracts, quality control, compliance with government regulations, protection of intellectual property rights, dispute resolution, negotiations, performance, and contract enforcement. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 230 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

An in-depth analysis of the economic, cultural, political and legal environments in which domestic and international marketing occurs. It is designed to examine marketing functions and their adaptations to those environments, such as identification of target market and development of product, promotion, price and place (four P’s). The course will introduce a set of conceptual and analytical tools to teach students to apply the “Four P’s” to international marketing, which reflect the swift changes of an expanding competitive global market as well as technology’s impact on the international market arena. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 240 INTERNATIONAL LOGISTICS AND TRANSPORTATION (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A total of twenty-four lecture hours plus eight lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 or equivalent.

Introduction to the practical aspects of international transportation and logistics and their role in international trade. Topics included are international transportation, logistics, customs regulations, documentation, port and facility operations, and inventory management. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 241 DOING BUSINESS IN ASIA (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 8 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Exploration of business strategies in the Asia-Pacific region. Students will learn how and why business strategies are pursued by multinational corporations doing business in Asia. Students will gain a better insight into the business environment and business protocol in Asia. Topics include business environmental analysis, strategy formulation, strategy implementation and control, and profiles of Japan, Korea, China, Singapore and Hong Kong. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 242 DOING BUSINESS IN EUROPE (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours and 8 lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 or equivalent.

Analysis of the business culture of European countries. Students will learn the major components of the current economic, political and cultural reality of the European nations in order to develop the knowledge and understanding essential to conducting successful business dealings in Europe. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 243 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 8 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Introductory course to explore various topics related to the legal implications the financial, economic, cultural and political environment of international business. Through analysis of case students and skill-building activities, students will develop a theoretical, practical approach to doing business as a multinational company in a global environment. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 244 DOING BUSINESS IN LATIN AMERICA (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours and 8 lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 or equivalent.

This course covers the practical aspects of doing business in Latin America. Students will gain additional insight into business protocol and tactics of Latin America. Topics include political, economic, cultural and business environments; opportunity analysis; trade agreements; business strategy; and country and regional profiles of Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America, and South America. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 245 INTRODUCTION TO CUSTOMS BROKERAGE (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours and 8 lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 or equivalent.

Introduction to the basic regulations, procedures and documentation required in customs brokerage. The course will provide students with basic knowledge and insight into U.S. Customs Brokerage and the Customs Broker examination. Topics include procedures of U.S. customs entry, clearance, documentation, classification, valuation, tariffs, quotas, duty rates, restrictions, prohibitions, and regulations. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 246 DOING BUSINESS IN CHINA (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 12 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

A comprehensive study of Chinese business operations and challenges in dealing with cultural differences, negotiation styles, and business operations. Student will apply practical guidelines in conducting successful negotiations and business ventures with Chinese counterparts. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 248 ASIAN MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

A comparative study of Asian management systems, such as organizational structures, competitive strategies, and cultural influences within Asia and the western world. Students will learn the influence of Confucianism, strategic thinking and traditions on Asian management systems, and practical guidelines for working with Asian counterparts for successful business ventures. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 249 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL LOGISTICS FOR CUSTOMS BROKERS AND FREIGHT FORWARDERS (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.

Introduction to international purchase-sale agreement negotiations, use of Incoterms, foreign exchange and collections, international supply chains and cargo transportation, and cargo risk management. Students will perform entry-level operational tasks related to the overall trade and logistics process. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 258 CUSTOMS BROKER SERVICES AND REGULATIONS (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.

Custom brokers’ relationship with importers, government agencies and transportation carriers, government import requirements and restrictions, broker work-flow and customs “entries.” Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 261 CUSTOMS ADMISSIBILITY, CLASSIFICATION, VALUE AND ENTRY (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.

U.S. import admissibility, tariff classification and value, how to prepare a customs entry, and additional processing required for certain types of products. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 262 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AND CARGO TRANSPORTATION (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.

International freight forwarding, shipper-forwarder and forwarder-carrier relationships, government regulations, cargo transportation modes, carriers, rates (charges) and liability; shipper responsibility for cargo preparation and loading; cargo insurance and claims; and HazMat shipping requirements. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 263 U.S. EXPORT AND DESTINATION COUNTRY IMPORT REQUIREMENTS; FOREIGN COLLECTIONS (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.

U.S. export laws and regulations, including export restrictions and declarations; general requirements for importation into foreign countries, including documentation that forwarders prepare and how forwarders become involved with foreign bank collections and letters of credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 267 OCEAN FORWARDER AND NVOCC REGULATION, OPERATIONS AND WORK-FLOW (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.

Government regulation of ocean forwarders and NVOCCs, shipping line vessels and services, door-to-door shipment of intermodal containers; how to prepare an ocean bill of lading, including method of consignment; carrier liability for cargo losses; operational tasks and process steps in an ocean forwarder transaction; and NVOCC operations. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 268 AIR FORWARDER OPERATIONS AND WORK-FLOW (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.

Air cargo characteristics, routing, limitations, documentation, shipment preparation, air forwarder services and transaction process steps, air cargo consolidation, and key business issues. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 269 WAREHOUSING AND LOGISTICS (4)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester.

Introduces students to warehouse operations and logistics. Topics include warehousing, software information systems used in warehousing, and warehouse safety. The class will include hands-on activities in relation to logistics and warehousing. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 279 IMPORT/EXPORT MANAGEMENT (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

An overview of the practical aspects of import/export procedures with an emphasis on small- to medium-sized companies. The complete international trading transactions will be covered, including sourcing, financing, freight forwarding, payment methods, international commercial terms, and documentation. Transfer credit: CSU.

:BUS. 284 PURCHASING AND SUPPLY MANAGEMENT (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.

Introduction to the basic principles of purchasing and supply chain management; its authority, responsibility, and expectations. Emphasis on understanding the purchasing and supply processes, organizational concepts, policy, price and value analysis, and effects of purchasing functions on a company’s profit or loss. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 285 INVENTORY MANAGEMENT (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: BCM. 200 or equivalent.

:Introduction to inventory and materials management. Topics include inventory and materials management: types of inventory, forecasting and market analysis, types of demand systems, inventory changes, single order quantities, in-process and just-in-time inventory, distribution inventory systems, inventory control, valuation and measurement, simulation, and aggregate inventory control. The course will include hands-on activities in relation to inventory management. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 286 TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Introduction to basic transportation concepts and the relevance of transportation in our economy. Characteristics of each mode of transportation including rail, highway, carrier pricing, pipelines, air and water will be discussed and evaluated. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 290 INTRODUCTION TO MARKETING STRATEGY (1.5)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or equivalent.

Examination of how a clear, well-defined marketing strategy influences every aspect of a business and helps it gain competitive advantage. Topics include buyer behavior, segmentation, targeting, positioning, differentiation, and other tools crucial to business success. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 291 MARKETING TACTICS (1.5)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours. Prerequisite: BUS. 290. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or equivalent.

Introduction to current marketing tactics used to attract and retain customers. Topics include product ideas and product lifecycles, setting prices, choosing distribution channels, tools of marketing promotion, and business tactics in a global age. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 292 INTRODUCTION TO MARKETING PROMOTIONS (1.5)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours. Prerequisite: BUS. 290. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or equivalent.

Introduction to the methods of marketing promotion and how companies use them to communicate with target customers and audiences. Topics include advertising, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, and personal selling. Students learn how to prepare a unified, high-impact promotional campaign about a company or product. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 293 INTERNET MARKETING STRATEGIES (1.5)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours. Prerequisite: BUS. 290. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or equivalent.

An introduction to Internet marketing strategies. Explanation of the steps to integrate the Internet into the overall business plan of a small company and how to plan an effective business website. Topics include Internet technologies, developing an e-commerce strategy, what to consider before designing a website, and what to expect from going online. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 296 NEW ECONOMY MARKETING (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.

Overview of marketing trends in the new economy that includes: social media, branding new economy businesses, social responsibility and sustainability as marketing initiatives, small business “guerrilla” marketing, customer relationship marketing, demographics and psychographics and targeting as a strategy for localized marketing. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 297 BUSINESS PLANNING FOR SUCCESS (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester.

Conceive, develop and present a business plan that supports an entrepreneurial or small business idea. Work along side other students as you learn about and implement a successful business plan. This capstone event to E-ship courses will culminate in a competition with other student?s business plans. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 352 INTRODUCTION TO INSURANCE (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 16 lecture hours.

An introduction to the modern property/casualty insurance system, including insurance products and services distribution, insurance company departments, reinsurance, large property and high liability values/limits, civil laws, tort, contract, basic commercial and personal ISO insurance contracts, and risk management. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 353 PROPERTY & LIABILITY INSURANCE PRINCIPLES (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or equivalent, and BUS. 352.

A comprehensive study of property and liability insurance divided into three segments: 1) insurance fundamentals, types of insurers, insurance institutions, insurance regulation, and financial performance measurement; 2) insurance operations, marketing, underwriting, and claims; and 3) insurance contracts, loss exposure, and risk management. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 400 BUSINESS ENGLISH (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

A comprehensive review of English as used by employers. Business-oriented materials are used; areas covered include grammar, punctuation, capitalization, spelling and vocabulary. Designed for anyone who must communicate in writing in a business environment. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 401 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or equivalent.

Development of writing and communication skills for a variety of business situations. Students develop current business communication technology skills including writing, presenting, and delivering information. Emphasis is on planning, organizing, composing, and revising business documents using word processing software for written documents and presentation-graphics software to create and deliver professional-level oral reports. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 443 LAW OFFICE PROCEDURES (1-3)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 24 lab hours by arrangement per unit. Prerequisites: BCM. 212 or 214 and BUS. 400 or equivalent skills. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Intensive training in procedures applicable to secretarial duties in law offices. Emphasis on legal terminology, legal documents and correspondence, dictation, and transcription. Also listed as LEGL 443. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 445 LAW OFFICE MANAGEMENT (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: BCM. 212 or 214, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Introduction to the fundamentals of law office administration, personnel management, and accounting operations. Designed to familiarize legal paraprofessionals (legal secretaries, paralegals and law office clerks) with the practical inner workings of a law office, including an understanding of law office fundamentals. Law office management goes beyond analyzing mere productivity and includes being sensitive to ethical concerns and providing quality legal services to clients. Also listed as LEGL 445. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 476 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 24 lab hours by arrangement/semester.

An introductory course designed to provide students with an overview of medical office procedures. Students will learn how to manage patients in emergency situations; receive, register and schedule patients; organize and sustain medical records; medical billing; health insurance; business operations; human resource functions; and financial management. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 485 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Designed to give students a basic background in medical terminology as used by medical transcriptionists, court reporters, law related occupations, and allied health occupations. The prefixes, roots, and suffixes of commonly used medical words are presented. Proper names of anatomical structures and their relationship to each other are covered by body system. Also listed as HSCI 484. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 486 MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION (4)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in BUS. 485/HSCI 484; ability to type 50 net wpm. Recommended: ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Intensive training in medical transcription that includes doctor-dictated history and physicals, surgical reports, operative procedures, x-ray, pathology, and nuclear medicine reports. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 487 MEDICAL TRANSCRIBER INTERNSHIP (1-4)

Minimum of 51 hours per unit. Prerequisites: BUS. 485 and 486, or equivalent.

On-the-job training in a hospital or medical office in transcribing actual doctor dictation from cassettes. Individual conferences with instructor. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 489 MEDICAL CODING ICD-9 (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 24 lab hours by arrangement/semester.

A course covering ICD-9 coding, a national classification of coding that encompasses diseases, ailments, injuries and disorders for all the major and minor body systems. This course includes, but is not limited to, hospital inpatient, outpatient and ambulatory care coding emphasizing specific and correct procedures to accurately achieve maximum reimbursement. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 491 MEDICAL CODING CPT (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 24 lab hours by arrangement/semester.

A course covering CPT coding, a national classification of coding that encompasses evaluation management, surgical, and primary care procedures performed in a medical office. The course includes, but is not limited to, hospital inpatient, outpatient, and ambulatory care coding emphasizing specific and correct procedures to accurately achieve maximum reimbursement with the coordination of ICD-9 codes. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 499 COMPUTERIZED MEDICAL BILLING AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 48 lab hours by arrangement/semester.

An integrated, computerized approach to develop knowledge and skills for accurate processing of medical billing and information management for a medical office. Topics include: data entry, billing/collection procedures, processing patient and insurance information, scheduling appointments, processing insurance claims, report generation, and composing and editing medical documents. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 665 SELECTED TOPICS IN BUSINESS (.5 or 1 or 1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours for each .5 unit.

This course is designed to develop specific skills that are utilized in business settings. The course will focus on one specific topic; for example, a specific software package, telephone techniques, time management, human relations skills, small business management, etc. Transfer credit: CSU.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT SERIES (1.0)

This course is intended for students new to international business and/or interested in exploring opportunities in international business. Course will cover the various decision-making levels to become an entrepreneur and includes the development of a business plan, choosing marketing strategies, financing options, creating a profitable business, differences between starting a regular business and starting an international business, legal and cultural issues, selling goods/services, international logistics, and getting paid. Emphasis will be on trade opportunities in the Middle East and North Africa. Orientation meeting on Saturday, June 19, from 9:00 – 10:00 am in Room 6202 – attendance required. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 665SD YOUTH ENTREPRENEURSHIP (1.5) Introduction and exposure to entrepreneurship and small business management. Students will learn the traits of successful entrepreneurs and how to create a business from the ground up, including the components of a business plan, securing financing, and basic marketing. A core component of the course will be site visits to local small businesses and interaction with small business owners. Students will leave the course with a solid understanding of how a business is created, the roles and responsibilities at various levels of management/employment, and the next steps necessary to further their education. Transfer: CSU.
FUNDAMENTALS OF IMPORTING AND EXPORTING Basic understanding of importing into and exporting out of the United States. Designed to provide an awareness of the many regulations, laws, processes, and principles involved in global trade from the perspective of the United States. Transfer credit: CSU.
BUS. 665SF CHINESE BUSINESS COMMUNICATION – LANGUAGE APPLICATION, CULTURE AND BUSINESS ETIQUETTE (1.5) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 24 lecture hours/semester. Provides practical aspects of real world Chinese business application, business etiquette and Chinese culture. Students will learn the essential elements of working in and doing business with contemporary China. Students will also gain insights into today's Chinese negotiation styles and expectations. The course will engage students in communicative, integrated and interactive activities. Students will benefit greatly from this crash course in preparation for ventures in China. Transfer credit: CSU.
BUS. 665SH PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A basic orientation course in personal financial planning designed to develop an understanding of the role of personal finances as an aid in developing healthy financial habits. An exploration of the practical aspects of financial planning principles and theories with an emphasis on how to apply these principles in your own life. Topics include areas such as: budgeting, credit, debt, saving, entrepreneurial empowerment, financial management, the stockmarket,social responsibility and insurance. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 670 BUSINESS WORK EXPERIENCE (1-4)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Three to four meetings with instructor and 75 to 300 hours/semester on-the-job. Prerequisite: Employment in a college approved job directly related to the student’s BCM. major.

Students receive on-the-job training in an office environment under the primary supervision of a business employer. Course should be taken within the last two semesters of student’s certificate or AS program completion. For a detailed description of Vocational Cooperative Education, see the Cooperative Education section of this Catalog. For further information about Computer Applications & Office Technology majors, please contact your counselor or the coordinator of the BCM. Program. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 680SE WAREHOUSING AND LOGISTICS Introduce students to warehouse operations and logistics. The theory and mechanics of materials management from purchase to distribution will be covered. Topics include researching, ordering, transporting, warehosing, inventorying, processing and distributing. Transfer: CSU.
BUS. 680SF SOCIAL MEDIA FOR PROFESSIONALS (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Designed to provide students with an understanding of the use of social media in today’s business environment. Topics include the various uses of social media within different departments, the establishment of social media profiles on leading networks, advertising, measurement, the use of 3rd party tools, and ethics. Transfer credit: CSU.

BUS. 880SB OSHA 10 (GENERAL INDUSTRY) (.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Mininum of 8 lecture hours/semester.

he OSHA Outreach Training Program for General Industry provides training for entry level workers and employers on the recognition, avoidance, abatement, and prevention of safety and health hazards in workplaces in general industry. The program also provides information regarding workers' rights, employer responsibilities, and how to file a complaint. Through this training, OSHA helps to ensure that workers are more knowledgeable about workplace hazards and their rights. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

BUS. 880SC SOCIAL MEDIA APPLICATIONS FOR BUSINESS (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester.

An understanding of the use of social media in today’s business environment. Topics include the various uses of social media within different departments; the establishment of social media profiles on leading networks; advertising and measurement.(Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

BUS. 880SD EFFECTIVE MARKETING TECHNIQUES FOR THE NEW ECONOMY (.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours/semester.

Overview of marketing trends in the new economy that includes: social media, branding yourself, understanding SWOT, USPs, Mission/Vision and learn how storytelling through your bio and blogging can lead to building a brand. Students will practice presentations skills. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

BUS. 880SE GETTING STARTED IN BUSINESS (.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours/semester.

Designed to assist in starting a new business or growing a current business. Topics include: broad business environments and structures, regulations and tax implications, entrepreneurial opportunities, business financing and business ethics. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

BUS. 880SF DEVELOPING A BUSINESS PLAN (.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours/semester.

Learn how to develop a well written business plan. Designed to assist students with the design, development and creation of this important tool. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

BUS. 880SG DEVELOPING TOOLS TO CREATE A MARKETING PLAN (.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours/semester.

Learn about marketing and advertising tools, including the Internet, and get ready to start your own business. Topics include identifying your target customers and positioning your company for success. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

CAOT 100 BEGINNING COMPUTER KEYBOARDING (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement.

An introductory typing course for students who want to learn how to type and develop skill using the computer keyboard. Emphasis is on developing correct techniques and basic keyboarding skills. No typing applications or formatting will be taught. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 101 COMPUTER KEYBOARDING SKILL BUILDING (1.5-3)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A minimum of 24 to 48 lecture hours plus 16 to 32 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT 100 or equivalent; ability to type without looking at the keyboard.

This course is designed to improve a student's ability to type rapidly and accurately for sustained periods of time without looking at the keyboard. Students may also use the course to improve typing speed and accuracy. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 6 units. (Open entry.) Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 104 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS WITH WINDOWS I (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 8 lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

Through hands-on experience, students will be introduced to the PC-compatible computers, the Windows operating system, word processing, spreadsheets, and other business-oriented applications. In a lecture/demonstration format, students will gain a basic knowledge of hardware-software interaction. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 105 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS WITH WINDOWS II (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 8 lab hours. Prerequisite: CAOT 104 or equivalent experience.

Students will acquire skills to become independent computer users. Information will be provided on configuring and purchasing Windows computers. Topics covered include operating systems, hardware, and some DOS. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 201 INTEGRATION OF MS OFFICE APPLICATIONS (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 10 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT 200 or equivalent.

Students learn to integrate the four Microsoft Office applications (Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint) by inserting documents, linking information, and embedding objects using exercises and case studies. Microsoft Office's Internet features are also covered, and students will learn how to convert documtnets to HTML and create Web presentations. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 214 WORD PROCESSING I: WORD (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) A minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: Knowledge of the computer keyboard or completion of a typing class. Using a hands-on approach, students will use a computer and word processing software to learn the theories and practical applications of the current version of Word to create, edit, format, manage and enhance documents using customized features. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.
CAOT 215 WORD PROCESSING II: WORD (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 32 lecture hours plus 32 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT 212 or 214.

Using a hands-on approach, students will expand their word processing knowledge and skills by learning theories and practical applications of the current version of Word to focus on advanced applications such as multi-page documents, merges, tables, graphics, macros and styles. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 217 WORD PROCESSING III (1-3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement per unit. Prerequisite: CAOT 213 or 215 or equivalent.

Using a hands-on approach, students become proficient with the advanced features of word processing. In-depth coverage of tables, outlines, merges, style sheets and templates, macros, desktop publishing features, Web documents, online forms, and applications integration. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 221 DESKTOP PUBLISHING: MICROSOFT PUBLISHER (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CAOT 214 or CAOT 200, or equivalent.

Using Microsoft Publisher, students will learn to create professional-looking brochures, newsletters, flyers, certificates, menus, business cards, stationery, and more. The course will include guidelines for combining text and art work effectively to create eye-catching documents for personal and business use. Pre-designed Publisher templates will also be used. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 222 BUSINESS PRESENTATIONS I: POWERPOINT (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 8 lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: CAOT 104 or equivalent.

Students will learn to identify elements that make a business presentation effective and will use the Microsoft PowerPoint program to create their own dynamic business presentations. Course incorporates animation, sound and video clips, clip art, and smart art. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 223 BUSINESS PRESENTATIONS II: POWERPOINT (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 8 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT 222.

Students will cover advanced presentation concepts to enhance proficiency in embedding visuals and sound clips; edit templates and modify color schemes to create PowerPoint presentations that will be converted to an HTML format and uploaded to a Web page. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 225 SPREADSHEETS I: EXCEL (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 8 lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: CAOT 104 or equivalent.

An introduction to Microsoft Excel software, which is used to build, format and print spreadsheets. Topics include the design and creation of professional-looking spreadsheets for personal use or in today's workplace. Students develop worksheets with formulas and built-in functions and present data in graphic form with charts. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 226 SPREADSHEETS II: EXCEL (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 32 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: CAOT 225 or equivalent.

Students advance their knowledge of spreadsheets using Microsoft Excel by learning how to design, enhance, link and consolidate worksheets, as well as apply statistical and financial functions. Additional topics include database management, working with templates, integration, and macros. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 230 DATABASE APPLICATIONS I: ACCESS(1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: CAOT 104 and eligibility for ENGL 836, or equivalent.

Learn to use Windows database management software package, Microsoft Access, on a PC with a hands-on introduction to database administrative tasks: data input, storage, retrieval, editing and reporting. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 231 DATABASE APPLICATIONS II: ACCESS (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 32 lecture hours plus 32 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT 230 or equivalent.

An advanced database course for the student who wants to become professionally competent in database management software to perform advanced administrative tasks using Microsoft Access for business and personal data-handling tasks; emphasis on relational and multiple database design, advanced storage, retrieval, queries, reporting, SQL, and Visual Basic for Access. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 301 MAXIMIZING YOUR EMPLOYMENT POTENTIAL (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 8 lab hours by arrangement.

This course assists students in compiling a professional portfolio (resumes, application letters, work samples, etc.), which can be used to obtain employment and qualify for promotions; Additional job-seeking strategies will be covered, including Internet use to explore employment resources, professional networking, interviewing techniques, and goal setting. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 400 INTERNET I (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours. Prerequisite: CAOT 104 or equivalent.

An introduction to the Internet, including efficient searching techniques, email features, file compression, file transfer protocol (FTP) software, discussion groups, and virus scanning programs. Course is designed for Internet beginners and those students preparing to take an online course. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 403 HTML & WEB AUTHORING APPLICATIONS I (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, either CAOT 104, CAOT 212 or CAOT 214, or equivalent.

An introductory course using web authoring software and a hands-on approach to designing web pages that will consist of: text in various sizes and colors, hyperlinks, mailtos, lists, background color/patterns, interlaced/transparent graphics, tables, and frames with the current version of HTML. Principles of color, line, and design for screen presentations will be included. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 404 HTML & WEB AUTHORING APPLICATIONS II (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT 403 or equivalent.

An intermediate hands-on course to increase proficiency with web authoring software while using the most current version of HTML. Consideration of the most recent specifications for use of text, graphics, tables, frames, layout, positioning, media and interaction. Introduction to advanced features of HTML. Attention to website design, development, maintenance, dynamic and universal interface. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 408 DIGITAL AUDIO AND VIDEO (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 32 lecture hours plus 24 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT 104 or equivalent. Recommended: CAOT 400 or equivalent.

Students learn how to create and prepare digital audio and video for web page inclusion using the most current software, including Adobe Audition audio editor and Premiere video editor. Areas of focus include digital media concepts, capture and conversion techniques from analog to digital and digital to digital, editing tool skills and effects, video web and DVD media publication formats, including QuickTime, Windows Media and RealMedia. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 410 PHOTOSHOP ESSENTIALS (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 12 lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: CAOT 104 or equivalent.

Use Photoshop to digitally convert, edit and print your own photographs and graphics. See how easy it is to manage, clean up old photos, and create exciting new images using this powerful graphics program. Learn what it takes to prepare graphics for the web, print, and current digital media formats. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 412 FLASH I (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT 403 or equivalent.

In this course students will learn to create and publish Flash animation for the web. Areas of focus include the Flash interface, drawing tools, grouping, creating graphic symbols, keyframes, frame-by-frame animation, layers, tweening, and buttons. By the completion of the course students will publish a basic Flash movie that includes ActionScript buttons. Also listed as COMP 412. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 413 FLASH II (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT 412 or equivalent.

In this course students will go beyond the basics and learn more advanced features of Flash. Features covered include masking, movie clips, multiple timelines, sound control, pull down menus, preloaders, and ActionScript. At the completion of the course students will create a complex Flash movie for the web. Also listed as COMP 413. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 414 FLASH ACTIONSCRIPT I (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 12 lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: CAOT 413 or equivalent.

An introduction to ActionScript, the proprietary programming language for the Flash authoring environment. Students will be exposed to the basics of computer programming by controlling and creating Flash objects to create more interactive and usable presentations. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 416 ADOBE INDESIGN ESSENTIALS (1.5 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 or 48 lecture hours plus 8 or 16 lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: CAOT 104 and CAOT 214, or equivalent.

Learn Adobe InDesign, the new industry standard for page layout and design. Create professional looking newsletters, advertisements, brochures, flyers, and other documents. The fundamental principles of layout, typography, styles, exporting documents, and creating transparencies will be explored. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 420 JAVASCRIPT (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT 404 or equivalent.

In-depth examination of the most commonly used web scripting languages and scripting protocols. Scripting elements, procedures and techniques will be studied and applied with the abilities of the non-programmer in mind. Refer to class schedule for specific languages and protocols covered. Also listed as COMP 423. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 434 WEB PROGRAMMING I (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 12 lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: CAOT 404 or equivalent.

Learn to create dynamic web content with one of the popular web programming languages. Students will be introduced to the principles of programming to control web content and data to users. Students will be able to control content on the fly and deliver unique information to web consumers. Students select a language track at the beginning of the course. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 480 NETWORK FUNDAMENTALS (LAN) (3)

Three class hours plus one hour by arrangement per week. Cisco Academy Course ' CCNA 1

An introductory course in networking specific to local area networks (LAN). Topics will include LAN hardware, software, topology, transmission medium, wide area network connectivity, diagnostic tools, system administration, and vendor specific LAN products. Class is complemented with hands-on experience in constructing a local area network. Course is patterned after Cisco training guidelines. Also listed as TCOM 480. Transfer credit: CSU.

CAOT 490 TECHNICAL OVERVIEW OF THE INTERNET (3)

Three class hours and one hour by arrangement per week.

A technical overview of the Internet. This course is intended for students who want to learn about the Internet system architecture, language and vocabulary. Some lectures will be demonstrated on the Internet. Homework assignments may require the student having access on the Internet. Also listed as TCOM 490. Transfer credit: CSU.

CHEM 112 CHEMISTRY IN ACTION (4)

Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week.

An introduction to chemistry and laboratory investigation for non-science majors. The course will focus on chemicals and reactions common in everyday life, medicine, industry, and in the body. Concepts relating to the nature and interactions of atoms, ions and molecules will be presented. Students will learn how to use scientific methods to investigate questions about how chemical systems work. Students will also learn how to use and evaluate information presented on product labels, in advertisement, and available through the Internet. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

CHEM 114 SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS (4)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

A conceptual survey of physical science (physics and chemistry) intended for non-science majors at the General Education level. A general discussion of the scientific method and techniques will be followed by physics, chemistry, and integrated topics. The laboratory portion will cover a hands-on exploration of phenomena discussed in lecture. The physics component of the course will discuss motion, force, energy, electricity and magnetism, waves and light. The chemistry component of the course will focus on chemicals and reactions common in everyday life. Concepts relating to the nature and interactions of atoms, ions, and molecules will be presented. Students will also learn to use and evaluate information presented on product labels, in advertisement, and available through the internet. Also listed as PHYS 114. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

CHEM 192 INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY (4)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 110 or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

An introductory course in Chemistry designed to prepare students for General Chemistry I (CHEM 210). Provides an introduction to fundamental concepts in chemistry with an emphasis on the application of mathematical problem-solving methods to chemistry. Lecture topics will include the basic structure of atoms, the combination of elements in chemical compounds, the metric system and measurement, significant figures, using dimensional analysis and algebra to solve chemical problems, describing chemical reactions using balanced equations, and stoichiometry. In the laboratory, the student will be introduced to the use of common laboratory equipment and techniques. Transfer credit: UC; CSU. (CAN CHEM 6).

CHEM 210 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (5)

Three lecture hours and six laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 120 or MATH 123 with a grade of C or better, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent. Recommended: Completion of CHEM 192 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.

The first semester of a two-semester sequence with laboratory intended for science, engineering and pre-professional majors. Includes a detailed study of atomic and molecular structures, stoichiometric calculations, solutions, thermochemistry, gas laws, physical states, atomic electron orbital theory, and chemical bonding. The course also includes laboratory study of these concepts, experimental chemistry techniques, and the analysis and interpretation of experimental findings.Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3). (CAN CHEM 2; CHEM 210 + 220 = CAN CHEM SEQ A).

CHEM 220 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (5)

Three lecture hours and six laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of CHEM 210, or equivalent.

The second semester of a two-semester sequence with laboratory intended for science, engineering and pre-professional majors. Includes a study of acid-base chemistry, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The course also includes laboratory study of these concepts, experimental chemistry techniques, and the analysis and interpretation of experimental findings. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3). (CAN CHEM 4; CHEM 210 + 220 = CAN CHEM SEQ A).

CHEM 234 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 220 with grade of 'C'' or better. To be taken concurrently with CHEM 237, Organic Chemistry I Laboratory.

Nomenclature, structure, reactions and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds, with emphasis on alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and alkyl halides. Structural isomerism and stereo isomerism. Infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is an integral part of the course with emphasis on structural analysis. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1).

CHEM 235 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 234 and 237 with grades of 'C'' or better. To be taken concurrently with CHEM 238, Organic Chemistry II Laboratory.

Nomenclature, structure, reactions and reaction mechanisms of aromatic compounds, alcohols, ethers, carbonyl and acyl groups, amines, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and proteins. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1).

CHEM 237 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LAB I (2)

Six laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 234; the two classes may be taken concurrently.

Laboratory designed to accompany CHEM 234. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B3).

CHEM 238 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LAB II (2)

Six laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 235; the two classes may be taken concurrently.

Laboratory designed to accompany CHEM 235. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B3).

CHEM 410 CHEMISTRY FOR HEALTH SCIENCES (4)

Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of MATH 110, or appropriate placement test scores and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836, or equivalent.

Survey of the principles of general, organic and biochemistry. The physical and chemical properties of inorganic, organic and biomolecules will be studied. The course will include a study of equilibrium in chemical systems with special emphasis on chemical processes in the body. The laboratory component of the course introduces qualitative and quantitative techniques of chemical study and manipulations with inorganic, organic and biochemical reactions. Designed for Health Science majors (e.g., respiratory therapy, nursing). Not intended for students majoring in biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, or pre-professional programs such as medicine, dentistry or pharmacy. Transfer credit: CSU (B1, B3).

CHIN 111 ELEMENTARY CHINESE I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement.

The first course of a basic two-course sequence covering the same material as a university-level first semester Mandarin Chinese course. Students will acquire the ability to understand, speak, read and write elementary Mandarin Chinese and will learn about the customs, culture and history of the Chinese world. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

CHIN 112 ELEMENTARY CHINESE II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: CHIN 111 or equivalent.

The second course of a basic two-course sequence covering the same material as a university-level first semester Mandarin Chinese course. Students will further their ability to understand, speak, read and write elementary Mandarin Chinese and their knowledge of the customs, culture and history of the Chinese world. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

CHIN 115 BUSINESS CHINESE (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement.

A business Chinese language course emphasizing business situations, business vocabulary, sentence structure, business terminology, protocol, and cultural information. This course will assist students to develop oral expression and business communication skills and to understand Chinese culture for successful business ventures. Transfer credit: CSU.

CHIN 121 ADVANCED ELEMENTARY CHINESE I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: CHIN 112 or equivalent.

This course will continue to develop students' communicative competence through the study of grammar, acquisition of new vocabulary, and practice of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Content-appropriate social and cultural information will be presented to promote the students' understanding of the Mandarin Chinese-speaking world. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

CHIN 122 ADVANCED ELEMENTARY CHINESE II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: CHIN 121 or equivalent.

This course will continue to develop students' communicative competence through the study of grammar, acquisition of new vocabulary, and practice of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Content-appropriate social and cultural information will be presented to promote the students' understanding of the Mandarin Chinese-speaking world. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

CHIN 130 INTERMEDIATE CHINESE (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CHIN 122 or equivalent.

The material covered in this course includes structures to practice conversation and composition, to acquire new vocabulary, to review and reinforce grammar, and to initiate discussions about Chinese history, literature and culture. Formal written-style expressions, which are used in news broadcasts and formal speeches, will be introduced. Transfer credit: CSU (C2).

In Fall 2014, used for BECALOS students from Mexico.
COMB 301, 302 WRESTLING, BEGINNING AND INTERMEDIATE (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangementsemester. Recommended: Intermediate – COMB 301 or equivalent.

Beginning – Instruction in rules and scoring systems. Instruction in take-downs, escapes, reversals, break-downs, rides, and pinning combinations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

Intermediate – Competition in dual competition and a class tournament. (May be taken four times for a maximum of four units.) Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 301, 302 WRESTLING, BEGINNING AND INTERMEDIATE (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangementsemester. Recommended: Intermediate – COMB 301 or equivalent.

Beginning – Instruction in rules and scoring systems. Instruction in take-downs, escapes, reversals, break-downs, rides, and pinning combinations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

Intermediate – Competition in dual competition and a class tournament. (May be taken four times for a maximum of four units.) Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 301, 302 WRESTLING, BEGINNING AND INTERMEDIATE (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangementsemester. Recommended: Intermediate – COMB 301 or equivalent.

Beginning – Instruction in rules and scoring systems. Instruction in take-downs, escapes, reversals, break-downs, rides, and pinning combinations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

Intermediate – Competition in dual competition and a class tournament. (May be taken four times for a maximum of four units.) Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 301, 302 WRESTLING, BEGINNING AND INTERMEDIATE (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangementsemester. Recommended: Intermediate – COMB 301 or equivalent.

Beginning – Instruction in rules and scoring systems. Instruction in take-downs, escapes, reversals, break-downs, rides, and pinning combinations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

Intermediate – Competition in dual competition and a class tournament. (May be taken four times for a maximum of four units.) Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 401 (C) SELF DEFENSE (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

One and one half or three class hours per week.

A course designed to gain knowledge about basic self defense. Areas covered will be mental preparation, avoidance of situations conducive to assault, punching, kicking, pressure points and defenses. Both non-violent and violent defenses will be dealt with. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).
COMB 401 (C) SELF DEFENSE (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

One and one half or three class hours per week.

A course designed to gain knowledge about basic self defense. Areas covered will be mental preparation, avoidance of situations conducive to assault, punching, kicking, pressure points and defenses. Both non-violent and violent defenses will be dealt with. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 401.1 SELF DEFENSE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

A beginning level course designed to teach the principles and skills of self-defense. Areas covered will be mental preparation, avoidance of situations conducive to assault, punching, kicking, pressure points and defenses. This course includes instruction in both non-violent and violent defenses. Transfer: UC; CSU.

COMB 401.1 SELF DEFENSE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

A beginning level course designed to teach the principles and skills of self-defense. Areas covered will be mental preparation, avoidance of situations conducive to assault, punching, kicking, pressure points and defenses. This course includes instruction in both non-violent and violent defenses. Transfer: UC; CSU.

COMB 401.2 SELF DEFENSE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An intermediate level course designed to teach the principles and skills of self-defense. Areas covered will be mental preparation, avoidance of situations conducive to assault, punching, kicking, pressure points and defenses. This course includes instruction in both non-violent and violent defenses. Transfer: UC; CSU.

COMB 401.2 SELF DEFENSE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An intermediate level course designed to teach the principles and skills of self-defense. Areas covered will be mental preparation, avoidance of situations conducive to assault, punching, kicking, pressure points and defenses. This course includes instruction in both non-violent and violent defenses. Transfer: UC; CSU.

COMB 401.3 SELF DEFENSE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level course designed to teach the principles and skills of self-defense. Areas covered will be mental preparation, avoidance of situations conducive to assault, punching, kicking, pressure points and defenses. This course includes instruction in both non-violent and violent defenses. Transfer: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 401.3 SELF DEFENSE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level course designed to teach the principles and skills of self-defense. Areas covered will be mental preparation, avoidance of situations conducive to assault, punching, kicking, pressure points and defenses. This course includes instruction in both non-violent and violent defenses. Transfer: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 401.4 SELF DEFENSE IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced level course designed to teach the principles and skills of self-defense. Areas covered will be mental preparation, avoidance of situations conducive to assault, punching, kicking, pressure points and defenses. This course includes instruction in both non-violent and violent defenses. Transfer: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 401.4 SELF DEFENSE IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced level course designed to teach the principles and skills of self-defense. Areas covered will be mental preparation, avoidance of situations conducive to assault, punching, kicking, pressure points and defenses. This course includes instruction in both non-violent and violent defenses. Transfer: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 404 (C) BEGINNING SHOTOKAN KARATE (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

One and one half or three class hours and one hour by arrangement per week.

This course will introduce the student to the skills and techniques of the Japanese art of Shotokan Karate. Emphasis will be placed on physical conditioning, basic strikes and blocks, forms (kata), sparring techniques, self-discipline and self-development. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 404 (C) BEGINNING SHOTOKAN KARATE (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

One and one half or three class hours and one hour by arrangement per week.

This course will introduce the student to the skills and techniques of the Japanese art of Shotokan Karate. Emphasis will be placed on physical conditioning, basic strikes and blocks, forms (kata), sparring techniques, self-discipline and self-development. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 404.1 SHOTOKAN KARATE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This course will introduce the student at a beginning level to the skills and techniques of the Japanese art of Shotokan Karate. Emphasis will be placed on physical conditioning, basic strikes and blocks, forms (kata), sparring techniques, self-discipline and self-development. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 404.1 SHOTOKAN KARATE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This course will introduce the student at a beginning level to the skills and techniques of the Japanese art of Shotokan Karate. Emphasis will be placed on physical conditioning, basic strikes and blocks, forms (kata), sparring techniques, self-discipline and self-development. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 404.2 SHOTOKAN KARATE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This course will introduce the student at an intermediate level to the skills and techniques of the Japanese art of Shotokan Karate. Emphasis will be placed on physical conditioning, basic strikes and blocks, forms (kata), sparring techniques, self-discipline and self-development. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 404.2 SHOTOKAN KARATE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This course will introduce the student at an intermediate level to the skills and techniques of the Japanese art of Shotokan Karate. Emphasis will be placed on physical conditioning, basic strikes and blocks, forms (kata), sparring techniques, self-discipline and self-development. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 404.3 SHOTOKAN KARATE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level course designed to teach the principles and skills of self-defense. Areas covered will be mental preparation, avoidance of situations conducive to assault, punching, kicking, pressure points and defenses. This course includes instruction in both non-violent and violent defenses. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 404.3 SHOTOKAN KARATE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level course designed to teach the principles and skills of self-defense. Areas covered will be mental preparation, avoidance of situations conducive to assault, punching, kicking, pressure points and defenses. This course includes instruction in both non-violent and violent defenses. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 404.4 SHOTOKAN KARATE IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This course will introduce the student at an advanced level to the skills and techniques of the Japanese art of Shotokan Karate. Emphasis will be placed on physical conditioning, basic strikes and blocks, forms (kata), sparring techniques, self-discipline and self-development. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMB 404.4 SHOTOKAN KARATE IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This course will introduce the student at an advanced level to the skills and techniques of the Japanese art of Shotokan Karate. Emphasis will be placed on physical conditioning, basic strikes and blocks, forms (kata), sparring techniques, self-discipline and self-development. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

COMM 100 PUBLIC SPEAKING (3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 or ESOL 400, or equivalent. Study and practice in the basic principles of effective public oral communication. Students will research, prepare and extemporaneously deliver various speeches. Analysis and evaluation of oral, public communication is also included. Relevant social issues may be examined. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (A1).
COMM 110 PUBLIC SPEAKING (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours and one hour by arrangement per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

Study and practice in the basic principles of effective public oral communication. Students will research, prepare and extemporaneously deliver various speeches. Analysis and evaluation of oral, public communication is also included. Relevant social issues may be examined. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (A1).

COMM 127 ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE (3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 or ENGL 846, or equivalent. Lecture-laboratory course in the principles and techniques of argumentation and debate. Research in significant social problems. Analysis of propositions, issues, evidence and reasoning. Training and experience in the forms of debate. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (A1).
COMM 130 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Study and practice of interpersonal relationships. Analysis of the verbal and non-verbal modes of communication. Investigation of communication conflicts in interpersonal relationships and methods of conflict resolution. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (A1).

COMM 140 SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION (3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or 105, or equivalent. Understanding of the principles of group interaction and decision making, including study of leadership, types of authority, teamwork and conflict resolution. Participation in discussion groups to share information, solve problems and reach consensus. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (A1).
COMM 150 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION (3) Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 836 or ESOL 400. Designed for students from all cultural backgrounds. Study of basic theory and skills of intercultural communication using round table discussion, public speaking and critical analysis. Emphasis is given to empathy building for communicating effectively in a diverse social and professional environment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (A1).
695INDEPENDENT STUDY (.5-3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 lab hours by arrangement for each .5 unit. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Designed for students who are interested in furthering their knowledge via self-paced, individualized instruction provided in selected areas or directed study to be arranged with instructor and approved by the division dean using the Independent Study Form. Varying modes of instruction can be used -- laboratory, research, skill development, etc. For each unit earned, students are required to devote three hours per week throughout the semester. Students may take only one Independent Study course within a given discipline. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMM 813 SPEECH FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS (3) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Designed to develop fluency in basic presentational skills in spoken English. Practice speaking with others and conversing in varying communication experiences. Recommended for ESOL 830 or ESOL 831/832 level students. May be repeated twice for credit. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)
COMP 118 INTRODUCTION TO OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAM DESIGN (4)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week. Recommended: Completion of MATH 110 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 836 or equivalent.

Introduction to computing systems concepts necessary for program coding, compilation and execution; problem-solving techniques; object-oriented analysis and design; program coding, testing and documentation. Students will use the Java language to explore algorithm development, data types, flow of control, classes, objects, methods, vectors, and event-driven programming. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

COMP 155 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING VISUAL BASIC (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours and one and one-half lab hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 110 or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

An introduction to computer programming using the high level language VISUAL BASIC. Emphasis is on structured programming techniques and general problem solving skills in both numerical and non-numerical applications. Students will be able to formulate, represent, and solve problems using the computer. Students will run programs on IBM PC's using the college's microcomputer laboratory. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

COMP 156 INTERMEDIATE PROGRAMMING IN VISUAL BASIC (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours and one and one-half lab hours per week. Prerequisite: COMP 155 or equivalent.

An intermediate course in computer programming using the high level language VISUAL BASIC. Emphasis is on user friendly interfaces, structural programming techniques, and general problem solving skills in both numerical and non-numerical applications. Students will be able to formulate, represent and solve problems using the computer. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

COMP 190 INTRODUCTION TO C PROGRAMMING (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours and one and one-half lab hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 110 or equivalent. Recommended: MATH 120 or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 836.

This course provides an introduction to computer science using the C programming language. Students will gain an understanding of the fundamentals of the C language and will examine and use basic algorithms for problem solving. Programming design and problem solving on a computer will be implemented through use of the C language. This course is recommended for students who plan to transfer and major in computer science and those interested in learning the C programming language. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

COMP 250 INTRODUCTION TO OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING: C++ (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 120, or MATH 122 and MATH 123, or equivalent; and some previous programming experience or coursework.

Introduction to programming and software engineering for computer science and engineering majors and computer professionals. A systematic approach to the design, implementation, and management of robust C++ computer programs. Course emphasizes Object-Oriented programming design, programming documentation, testing and debugging techniques. This course conforms to the ACM CS1 standards. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

COMP 252 PROGRAMMING METHODS II: C++ (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours and three lab hours by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: COMP 250 with a grade of C or Credit or better, or one full year of C professional programming experience, or equivalent.

Continuation of Programming Methods I: C++ for Computer Science majors and computer professionals. Topics include advanced class design (inheritance and polymorphism), data abstraction, templates, container classes, pointers and dynamic memory allocation, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, recursion, graphs, and sorting/searching algorithms. Emphasizes object-oriented features of C++. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

COMP 284 PROGRAMMING METHODS I: JAVA (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours and three lab hours by arrangement per week. Prerequisites: COMP 118 and MATH 120 with a grade of C or Credit or better, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 or equivalent.

Introduction to computer science and web-based programming using the object-oriented Java language for Computer Science majors and computer professionals. Includes Java language fundamentals, classes, control structures, methods, libraries/API packages, recursion, arrays, strings, vectors, searching, sorting, and exception handling. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

COMP 286 PROGRAMMING METHODS II: JAVA (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours and three lab hours by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: COMP 284 with a grade of C or Credit or better, or equivalent.

Advanced data structures and programming techniques for Computer Science majors and computer professionals. Object-oriented approach to a variety of data structures, including vectors, stacks, queues, linked lists, trees, bags, sets, and graphs. Includes recursion, sorting and searching topics, such as Big O notation and hash tables. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

COMP 312 INSTALLING/USING LINUX AS YOUR PC OS (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A total of 24 lecture hours plus eight lab hours by arrangement.

A first course on installing and using Linux as the operating system running on an Intel-compatible PC or workstation computer. Topics include creating installation media, installing Linux, Linux file system concepts, using the graphical desktop interface, beginning shell (command line) usage, updating the system, and configuring access to common network services. After successful completion of this course, students will be confident installing and using common Linux distributions (e.g., Red Hat, Fedora, SUSE, Ubuntu) on a home or work PC. Also listed as TCOM 312. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 313 WORKING IN A LINUX SHELL ENVIRONMENT (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A total of 24 lecture hours plus eight lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of COMP/TCOM 312, or equivalent experience using a Linux desktop system.

A course on using the Linux shell (command line) environment. Topics include comparing the Linux graphical desktop environment and the shell environment, shell commands for file system usage, shell features for productivity and customization (history, completion, aliases, environment files), advanced shell features (regular expressions, redirection, pipelines), introduction to shell scripts and shell commands for process management and remote system access. After successful completion of this course, students will be confident using the bash-shell environment found on common Linux distributions (e.g., Red Hat, Fedora, SUSE, Ubuntu). Also listed as TCOM 313. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 314 MANAGING A LINUX SYSTEM (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A total of 24 lecture hours plus eight lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of COMP/TCOM 312, or equivalent experience installing or using a Linux system, or equivalent.

An intermediate course on administering a Linux system. Designed for individuals who have installed Linux but who now want a hands-on exposure to key concepts, issues and capabilities for managing a Linux system. Topics include installing from alternate media sources (network installs), managing disk devices (defining partitions, creating file systems, and mounting/un-mounting file systems), creating multi-boot systems and boot loader menus, using run levels including trouble-shooting with single user mode, and maintaining system software including installing from source code and recompiling kernels. The focus of this course is on developing expertise for managing a given Linux system (as opposed to managing services provided to other systems). After successful completion of this course, students will be confident in managing a system with a common Linux distribution (e.g., Red Hat, Fedora, SUSE, Ubuntu). Also listed as TCOM 314. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 315 MANAGING LINUX-BASED INTERNET SERVICES (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: COMP/TCOM 314 or equivalent experience installing and managing a Linux system, and TCOM 480 or equivalent experience using local area networks, or equivalent. Recommended: COMP/TCOM 313 or equivalent experience using the Linux bash-shell.

An intermediate course on managing Linux-based Internet services. Designed for individuals who have experience installing and managing Linux systems, but now want a hands-on exposure to the concepts, issues and capabilities for providing public Internet services based on Linux servers. Topics include selecting server functionality during a Linux installation, configuring name services (DNS) for a custom domain name, hosting Web pages and configuring management of Web pages, providing secure Web page connections, providing remote access, providing email services, connecting to databases for dynamic Web page hosting, and installing from packages vs. source code. This course focuses on administering Linux-based Internet servers that provide common services found on the public Internet. After successful completion of this course, students will be confident in providing Internet services using a common Linux distribution (e.g., Red Hat, Fedora, SUSE, Ubuntu). Also listed as TCOM 315. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 316 MANAGING LINUX-BASED INTRA-NET (ENTERPRISE) SERVICES (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: COMP/TCOM 314 or equivalent experience installing and managing a Linux system, and TCOM 480 or equivalent experience managing a local area network, or equivalent. Recommended: COMP/TCOM 313 or equivalent experience using the Linux bash-shell.

An intermediate course on managing Linux-based servers in a large company (intra-net or enterprise) environment. Designed for individuals who have experience installing and managing Linux systems, but now want a hands-on exposure to the concepts, issues and capabilities for providing network services typically found inside a company intra-net. Topics include selecting server functionality during a Linux installation, configuring private name services (DNS), configuring dynamic IP addressing (DHCP), providing file shares with traditional Unix NFS services or cross-platform (Windows) Samba services, managing centralized log-in resources with NIS or LDAP, controlling Internet access through proxy servers, providing security with private certificate authorities, RADIUS servers and secure tunnels, and tools to help manage deployment of client systems (PXE, diskless, private repositories). This course focuses on administering Linux-based network resources found within a company or enterprise network. After successful completion of this course, students will be confident in providing intra-net services using a common Linux distribution (e.g., Red Hat, Fedora, SUSE, Ubuntu). Also listed as TCOM 316. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 355 INTRODUCTION TO ORACLE ' SQL (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week and three lab hours per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 110 with a grade of C or Credit or better, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or equivalent.

An extensive introduction to data server technology. The course covers the concepts of both relational and object relational databases and the powerful SQL programming language. Students learn to create and maintain database objects and to store, retrieve and manipulate data. Students will learn to write SQL and SQL*Plus script files using the iSQL*Plus tool to generate report-like output. Demonstrations and hands-on practice reinforce the fundamental concepts. This course is the first level of certification for the Oracle Certified Professional track. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 356 FUNDAMENTALS OF DATABASE ADMINISTRATION I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week and three lab hours per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: COMP 355 with a grade of C or Credit or better, or equivalent.

Utilizing SQL, this course is designed to give students a firm foundation in basic database tasks. Students will learn to design, create and maintain the latest Oracle database. Successful completion of COMP 355 and COMP 356 constitutes an Oracle Certified Associate program. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 357 FUNDAMENTALS OF DATABASE ADMINISTRATION II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week and three lab hours per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: COMP 356 with a grade of C or Credit or better, or equivalent.

Advanced concepts to maintain an Oracle database, including planning and implementing backup and recovery strategies, trends and problems associated with business networking, and the architecture of the Oracle client/server network. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 378 PROGRAMMING IN PERL (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week and three lab hours per week by arrangement. Recommended: Completion of COMP 118, COMP 250 or COMP 284 with a grade of C or Credit or better, or equivalent.

Programming in the Windows and UNIX environment using PERL to create utility programs. Included is the design, creation, debugging and execution of programs written in the PERL programming language. Transfer: CSU.

COMP 412 FLASH I (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT 403 or equivalent.

In this course students will learn to create and publish Flash animation for the web. Areas of focus include the Flash interface, drawing tools, grouping, creating graphic symbols, keyframes, frame-by-frame animation, layers, tweening, and buttons. By the completion of the course students will publish a basic Flash movie that includes ActionScript buttons. Also listed as CAOT 412. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 413 FLASH II (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT/COMP 412 or equivalent.

In this course students will go beyond the basics and learn the advanced features of Flash. Features covered include masking, movie clips, multiple time lines, sound control, pull-down menus, preloaders, and ActionScript. At the completion of the course students will create a complex Flash movie for the web. Also listed as CAOT 413. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 423 JAVASCRIPT (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: CAOT 404 or equivalent.

In-depth examination of the most commonly used web scripting languages and scripting protocols. Scripting elements, procedures and techniques will be studied and applied with the abilities of the non-programmer in mind. Refer to class schedule for specific languages and protocols covered. Also listed as CAOT 420. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 451 PC CONFIGURATION AND REPAIR (6)

Five lecture hours and three lab hours per week plus one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of CAOT 105 or equivalent, and satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of or concurrent enrollment in ELEC 110 or TCOM 405, or equivalent training or experience.

This course provides preparation for A+ certification. A hands-on technical course designed to provide an in-depth understanding of PC hardware and software from an installation and repair outlook. Materials covered will include beginning and advanced software, hardware components and configuration, operating systems and how they control the PC. Includes direct hands-on experience with the tools and skills required for entry-level employment. Also listed as TCOM 451. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 481 NETWORK SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION (3)

Three lecture hours per week and one lab hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of TCOM 480, or equivalent training or experience.

An application-based course in Network Administration specific to LAN's. Coverage includes the functions and concepts of a wide area network, Microsoft server, designing LAN user accounts and their network administration. Hands-on experience provided in setting up and troubleshooting servers, workstations, network and peripheral devices. Course is patterned after Microsoft networking guidelines. Also listed as TCOM 481. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 484 ADVANCED ROUTING CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS (3)

Three lecture hours per week and one lab hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of TCOM 482, or equivalent training or experience. Recommended: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of TCOM 483, or equivalent training or experience.

Cisco Academy Course ' CCNA 3 & 4

An advanced course in routing concepts and configurations on large internetworks. Students will configure and manage routers by implementing advanced features and common routing protocols such as EIGRP and OSPF. Includes instructor-directed hands-on activities. This course is patterned after Cisco Router training guidelines. Also listed as TCOM 484. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 486 NETWORK SECURITY (3)

Three lecture hours and one lab hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of TCOM 482, or equivalent training or experience.

This course introduces students to network security using firewall and VPN (virtual private network) technology. Students will be exposed to the theory and application of both firewall and VPN network architecture. Students will have the opportunity for hands-on practice to administer security policy and VPN configuration using Checkpoint software. Also listed as TCOM 486. Transfer credit CSU.COMP 487 ADVANCED NETWORK SECURITY (3)

Three lecture hours per week plus three lab hours by arrangement per week. Recommended: Completion of COMP/TCOM 486, or equivalent training or experience.

An advanced network security course. Topics include: design and administration of content security, virtual private networks, high availability, load balancing, and other advance security topics using industry standard software. Also listed as TCOM 487. Also listed as TCOM 487. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.

COMP 665 SELECTED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (.5-2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of eight lecture hours per one-half unit. Recommended: MATH 120 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 836 or equivalent.

Exploration of selected contemporary topics or themes in Computer Science. Sample topics include new programming languages, operating systems, net-centric computing, problem-solving and program design methodologies, software engineering processes, graphical user interface design, information management, and contemporary issues in Computer Science. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

COOP 670 VOCATIONAL COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (1-4)

(Pass/No Pass.) (VA Institutional Rates.)

Variable work station hours. Prerequisite: Permission of the Cooperative Education Office, concurrent enrollment in a planned vocational program, and employment in a college approved job directly related to the student's academic major.

Students may receive credit for work experience related to their major field or to their established career goal. Seminars and individual conferences are scheduled at convenient times during the semester for the instructor and the student to establish learning objectives related to the student's employment. Students are given appropriate assignments related to the stated objectives and graded in accordance with the college's established grading system. As an alternative, related instruction classes meeting one hour per week, usually in the evening, are available for those students who prefer or need a more structured learning process. One unit of credit for each 75 hours worked per semester, with a maximum of four units per semester, may be earned by students with jobs related to their academic or occupational majors or goals. A maximum of 16 units of college credit may be earned in parallel Cooperative Education. Transfer credit: CSU.

COOP 671 GENERAL COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (1-3)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Variable work station hours.

Designed for the student who does not have a job that relates to a specific occupational goal or college major. Under the direction of the college coordinator, students focus on career awareness and development of desirable employment habits and attitudes. Each student must establish measurable learning objectives appropriate for his/her job. Students may be eligible for up to three units of credit per semester. One unit of credit may be earned for each 75 hours of paid work (approximately five hours per week) or 60 hours of volunteer work per semester. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 6 units. Transfer credit: CSU.

COSM 665 SELECTED TOPICS IN COSMETOLOGY (.5 or 1 or 1.5)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A minimum of 8 lecture hours for each .5 unit.

Short courses designed for Cosmetology, Esthetician and Spa professionals who are interested in increasing or developing new skills, for the lay person who is interested in acquiring knowledge or skills related to self-enhancement, and for those interested in exploring career opportunities in the Cosmetology, Esthetician or Spa fields. Each topic may be repeated for credit a maximum of three times.

COSM 665SK COSMETOLOGY AIDE PREPARATION CLASS I (1)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A minimum of eight lecture hours and 24 lab hours.

This course is designed for licensed Cosmetologists and Estheticians who are interested in an Aide position in the Skyline Cosmetology Department. Topics will include class environment, state board regulations, and procedures of the Skyline Cosmetology Department. Students will be required to complete class observations, work in the lab environment, and apply theory concepts to prepare for lecture and/or lab. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times.

COSM 665SL COSMETOLOGY AIDE PREPARATION CLASS II (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A minimum of 16 lecture hours and 24 lab hours.

This intermediate course is designed for licensed Cosmetologists and Estheticians who are interested in an Aide position in the Skyline Cosmetology Department. This course is a continuation of Cosmetology Aide Preparation Class I with individualized subject matter of all state board requirements, including observation of instructors during lab and floor management of students and clients. Students will complete mentoring and shadowing under the supervision of a licensed instructor. When all requirements are met, students will receive a Cosmetology Department Aide Certificate. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times.

COSM 665Sm COSMETOLOGY COMPETITION PREPARATION (.5)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A minimum of 24 lab hours.

This short course is designed for any registered Cosmetology student who is interested in preparing for competitions in hair, skin and nails. Students will work on speed, accuracy, consistency, and review of competition rules and regulations to be able to compete in state, national and international competitions. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times.

COSM 665SR Esthetician: It's Your Business (Nuts & Bolts) (0.5)

(Pass/No Pass)

Opening your own business, this one day course will focus on what has to be done from start to finish. Tracking your income and expenses, identifying your market, purchasing products, inventory tracking, maintaining good records, client and retail retention.

COSM 665SS Advanced Skin Analysis and Facial Peels (0.5)

(Pass/No Pass)

Prerequisite: COSM 665SS, or Licensed Estehtician/Cosmetologiist or Esthetic student enrolled in a licensing program.

Short course designed to understand the effects and reactions of chemical peels on the skin. Topics include the chemistry of peels and the application of various peels. This course has a non-refundable materials charge of $20.

COSM 665ST BUSINESS ETIQUETTE (0.5)

(Pass/No Pass)

Your professional success is an important part of what your image and behavior conveys.This one day course will cover job interviewing, hosting a business meal, making a phone call, writing a cover letter, and thank you notes. Shows how to make a lasting impression.

COSM 700 COSMETOLOGY CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE I (.5-10)

Five lecture hours and 35 lab hours per week for eight weeks for day students and five lecture hours and 19 lab hours per week for sixteen weeks for evening students.

Basic manipulative skills in hair design, permanent waving, hair coloring, hair cutting, and manicuring/pedicuring. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times.

COSM 710 COSMETOLOGY CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE II: FACIALS (.5-8)

Five lecture hours and 35 lab hours per week for eight weeks. Prerequisite: Completion of COSM 700 with a grade of C or better.

Basic manipulative skills in facials, arching/waxing, and make-up. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times.

COSM 720 COSMETOLOGY CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE III (.5-10)

Five lecture hours and 35 lab hours per week for eight weeks for day students and five lecture hours and 19 lab hours per week for sixteen weeks for evening students. Prerequisite: Completion of COSM 700 with a grade of C or better.

Basic manipulative skills in chemical straightening, hair analysis, hair lightening, conditioners and advanced hair coloring and styling techniques, and advanced permanent waving. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times.

COSM 730 COSMETOLOGY CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE IV (.5-8)

Five lecture hours and 35 lab hours per week for eight weeks. Prerequisite: Completion of COSM 700 with a grade of C or better.

Develop manipulative skills in nail wraps, tips and sculptured nails. Introduce and develop manipulative skills in thermal pressing and curling, fingerwaving and scientific scalp treatments. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times.

COSM 735 COSMETOLOGY CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE V: NEW CONCEPTS (3)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 112 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: Completion of COSM 700 or equivalent.

Designed for continuing cosmetology students working toward a Skyline College Certificate or Associate in Science Degree. The course allows students to work toward California State requirements accruing applied effort ticket requirements in advanced hair cutting techniques, braiding, advanced permanent waving, and evening and day up do styling.

COSM 740 COSMETOLOGY CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE V (.5-10)

Five lecture hours and 35 lab hours per week for eight weeks for day students and five lecture hours and 19 lab hours per week for sixteen weeks for evening students. Prerequisite: Completion of COSM 700, 710, 720, and 730 with a grade of C or better.

California State Board review. Advanced salon preparation. Emphasizes salon environment in relationship to skill and techniques. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times.

COSM 745 COSMETOLOGY CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE VI: SENIOR PRACTICAL (.5-6)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 224 lab hours/semester to earn 6 units. Prerequisite: Completion of COSM 700 or equivalent.

Designed for continuing cosmetology students to complete classes and earn a Skyline College Certificate or Associate in Science Degree. The course allows students to complete California State requirements accruing applied effort ticket requirements focusing on speed, accuracy and styling services for the salon environment.

COSM 750 COSMETOLOGY BRUSH-UP (1-19)

Nine lecture hours and thirty-one lab hours per week. Lab and theory hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: Cosmetology license.

To satisfy supplemental or out-of-state training requirements. Basic and advanced instruction in beauty salon processes with emphasis on performance and efficiency. (Open entry.) May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times.

COSM 754 MANICURING (1-10)

Lecture/Lab total of 400 hours.

The art of caring for the hands and nails. Includes instruction in sculpture nails, application of nail tips and nail art. Four hundred hours training in preparation for licensure by the California State Board of Cosmetology in the field of manicuring. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times.

COSM 760 COSMETOLOGY INSTRUCTOR PREPARATION (1-5)

A minimum of 16 lecture hours and 16 lab hours for each unit; a maximum of 80 lecture hours and 80 lab hours to earn five units. Prerequisite: Valid California Cosmetologist's license and a minimum of one year's full-time practical experience.

Designed for experienced, licensed cosmetologists interested in teaching cosmetology courses in the community college system. The focus is on teaching methodologies and techniques that emphasize theoretical and practical subject matter for Cosmetology students. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 20 units.

COSM 761 COSMETOLOGY INSTRUCTOR PREPARATION II (1-7)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 16 lab hours by arrangement for each unit; a minimum of 112 lecture hours and 112 lab hours to earn 7 units. Prerequisite: Valid California Cosmetology license and a minimum of one year full-time practical experience; and completion of COSM 760.

Designed for experienced, licensed cosmetologists, barbers, estheticians, and manicurists interested in teaching specific cosmetology courses with a focus on teaching methodologies and techniques that emphasize theoretical and practical subject matter using the four-step lesson plan.

COSM 775 ESTHETICIAN (1-8)

Twenty class hours per week (5 lecture, 15 lab.)

Designed to develop skills and knowledge in skin care. Upon successful completion of the 600 hour course the student will be eligible to apply for Esthetician examination at the California State Board of Cosmetology. May be repeated once for credit.

COSM 782 ADVANCED COSMETOLOGY CONCEPTS (2)

(Offered in Evening only.)

Two lecture hours and 3 lab hours per week for one-half semester. Prerequisite: Valid California Cosmetology license or actively enrolled in Skyline Cosmetology program.

Emphasis is placed on advanced methods, techniques and application of hair fashion, design and coordination. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times.

COSM 784 SALON PRACTICE (.5-1.5)

Forty-eight lab hours per unit. Prerequisite: Must be currently enrolled in Cosmetology 710, 720, 730 or 740.

Offers additional salon practice to all students enrolled in the current day program. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times.

COSM 785 SPA TECHNICIAN TRAINING (1-5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Six lecture hours and six lab hours per week.

Thorough study of wellness services available in day and destination spa businesses. Focus is on health, fitness, and stress management. Students will develop skill in spa treatments, product knowledge, customer relations, business operations, and the job search. May be repeated once for credit.

COSM 880SB COSMETOLOGY CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE III (0.5-5.0) Prerequisite: COSM 740 or equivalent. Topics covered include advanced coursework in skin histology and diseases, facials, hair removal, chemistry, electricity, artificial nail applications, styling, relaxing, bleaching highlighting, advanced hair coloring, thermal press and curl anatomy. In addition, there will be a review of the state board exam.
COSM 880SC ADVANCED ESTHETIC TRAINING (8)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 96 lecture hours and 96 lab hours/semester. Completion of an Esthetician or a Cosmetology program.

Provides students with advanced training in esthetics. Students will learn and receive practical hands-on training in the following: advanced skin analysis, facial techniques with the use of facial devices, advanced Hair Removal, and chemical exfoliation techniques such as the application of unbuffered glycolic, AHA'S, BHA'S, Oxygen, and TCA solution. The program offers a pathway for licensed Estheticians and Cosmetologists wishing to increase their current knowledge. Advanced techniques covered in this course are not taught in basic licensure esthetician or cosmetology programs.

COUN 100 COLLEGE SUCCESS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.
An overview of the concepts and significance of factors that contribute to college success. Focus on understanding the college/university systems, goal setting, educational planning, health maintenance, stress management, learning styles, study skills, college resources, relationships, and cultural diversity. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E1).

COUN 102 STUDENT SUCCESS STRATEGIES (.5)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 8 lecture hours/semester.
Designed to help students explore and understand issues that determine their academic success. Students will learn about strategies to help them succeed in college. Transfer credit: CSU.

COUN 104 UNDERSTANDING TRANSFER (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester.
A comprehensive study of the university transfer process as it relates to community college students. Topics include an overview of higher education systems, transfer admissions requirements, college research, transfer resources, the college application process, and transitional issues. Transfer credit: CSU.

COUN 105 UP YOUR SELF-ESTEEM (.5)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 8 lecture hours/semester.
Examination of basic tenets of self-esteem focusing on factors of values, cognition, and life events that shape ones' self-esteem. Transfer credit: CSU.

COUN 106 ANIXETY MANAGEMENT (.5)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 8 lecture hours/semester.
Examination of the physiological, emotional and mental components of anxiety. The long-term effects of anxiety on one’s physical health will be explored. Transfer credit: CSU.

COUN 107 COPING WITH DEPRESSION (.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A total of eight lecture hours.

Medical, biological and social factors contributing to depression are explored. Scope of treatment options from self-help to medication are examined. Transfer credit: CSU.

COUN 108 ANGER MANAGEMENT (.5)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 8 lecture hours/semester.
Examination of anger management techniques designed to develop specific skills in controlling this emotion. The long-term effects of anger on one's physical and emotional health will be explored. Transfer credit: CSU.

COUN 640 MONEY MANAGEMENT FOR ACADEMIC SUCCESS (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester.
An introduction to the basics of personal money management principles as they relate to budgeting, savings, credit establishment, credit improvement and debt reduction. Students will gain tools to implement and practice positive financial behaviors and explore how one?s own personal relationship with finances directly relates to academic and career success. A focus on goal setting strategies will be emphasized and personal academic and financial goals will be explored. Transfer: CSU.

COUN 651 PUENTE SEMINAR (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester.
Designed to assist students in exploring and understanding academic, career, personal, and cross-cultural topics and issues that influence their educational success. Transfer credit: CSU.

COUN 652 HONORS SEMINAR – APPLYING TO COMPETITIVE UNIVERSITIES (.5)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 8 lecture hours/semester.
Preparation for transfer to competitive colleges and universities. Topics will include understanding the transfer process, financial aid and scholarships, completing the UC and Common Application and writing your personal statement. Transfer credit: CSU.

COUN 655.1 HERMANOS SEMINAR - COLLEGE SUCCESS FACTORS (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester.
An overview of the concepts and significance of factors that contribute to success in education. Factors to be explored include social awareness, cultural identity, motivation, leadership, and goals setting. Designed to help students in understanding and dealing with their personal, social, and cross-cultural concerns and on understanding of the relationship of cultural experiences and educational success. Transfer credit: CSU.

COUN 655.2 HERMANOS SEMINAR - TRANSITION TO COLLEGE (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester.
Course explores student's attitudes toward learning and college. Designed to facilitate the transition from high school to college. Focus on understanding the college/university systems, college resources, and developing key student skills such as time management, self-esteem, and goal setting. Transfer credit: CSU.

COUN 656.1 HERMANAS SEMINAR - COLLEGE SUCCESS FACTORS (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester.
This course is designed to help students in understanding and dealing with their personal, social, professional, and cross-cultural concerns in relation to personal development. Additionally, this course will focus on the lives and experiences of Latinas in the United States and abroad. Transfer credit: CSU.

COUN 656.2 HERMANAS SEMINAR - TRANSITION TO COLLEGE (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester.
This course is designed to help students in understanding and dealing with their personal, social, professional, and cross-cultural concerns in relations to personal development. Transfer credit: CSU.

COUN 657 AUTO GUIDANCE SEMINAR – CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester.
Designed to help students explore and understand academic, career, personal, and cross-cultural topics and issues that influence their education experiences. Topics covered include college success, campus resources, resume writing and interview skills for Automotive Technology professional. Transfer credit: CSU.

COUN 658 ALLIED HEALTH GUIDANCE SEMINAR – CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester.
Designed to help students explore and understand academic, career, personal, and cross-cultural topics and issues that influence their educational experiences. Topics covered include college success, campus resources, resume writing and interview skills for Allied Health Professions. Transfer credit: CSU.

CRER 100 HOW TO SUCCEED IN COLLEGE (1)

(Pass/No Pass.)

This course will provide students with an opportunity to explore their attitudes toward learning and college life. Class activities will include evaluation of individual learning styles and instruction in effective ways of coping with school-related anxiety. Class exercises will help students learn assertiveness and time management skills to enhance their educational experience. Study skills will be included when applicable. Transfer credit: CSU.

CRER 111 DECISION MAKING (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass.)

This course is designed to provide the student with an introduction to the decision making process which stresses the significance of clearly defined values, critical thinking, the importance of gathering and evaluating information, identifying alternatives, and learning about personal risk-taking. Transfer credit: CSU (E1).

CRER 116 DECIDING ON A MAJOR (.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours/semester.

Designed to assist students who are undecided about their career goals and direction. This course will explore the connection between majors and careers and cover common major and academic course work required for these majors. Provides students with personal success tools for identifying their interests, personality and skills and identifying them towards successful major choice. Transfer credit: CSU.

CRER 132 JOB SEARCH (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A course designed to develop practical job search skills to increase the student's options and opportunities for locating immediate and appropriate job sites. Emphasis will be placed on developing the self-knowledge and skills necessary to write a traditional resume, participate in a job interview, and develop a plan of action for employment in the local job market. Transfer credit: CSU (E1).

CRER 135 SKILLS/SELF-ASSESSMENT (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass.)

This course will assist students in assessing their present skills, abilities and preferences and in applying them to decisions regarding future goals and aspirations. Class activities will include a number of self-assessment exercises in which the student will draw from his/her life's experiences to arrive at individualized information necessary for personal, academic and career choices. Transfer credit: CSU (E1).

CRER 136 CAREER PLANNING (.5 ' 1)

(Pass/No Pass.)

This course will assist students in the on-going process of career planning. Class activities will include assessing individual preferences in work environments, people environments, lifestyles, geography and interests. They will provide students with opportunities to use information regarding personal values and functional skills in career planning strategies. Transfer credit: CSU (E1).

CRER 137 LIFE AND CAREER PLANNING (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

This course is designed for the student who is undecided about an occupation. It provides a comprehensive approach to life and career planning. Vocational interest tests, various insights into his/her abilities, interests, and personality. Occupational trends and ways of learning more about specific careers will be explored. Individual conferences are available to students as well as use of the Career Center. Transfer credit: CSU (E1). Note: This course covers material similar to that of CRER 132, 135 and 136 combined.

CRER 139 CAREERS IN TEACHING (.5)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A total of eight lecture hours.

This course provides information regarding requirements to become an elementary or middle/high school teacher or a community college/university professor. Topics include transfer opportunities, financial aid and online resources. Transfer credit: CSU.

CRER 140 PEER COUNSELING (1 or 2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 or ESOL 400.

Prepares students to serve as informational resources to peers. Emphasis on training in basic counseling, assessment, provision of information and referral. Helps students consider their own potential in the 'helping professions.'' Opportunity for supervised field experience. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 3 units. Transfer credit: CSU.

CRER 410 COLLEGE AND CAREER ORIENTATION (.5 or 1 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A comprehensive overview of Skyline College educational programs, services, policies, procedures, effective learning strategies, academic survival skills, awareness of personal development, and additional essential tools and information for successful navigation through the first year at Skyline College. In particular, students will be assisted with the development of a sound student educational plan that is consistent with their academic and career goals. Study skills assessment, time management, personal and social adjustment, interest and aptitude assessment are some of the topics addressed to provide students with the necessary tools to begin their educational experience. Transfer credit: CSU.

CRER 650 GUIDANCE SEMINAR GROUP (.5 or 1 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Designed to help students in understanding and dealing with their personal, social, professional, and cross-cultural concerns. Topics and course descriptions may differ each semester and will be designated in the current class schedule. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

CRER 665SJ STUDENT SUCCESS LEARNING STRATEGIES Designed to increase confidence and develop student's college-level study skills. Students will learn about individual learning styles, memorization skills, effective study habits, and test-taking strategies. Transfer: CSU (E1).
DANC 100 DANCE APPRECIATION (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Designed to give the student an overview of dance history. Beginning with classical era folk and ethnic dance, this course will survey the development of Modern, Ballet, Jazz and other dance forms. Focusing largely on the 20th Century, students will read, write and watch videos to form an overview of the history of dance and the historical events that influenced the major choreographers of the 20th Century. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

DANC 100 DANCE APPRECIATION (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Designed to give the student an overview of dance history. Beginning with classical era folk and ethnic dance, this course will survey the development of Modern, Ballet, Jazz and other dance forms. Focusing largely on the 20th Century, students will read, write and watch videos to form an overview of the history of dance and the historical events that influenced the major choreographers of the 20th Century. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

DANC 105 (C) DANCE AND WELLNESS (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

One and one half or three class hours per week.

This course is designed to introduce students with physical limitations due to injury, illness or physical disability to the fundamentals of dance. Course emphasis is tailored to the development of individuals' creative potential. Students will compose final group projects. Opportunities may include participation in dances choreographed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 105 (C) DANCE AND WELLNESS (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

One and one half or three class hours per week.

This course is designed to introduce students with physical limitations due to injury, illness or physical disability to the fundamentals of dance. Course emphasis is tailored to the development of individuals' creative potential. Students will compose final group projects. Opportunities may include participation in dances choreographed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 117.1 TAP DANCE I (.5-1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester.

Beginning Tap Dance technique. Students will learn tap vocabulary, rhythmic patterns and style while developing dexterity, musicality and basic performance skills. Opportunities will be available to perform, in order to better appreciate tap dance. Choreography and improvisational group projects/presentations develop over the course of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU.

DANC 117.1 TAP DANCE I (.5-1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester.

Beginning Tap Dance technique. Students will learn tap vocabulary, rhythmic patterns and style while developing dexterity, musicality and basic performance skills. Opportunities will be available to perform, in order to better appreciate tap dance. Choreography and improvisational group projects/presentations develop over the course of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU.

DANC 117.2 TAP DANCE II (.5-1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester.

Intermediate Tap Dance technique. Students will learn tap vocabulary, rhythmic patterns and style while developing dexterity, musicality and basic performance skills. Opportunities will be available to perform in order to better appreciate tap dance. Choreography and improvisational group projects/presentations develop over the course of the semester.Transfer credit: CSU.

DANC 117.2 TAP DANCE II (.5-1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester.

Intermediate Tap Dance technique. Students will learn tap vocabulary, rhythmic patterns and style while developing dexterity, musicality and basic performance skills. Opportunities will be available to perform in order to better appreciate tap dance. Choreography and improvisational group projects/presentations develop over the course of the semester.Transfer credit: CSU.

DANC 121.1 MODERN DANCE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Beginning level instruction in the Contemporary Modern Dance style, including warm-up and floor movement with an emphasis on proper techniques, creativity, style and self expression. Students will learn short dance phrases and will be expected to choreograph and perform a modern dance by the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 121.1 MODERN DANCE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Beginning level instruction in the Contemporary Modern Dance style, including warm-up and floor movement with an emphasis on proper techniques, creativity, style and self expression. Students will learn short dance phrases and will be expected to choreograph and perform a modern dance by the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 121.2 MODERN DANCE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intermediate level instruction in the Contemporary Modern Dance style, including warm-up and floor movement with an emphasis on proper techniques, creativity, style and self expression. Students will learn short dance phrases and will be expected to choreograph and perform a modern dance by the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 121.2 MODERN DANCE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intermediate level instruction in the Contemporary Modern Dance style, including warm-up and floor movement with an emphasis on proper techniques, creativity, style and self expression. Students will learn short dance phrases and will be expected to choreograph and perform a modern dance by the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 121.3 MODERN DANCE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced intermediate level instruction in the Contemporary Modern Dance style, including warm-up and floor movement with an emphasis on proper techniques, creativity, style and self expression. Students will learn short dance phrases and will be expected to choreograph and perform a modern dance by the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 121.3 MODERN DANCE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced intermediate level instruction in the Contemporary Modern Dance style, including warm-up and floor movement with an emphasis on proper techniques, creativity, style and self expression. Students will learn short dance phrases and will be expected to choreograph and perform a modern dance by the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 125.1 SALSA I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Beginning techniques of partner salsa dancing. Proper body placement, lead and follow techniques, and stylization applied to dance patterns. Shine steps are covered. Dance etiquette and rhythm of salsa music covered. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 125.1 SALSA I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Beginning techniques of partner salsa dancing. Proper body placement, lead and follow techniques, and stylization applied to dance patterns. Shine steps are covered. Dance etiquette and rhythm of salsa music covered. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 125.2 SALSA II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continuation of DANC 125.1. A thorough review of Salsa I is provided. Intermediate salsa patterns including more complex turns, patterns, and shines are introduced. Greater emphasis on the development of dance stylization, timing, and safety. Student choreography and presentation is encouraged. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 125.2 SALSA II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continuation of DANC 125.1. A thorough review of Salsa I is provided. Intermediate salsa patterns including more complex turns, patterns, and shines are introduced. Greater emphasis on the development of dance stylization, timing, and safety. Student choreography and presentation is encouraged. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 125.3 SALSA III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continuation of DANC 125.2. Includes a quick review of DANC 125.1 and a thorough review of DANC 125.2. More complex patterns are demonstrated and practiced, with emphasis on dance pattern design at the Intermediate/Advanced level. Student choreography and "learning by teaching" is required. Includes emphasis on partner dancing safety and core body awareness, and improving balance, strength, and flexibility in preparation for advanced patterns and stage performance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 125.3 SALSA III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continuation of DANC 125.2. Includes a quick review of DANC 125.1 and a thorough review of DANC 125.2. More complex patterns are demonstrated and practiced, with emphasis on dance pattern design at the Intermediate/Advanced level. Student choreography and "learning by teaching" is required. Includes emphasis on partner dancing safety and core body awareness, and improving balance, strength, and flexibility in preparation for advanced patterns and stage performance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 125.4 SALSA IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continuation of DANC 125.3. Designed for the advanced student who has already demonstrated Intermediate/Advanced ability in lead/follow technique, dance pattern complexity, and proper timing. Longer and more difficult dance combinations are covered without introduction or emphasis of the basics. Choreography of intermediate/advanced shines and partner patterns required. Student learning by teaching required. Performance required. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 125.4 SALSA IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continuation of DANC 125.3. Designed for the advanced student who has already demonstrated Intermediate/Advanced ability in lead/follow technique, dance pattern complexity, and proper timing. Longer and more difficult dance combinations are covered without introduction or emphasis of the basics. Choreography of intermediate/advanced shines and partner patterns required. Student learning by teaching required. Performance required. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 130.1 JAZZ DANCE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This course covers various movement forms with an emphasis on rhythm, style and proper techniques. Students will learn a variety of jazz phrases and will be expected to choreograph and perform a jazz dance at the introductory level by the end of the semester. Transfer credit: UC;CSU (E2).

DANC 130.1 JAZZ DANCE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This course covers various movement forms with an emphasis on rhythm, style and proper techniques. Students will learn a variety of jazz phrases and will be expected to choreograph and perform a jazz dance at the introductory level by the end of the semester. Transfer credit: UC;CSU (E2).

DANC 130.2 JAZZ DANCE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This course covers various movement forms with an emphasis on rhythm, style and proper techniques. Students will learn a variety of jazz phrases and will be expected to choreograph and perform a jazz dance at the intermediate level by the end of the semester. Transfer credit: UC;CSU (E2).

DANC 130.2 JAZZ DANCE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This course covers various movement forms with an emphasis on rhythm, style and proper techniques. Students will learn a variety of jazz phrases and will be expected to choreograph and perform a jazz dance at the intermediate level by the end of the semester. Transfer credit: UC;CSU (E2).

DANC 130.3 JAZZ DANCE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This course covers various movement forms with an emphasis on rhythm, style and proper techniques. Students will learn a variety of jazz phrases and will be expected to choreograph and perform a jazz dance at the advanced intermediate level by the end of the semester. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 130.3 JAZZ DANCE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This course covers various movement forms with an emphasis on rhythm, style and proper techniques. Students will learn a variety of jazz phrases and will be expected to choreograph and perform a jazz dance at the advanced intermediate level by the end of the semester. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANCE 130.4 JAZZ DANCE IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This course covers various movement forms with an emphasis on rhythm, style and proper techniques. Students will learn a variety of jazz phrases and will be expected to choreograph and perform a jazz dance at the advanced level by the end of the semester. Transfer credit: UC;CSU (E2).

DANCE 130.4 JAZZ DANCE IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This course covers various movement forms with an emphasis on rhythm, style and proper techniques. Students will learn a variety of jazz phrases and will be expected to choreograph and perform a jazz dance at the advanced level by the end of the semester. Transfer credit: UC;CSU (E2).

DANC 140.1 BALLET I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Beginning barre, floor technique and movement fundamentals with emphasis on body control, form and special patterns. Students will learn a variety of dance phrases and will be expected to perform a ballet dance at the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 140.1 BALLET I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Beginning barre, floor technique and movement fundamentals with emphasis on body control, form and special patterns. Students will learn a variety of dance phrases and will be expected to perform a ballet dance at the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 140.2 BALLET II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intermediate barre, floor technique and movement fundamentals with emphasis on body control, form and special patterns. Students will learn a variety of dance phrases and will be expected to perform a ballet dance at the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 140.2 BALLET II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intermediate barre, floor technique and movement fundamentals with emphasis on body control, form and special patterns. Students will learn a variety of dance phrases and will be expected to perform a ballet dance at the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 140.3 BALLET III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced intermediate barre, floor technique and movement fundamentals with emphasis on body control, form and special patterns. Students will learn a variety of dance phrases and will be expected to perform a ballet dance at the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 140.3 BALLET III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced intermediate barre, floor technique and movement fundamentals with emphasis on body control, form and special patterns. Students will learn a variety of dance phrases and will be expected to perform a ballet dance at the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 140.4 BALLET IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced barre, floor technique and movement fundamentals with emphasis on body control, form and special patterns. Students will learn a variety of dance phrases and will be expected to perform a ballet dance at the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 140.4 BALLET IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced barre, floor technique and movement fundamentals with emphasis on body control, form and special patterns. Students will learn a variety of dance phrases and will be expected to perform a ballet dance at the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 150.2 HIP HOP II (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester.

Advanced beginning hip-hop dance choreography, alignment, and floor patterns, with group interactions and projects. Students will learn a variety of hip-hop dance phrases, demonstrate knowledge of intermediate hip-hop terminology, and demonstrate correct body alignment as it applies to hip-hop dance. Transfer credit: CSU.

DANC 150.2 HIP HOP II (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester.

Advanced beginning hip-hop dance choreography, alignment, and floor patterns, with group interactions and projects. Students will learn a variety of hip-hop dance phrases, demonstrate knowledge of intermediate hip-hop terminology, and demonstrate correct body alignment as it applies to hip-hop dance. Transfer credit: CSU.

DANC 151.1 SOCIAL DANCE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This is an introductory Social Dance course geared to beginners and taught with an emphasis on the social aspects of dance. The basics of several dance styles are taught, with attention paid to footwork, posture, and the arts of leading, following, and co-creating a dance. Each semester dances are selected from the following list: East Coast Swing, Slow Waltz, Cha cha, Night Club Two- Step, Tango, Foxtrot, Rumba, Merengue and Salsa. Partners are not required; no prior experience needed. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 151.1 SOCIAL DANCE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This is an introductory Social Dance course geared to beginners and taught with an emphasis on the social aspects of dance. The basics of several dance styles are taught, with attention paid to footwork, posture, and the arts of leading, following, and co-creating a dance. Each semester dances are selected from the following list: East Coast Swing, Slow Waltz, Cha cha, Night Club Two- Step, Tango, Foxtrot, Rumba, Merengue and Salsa. Partners are not required; no prior experience needed. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 151.2 SOCIAL DANCE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This Social Dance course is taught with an emphasis on the social aspects of dance. The basics of several dance styles are emphasized, with attention paid to footwork, posture, and the arts of leading, following, and co-creating a dance. Each semester dances are selected from the following list: East Coast Swing, Slow Waltz, Cha cha, Night Club Two- Step, Tango, Foxtrot, Rumba, Merengue and Salsa. Partners are not required; no prior experience needed. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 151.2 SOCIAL DANCE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This Social Dance course is taught with an emphasis on the social aspects of dance. The basics of several dance styles are emphasized, with attention paid to footwork, posture, and the arts of leading, following, and co-creating a dance. Each semester dances are selected from the following list: East Coast Swing, Slow Waltz, Cha cha, Night Club Two- Step, Tango, Foxtrot, Rumba, Merengue and Salsa. Partners are not required; no prior experience needed. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 151.3 SOCIAL DANCE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This Social Dance course is taught with an emphasis on the social aspects of dance. The basics of several dance styles are emphasized, with attention paid to footwork, posture, and the arts of leading, following, and co-creating a dance. Each semester dances are selected from the following list: East Coast Swing, Slow Waltz, Cha cha, Night Club Two- Step, Tango, Foxtrot, Rumba, Merengue and Salsa. Partners are not required; no prior experience needed. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 151.3 SOCIAL DANCE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This Social Dance course is taught with an emphasis on the social aspects of dance. The basics of several dance styles are emphasized, with attention paid to footwork, posture, and the arts of leading, following, and co-creating a dance. Each semester dances are selected from the following list: East Coast Swing, Slow Waltz, Cha cha, Night Club Two- Step, Tango, Foxtrot, Rumba, Merengue and Salsa. Partners are not required; no prior experience needed. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 151.4 SOCIAL DANCE IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This Social Dance course is taught with an emphasis on the social aspects of dance. The basics of several dance styles are emphasized, with attention paid to footwork, posture, and the arts of leading, following, and co-creating a dance. Each semester dances are selected from the following list: East Coast Swing, Slow Waltz, Cha cha, Night Club Two- Step, Tango, Foxtrot, Rumba, Merengue and Salsa. Partners are not required. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 151.4 SOCIAL DANCE IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

This Social Dance course is taught with an emphasis on the social aspects of dance. The basics of several dance styles are emphasized, with attention paid to footwork, posture, and the arts of leading, following, and co-creating a dance. Each semester dances are selected from the following list: East Coast Swing, Slow Waltz, Cha cha, Night Club Two- Step, Tango, Foxtrot, Rumba, Merengue and Salsa. Partners are not required. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 152 CUBAN ROOTS OF SALSA (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

A minimum of 24 or 48 class hours.

Introduction to the fundamentals of Cuban popular dances, including Danzon, Son, Cha Cha Cha, Son Montuno, and Salsa Cubana. With African and European influences, these dances are the conscience of modern day Salsa. Because of these roots, students will develop an authentic base that will serve as a foundation for all Latin social dances. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 152 CUBAN ROOTS OF SALSA (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

A minimum of 24 or 48 class hours.

Introduction to the fundamentals of Cuban popular dances, including Danzon, Son, Cha Cha Cha, Son Montuno, and Salsa Cubana. With African and European influences, these dances are the conscience of modern day Salsa. Because of these roots, students will develop an authentic base that will serve as a foundation for all Latin social dances. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 152.1 CUBAN ROOTS OF SALSA I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

A beginning level course designed to teach the fundamentals of Cuban popular dances, including Danzon, Son, Cha cha cha, Son Montuno, and Salsa Cubana. With African and European influences, these dances are the conscience of modern day Salsa. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 152.1 CUBAN ROOTS OF SALSA I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

A beginning level course designed to teach the fundamentals of Cuban popular dances, including Danzon, Son, Cha cha cha, Son Montuno, and Salsa Cubana. With African and European influences, these dances are the conscience of modern day Salsa. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 152.2 CUBAN ROOTS OF SALSA II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An intermediate level course designed to teach the fundamentals of Cuban popular dances, including Danzon, Son, Cha cha cha, Son Montuno, and Salsa Cubana. With African and European influences, these dances are the conscience of modern day Salsa. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 152.2 CUBAN ROOTS OF SALSA II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An intermediate level course designed to teach the fundamentals of Cuban popular dances, including Danzon, Son, Cha cha cha, Son Montuno, and Salsa Cubana. With African and European influences, these dances are the conscience of modern day Salsa. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 152.3 CUBAN ROOTS OF SALSA III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level course designed to teach the fundamentals of Cuban popular dances, including Danzon, Son, Cha cha cha, Son Montuno, and Salsa Cubana. With African and European influences, these dances are the conscience of modern day Salsa. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 152.3 CUBAN ROOTS OF SALSA III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level course designed to teach the fundamentals of Cuban popular dances, including Danzon, Son, Cha cha cha, Son Montuno, and Salsa Cubana. With African and European influences, these dances are the conscience of modern day Salsa. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 152.4 CUBAN ROOTS OF SALSA IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced level course designed to teach the fundamentals of Cuban popular dances, including Danzon, Son, Cha cha cha, Son Montuno, and Salsa Cubana. With African and European influences, these dances are the conscience of modern day Salsa. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 152.4 CUBAN ROOTS OF SALSA IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced level course designed to teach the fundamentals of Cuban popular dances, including Danzon, Son, Cha cha cha, Son Montuno, and Salsa Cubana. With African and European influences, these dances are the conscience of modern day Salsa. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 161 TANGO ARGENTINO (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester.

Designed to introduce students to the essence of Argentine tango (the dance of love) as well as basic improvisational skills. Viewing tango as a language, students will develop musicality and focus on the connection between partners in order to dance confidently in social settings around the world. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 161 TANGO ARGENTINO (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester.

Designed to introduce students to the essence of Argentine tango (the dance of love) as well as basic improvisational skills. Viewing tango as a language, students will develop musicality and focus on the connection between partners in order to dance confidently in social settings around the world. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 162 TANGO MILONGA (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: DANC 161 or equivalent.

Students will learn more advanced steps which are recognizable from professional tango productions. Tango students will be introduced to Milonga, an Argentine dance which is the precursor to the tango. Viewing tango and Milonga as a language, students will develop musicality and focus on the connection between partners in order to dance confidently in social settings. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 162 TANGO MILONGA (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: DANC 161 or equivalent.

Students will learn more advanced steps which are recognizable from professional tango productions. Tango students will be introduced to Milonga, an Argentine dance which is the precursor to the tango. Viewing tango and Milonga as a language, students will develop musicality and focus on the connection between partners in order to dance confidently in social settings. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 163 TANGO BUENOS AIRES (.5-1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: DANC 161 and 162, or equivalent.

Students will begin to develop more confidence, demystifying and internalizing the tango’s structural elements and intricacies. This class culminates with tango performances. (Open entry.) Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 163 TANGO BUENOS AIRES (.5-1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: DANC 161 and 162, or equivalent.

Students will begin to develop more confidence, demystifying and internalizing the tango’s structural elements and intricacies. This class culminates with tango performances. (Open entry.) Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 164 TANGO DE LA CONFITERIA (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: DANC 161 or equivalent and two years of tango study.

Designed to strip tango down to its joyful essence, with many of the most fun steps of Buenos Aires from the past and today. Focus is on connecting with one’s partner, dancing rhythmically, and feeling harmonious and happy in one’s body, with one’s partner, and with the music. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 164 TANGO DE LA CONFITERIA (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: DANC 161 or equivalent and two years of tango study.

Designed to strip tango down to its joyful essence, with many of the most fun steps of Buenos Aires from the past and today. Focus is on connecting with one’s partner, dancing rhythmically, and feeling harmonious and happy in one’s body, with one’s partner, and with the music. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 165 TANGO PERFORMANCE IMPROVISATION (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: DANC 162 or DANC 164, or equivalent and three years of tango study.

Designed to combine traditional close embrace tango with Tango Nuevo and stage elements to learn to comfortably combine styles improvisationally. Students will learn stage elements and how to use them improvisationally for performance. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 165 TANGO PERFORMANCE IMPROVISATION (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: DANC 162 or DANC 164, or equivalent and three years of tango study.

Designed to combine traditional close embrace tango with Tango Nuevo and stage elements to learn to comfortably combine styles improvisationally. Students will learn stage elements and how to use them improvisationally for performance. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 166 TANGO DE LA GUARDIA VIEJA (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: DANC 161 or equivalent.

With an emphasis on rhythmic precision, students will discover the sweetness of tango. Designed to teach and enforce students’ understanding, appreciation and execution of authentic salon style tango, the mother of all tango styles. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 166 TANGO DE LA GUARDIA VIEJA (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: DANC 161 or equivalent.

With an emphasis on rhythmic precision, students will discover the sweetness of tango. Designed to teach and enforce students’ understanding, appreciation and execution of authentic salon style tango, the mother of all tango styles. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 167 SWING DANCE I (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester.

Beginning level instruction, demonstration and practice in swing dances, such as the Charleston, Lindy Hop, Balboa, Shag, East Coast Swing, and West Coast Swing. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 167 SWING DANCE I (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester.

Beginning level instruction, demonstration and practice in swing dances, such as the Charleston, Lindy Hop, Balboa, Shag, East Coast Swing, and West Coast Swing. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 168 SWING DANCE II (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: DANC 167 or equivalent.

Intermediate instruction, demonstration and practice in swing dances such as the Charleston, Lindy Hop, Balboa, Shag, East Coast Swing and West Coast Swing. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 168 SWING DANCE II (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: DANC 167 or equivalent.

Intermediate instruction, demonstration and practice in swing dances such as the Charleston, Lindy Hop, Balboa, Shag, East Coast Swing and West Coast Swing. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 168 (C) SWING DANCE II (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

A total of 24 or 48 class hours. Prerequisite: DANC 167 or equivalent.

Intermediate instruction, demonstration and practice in swing dances such as the Charleston, Lindy Hop, Balboa, Shag, East Coast Swing and West Coast Swing. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 168 (C) SWING DANCE II (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

A total of 24 or 48 class hours. Prerequisite: DANC 167 or equivalent.

Intermediate instruction, demonstration and practice in swing dances such as the Charleston, Lindy Hop, Balboa, Shag, East Coast Swing and West Coast Swing. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 171 CHINESE DANCE WORKOUT (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

A total of 24 or 48 class hours plus one hour per week by arrangement.

A variety of exercise movements based on Chinese folk, classical, ballet and contemporary dance choreographed to develop muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, cardiovascular endurance, and body composition. Routines will utilize various forms of Chinese dance and music to provide a fitness workout. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

DANC 171 CHINESE DANCE WORKOUT (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

A total of 24 or 48 class hours plus one hour per week by arrangement.

A variety of exercise movements based on Chinese folk, classical, ballet and contemporary dance choreographed to develop muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, cardiovascular endurance, and body composition. Routines will utilize various forms of Chinese dance and music to provide a fitness workout. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

DANC 172.1 CLASSICAL CHINESE DANCE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

A beginning level course designed to teach the fundamentals, body rhythm, bearing, form and aerial techniques of Classical Chinese Dance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 172.1 CLASSICAL CHINESE DANCE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

A beginning level course designed to teach the fundamentals, body rhythm, bearing, form and aerial techniques of Classical Chinese Dance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 172.2 CLASSICAL CHINES DANCE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An intermediate level course designed to teach the fundamentals, body rhythm, bearing, form and aerial techniques of Classical Chinese Dance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 172.2 CLASSICAL CHINES DANCE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An intermediate level course designed to teach the fundamentals, body rhythm, bearing, form and aerial techniques of Classical Chinese Dance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 172.3 CLASSICAL CHINESE DANCE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level course designed to teach the fundamentals, body rhythm, bearing, form and aerial techniques of Classical Chinese Dance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 172.3 CLASSICAL CHINESE DANCE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level course designed to teach the fundamentals, body rhythm, bearing, form and aerial techniques of Classical Chinese Dance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 172.4 CLASSICAL CHINES DANCE IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced level course designed to teach the fundamentals, body rhythm, bearing, form and aerial techniques of Classical Chinese Dance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 172.4 CLASSICAL CHINES DANCE IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced level course designed to teach the fundamentals, body rhythm, bearing, form and aerial techniques of Classical Chinese Dance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 260 TANGO TEACHER TRAINING (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: DANC 162 or equivalent.

Designed to prepare intermediate and advanced tango students to become tango teachers. Under supervision, the student teachers learn to teach beginning dancers the art of Argentine Tango while developing their own skills. Guidance is provided for students seeking employment as tango teachers. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 260 TANGO TEACHER TRAINING (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: DANC 162 or equivalent.

Designed to prepare intermediate and advanced tango students to become tango teachers. Under supervision, the student teachers learn to teach beginning dancers the art of Argentine Tango while developing their own skills. Guidance is provided for students seeking employment as tango teachers. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 330.1 CREATIVE DANCE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Beginning level instruction on the principles of dance composition through individual experiences, studies in use of varied stimuli, processes of dance construction and simple compositional forms. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 330.1 CREATIVE DANCE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Beginning level instruction on the principles of dance composition through individual experiences, studies in use of varied stimuli, processes of dance construction and simple compositional forms. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 330.2 CREATIVE DANCE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intermediate level instruction on the principles of dance composition through individual experiences, studies in use of varied stimuli, processes of dance construction and simple compositional forms. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 330.2 CREATIVE DANCE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intermediate level instruction on the principles of dance composition through individual experiences, studies in use of varied stimuli, processes of dance construction and simple compositional forms. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 330.3 CREATIVE DANCE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced intermediate level instruction on the principles of dance composition through individual experiences, studies in use of varied stimuli, processes of dance construction and simple compositional forms. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 330.3 CREATIVE DANCE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced intermediate level instruction on the principles of dance composition through individual experiences, studies in use of varied stimuli, processes of dance construction and simple compositional forms. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 330.4 CREATIVE DANCE IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced level instruction on the principles of dance composition through individual experiences, studies in use of varied stimuli, processes of dance construction and simple compositional forms. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 330.4 CREATIVE DANCE IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced level instruction on the principles of dance composition through individual experiences, studies in use of varied stimuli, processes of dance construction and simple compositional forms. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 350.1 CARDIO DANCE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Steps, stretches and toning movements from many dance sources, folk, jazz, ballet, modern, rock, etc., that are choreographed to various rhythms designed to develop cardiovascular efficiency at a beginning level. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 350.1 CARDIO DANCE I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Steps, stretches and toning movements from many dance sources, folk, jazz, ballet, modern, rock, etc., that are choreographed to various rhythms designed to develop cardiovascular efficiency at a beginning level. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 350.2 CARDIO DANCE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Steps, stretches and toning movements from many dance sources, folk, jazz, ballet, modern, rock, etc., that are choreographed to various rhythms designed to develop cardiovascular efficiency at an intermediate level. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 350.2 CARDIO DANCE II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Steps, stretches and toning movements from many dance sources, folk, jazz, ballet, modern, rock, etc., that are choreographed to various rhythms designed to develop cardiovascular efficiency at an intermediate level. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 350.3 CARDIO DANCE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Steps, stretches and toning movements from many dance sources, folk, jazz, ballet, modern, rock, etc., that are choreographed to various rhythms designed to develop cardiovascular efficiency at an advanced intermediate level. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 350.3 CARDIO DANCE III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Steps, stretches and toning movements from many dance sources, folk, jazz, ballet, modern, rock, etc., that are choreographed to various rhythms designed to develop cardiovascular efficiency at an advanced intermediate level. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 350.4 CARDIO DANCE IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Steps, stretches and toning movements from many dance sources, folk, jazz, ballet, modern, rock, etc., that are choreographed to various rhythms designed to develop cardiovascular efficiency at an advanced level. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 350.4 CARDIO DANCE IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Steps, stretches and toning movements from many dance sources, folk, jazz, ballet, modern, rock, etc., that are choreographed to various rhythms designed to develop cardiovascular efficiency at an advanced level. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 390 (C) DANCE COMPOSITION/THEORY/CHOREOGRAPHY (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

Three lecture hours per week.

This course is designed to introduce the student to aesthetic, philosophical and theoretical concepts regarding composition. Designed for both the serious dance student as well as students interested in exploring a new art form. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

DANC 390 (C) DANCE COMPOSITION/THEORY/CHOREOGRAPHY (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

Three lecture hours per week.

This course is designed to introduce the student to aesthetic, philosophical and theoretical concepts regarding composition. Designed for both the serious dance student as well as students interested in exploring a new art form. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

DANC 391 DANCE COMPOSITION – THEORY AND CHOREOGRAPHY (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Provides the student with basic skills and knowledge of the choreographic principles. Through discussion and practical experience, the students develop a basic understanding of dance as a performing art form. Study of basic dance choreography to include construction of a phrase, structure and form in a composition, and the basic elements of time, space and energy. Transfer: CSU.

DANC 391 DANCE COMPOSITION – THEORY AND CHOREOGRAPHY (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Provides the student with basic skills and knowledge of the choreographic principles. Through discussion and practical experience, the students develop a basic understanding of dance as a performing art form. Study of basic dance choreography to include construction of a phrase, structure and form in a composition, and the basic elements of time, space and energy. Transfer: CSU.

DANC 395.1 DANCE WORKSHOP I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide a structured workshop for students to collaborate and develop choreographic works at the beginning level. Students will dance in other students' work, and may also choreograph their own pieces. Students will perform these works for peer analysis and performance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 395.1 DANCE WORKSHOP I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide a structured workshop for students to collaborate and develop choreographic works at the beginning level. Students will dance in other students' work, and may also choreograph their own pieces. Students will perform these works for peer analysis and performance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 395.2 DANCE WORKSHOP II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide a structured workshop for students to collaborate and develop choreographic works at the intermediate level. Students will dance in other students' work, and may also choreograph their own pieces. Students will perform these works for peer analysis and performance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 395.2 DANCE WORKSHOP II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide a structured workshop for students to collaborate and develop choreographic works at the intermediate level. Students will dance in other students' work, and may also choreograph their own pieces. Students will perform these works for peer analysis and performance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 395.3 DANCE WORKSHOP III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide a structured workshop for students to collaborate and develop choreographic works at the advanced intermediate level. Students will dance in other students' work, and may also choreograph their own pieces. Students will perform these works for peer analysis and performance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 395.3 DANCE WORKSHOP III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide a structured workshop for students to collaborate and develop choreographic works at the advanced intermediate level. Students will dance in other students' work, and may also choreograph their own pieces. Students will perform these works for peer analysis and performance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 395.4 DANCE WORKSHOP IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide a structured workshop for students to collaborate and develop choreographic works at the advanced level. Students will dance in other students' work, and may also choreograph their own pieces. Students will perform these works for peer analysis and performance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 395.4 DANCE WORKSHOP IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide a structured workshop for students to collaborate and develop choreographic works at the advanced level. Students will dance in other students' work, and may also choreograph their own pieces. Students will perform these works for peer analysis and performance. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 400.1 DANCE PERFORMANCE & PRODUCTION I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Beginning level theory and practice in dance composition, evaluation and program production. Students will become familiar with all types of choreography principles and stage production. Includes emphasis on a variety of dance forms from traditional Western European to ethnic. Rehearsal times will be arranged with the instructor. NOTE: Students wishing to fulfill the requirement for the Dance Major should enroll in 2 units. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 400.1 DANCE PERFORMANCE & PRODUCTION I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Beginning level theory and practice in dance composition, evaluation and program production. Students will become familiar with all types of choreography principles and stage production. Includes emphasis on a variety of dance forms from traditional Western European to ethnic. Rehearsal times will be arranged with the instructor. NOTE: Students wishing to fulfill the requirement for the Dance Major should enroll in 2 units. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 400.2 DANCE PERFORMANCE & PRODUCTION II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intermediate level theory and practice in dance composition, evaluation and program production. Students will become familiar with all types of choreography principles and stage production. Includes emphasis on a variety of dance forms from traditional Western European to ethnic. Rehearsal times will be arranged with the instructor. NOTE: Students wishing to fulfill the requirement for the Dance Major should enroll in 2 units. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 400.2 DANCE PERFORMANCE & PRODUCTION II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intermediate level theory and practice in dance composition, evaluation and program production. Students will become familiar with all types of choreography principles and stage production. Includes emphasis on a variety of dance forms from traditional Western European to ethnic. Rehearsal times will be arranged with the instructor. NOTE: Students wishing to fulfill the requirement for the Dance Major should enroll in 2 units. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 400.3 DANCE PERFORMANCE & PRODUCTION III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced Intermediate level theory and practice in dance composition, evaluation and program production. Students will become familiar with all types of choreography principles and stage production. Includes emphasis on a variety of dance forms from traditional Western European to ethnic. Rehearsal times will be arranged with the instructor. NOTE: Students wishing to fulfill the requirement for the Dance Major should enroll in 2 units. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 400.3 DANCE PERFORMANCE & PRODUCTION III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced Intermediate level theory and practice in dance composition, evaluation and program production. Students will become familiar with all types of choreography principles and stage production. Includes emphasis on a variety of dance forms from traditional Western European to ethnic. Rehearsal times will be arranged with the instructor. NOTE: Students wishing to fulfill the requirement for the Dance Major should enroll in 2 units. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 400.4 DANCE PERFORMANCE & PRODUCTION IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced level theory and practice in dance composition, evaluation and program production. Students will become familiar with all types of choreography principles and stage production. Includes emphasis on a variety of dance forms from traditional Western European to ethnic. Rehearsal times will be arranged with the instructor. NOTE: Students wishing to fulfill the requirement for the Dance Major should enroll in 2 units. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 400.4 DANCE PERFORMANCE & PRODUCTION IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced level theory and practice in dance composition, evaluation and program production. Students will become familiar with all types of choreography principles and stage production. Includes emphasis on a variety of dance forms from traditional Western European to ethnic. Rehearsal times will be arranged with the instructor. NOTE: Students wishing to fulfill the requirement for the Dance Major should enroll in 2 units. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 410.1 DANCE FOR THE MUSICAL THEATER PRODUCTION I (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester.

Beginning level theory and practice in dance composition, performance and program production, designed to prepare students to perform in a musical theater production. Activities include learning dance technique and choreography that will be utilized in performance. Lecture subjects cover the historical context of the libretto, costuming and choreography specific to the production. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 410.1 DANCE FOR THE MUSICAL THEATER PRODUCTION I (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester.

Beginning level theory and practice in dance composition, performance and program production, designed to prepare students to perform in a musical theater production. Activities include learning dance technique and choreography that will be utilized in performance. Lecture subjects cover the historical context of the libretto, costuming and choreography specific to the production. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 410.2 DANCE FOR THE MUSICAL THEATER PRODUCTION II (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester.

Intermediate level theory and practice in dance composition, performance and program production, designed to prepare students to perform in a musical theater production. Activities include learning dance technique and choreography that will be utilized in performance. Lecture subjects cover the historical context of the libretto, costuming and choreography specific to the production. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 410.2 DANCE FOR THE MUSICAL THEATER PRODUCTION II (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester.

Intermediate level theory and practice in dance composition, performance and program production, designed to prepare students to perform in a musical theater production. Activities include learning dance technique and choreography that will be utilized in performance. Lecture subjects cover the historical context of the libretto, costuming and choreography specific to the production. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 410.3 DANCE FOR THE MUSICAL THEATER PRODUCTION III (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester.

Advanced intermediate level theory and practice in dance composition, performance and program production, designed to prepare students to perform in a musical theater production. Activities include learning dance technique and choreography that will be utilized in performance. Lecture subjects cover the historical context of the libretto, costuming and choreography specific to the production. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 410.3 DANCE FOR THE MUSICAL THEATER PRODUCTION III (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester.

Advanced intermediate level theory and practice in dance composition, performance and program production, designed to prepare students to perform in a musical theater production. Activities include learning dance technique and choreography that will be utilized in performance. Lecture subjects cover the historical context of the libretto, costuming and choreography specific to the production. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 410.4 DANCE FOR THE MUSICAL THEATER PRODUCTION IV (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester.

Advanced level theory and practice in dance composition, performance and program production, designed to prepare students to perform in a musical theater production. Activities include learning dance technique and choreography that will be utilized in performance. Lecture subjects cover the historical context of the libretto, costuming and choreography specific to the production. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 410.4 DANCE FOR THE MUSICAL THEATER PRODUCTION IV (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester.

Advanced level theory and practice in dance composition, performance and program production, designed to prepare students to perform in a musical theater production. Activities include learning dance technique and choreography that will be utilized in performance. Lecture subjects cover the historical context of the libretto, costuming and choreography specific to the production. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

DANC 440 (C) PRINCIPLES OF DANCE COMPANY/ARTS PROGRAM MANAGEMENT (.5-2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

One and one half to six class hours and two to five hours by arrangement per week.

This course includes all phases of arts event planning: creating an event calendar; performance themes and standards; funding and budgeting; and promotion and publicity. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. (Open entry.) May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.
DANC 440 (C) PRINCIPLES OF DANCE COMPANY/ARTS PROGRAM MANAGEMENT (.5-2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

One and one half to six class hours and two to five hours by arrangement per week.

This course includes all phases of arts event planning: creating an event calendar; performance themes and standards; funding and budgeting; and promotion and publicity. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. (Open entry.) May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.
DANC 665 SELECTED TOPICS: DANCE IN CULTURAL CONTEXT (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester.

Designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of different styles of dance from selected cultures. It is designed for the serious dancer interested in learning ethnic dance forms as well as the general student. In-depth study of selected dance forms such as Flamenco, Congolese, and Capoeria. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 665 SELECTED TOPICS: DANCE IN CULTURAL CONTEXT (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester.

Designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of different styles of dance from selected cultures. It is designed for the serious dancer interested in learning ethnic dance forms as well as the general student. In-depth study of selected dance forms such as Flamenco, Congolese, and Capoeria. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

DANC 665SI CHINESE ETHNIC AND FOLK DANCE Designed to introduce students to the many forms of Chinese Ethnic and Folk Dance passed down through the centuries. Emphasis is placed on cultural expression through movements, postures and aesthetics. Transfer: UC; CSU (E2).
DANC 665SI CHINESE ETHNIC AND FOLK DANCE Designed to introduce students to the many forms of Chinese Ethnic and Folk Dance passed down through the centuries. Emphasis is placed on cultural expression through movements, postures and aesthetics. Transfer: UC; CSU (E2).
DANC 665SJ MUSICAL THEATER DANCE Designed to prepare students to perform in a musical theater production conducted on campus. Activities include learning jazz technique and choreography that will be utilized in performance. All levels of dance skill are welcome. Transfer: UC; CSU (E2).
DANC 665SJ MUSICAL THEATER DANCE Designed to prepare students to perform in a musical theater production conducted on campus. Activities include learning jazz technique and choreography that will be utilized in performance. All levels of dance skill are welcome. Transfer: UC; CSU (E2).
DANC 665SK WORLD BEAT DANCE WORKOUT (0.5 or 1.0) (Pass no pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. An intense cardio workout combined with strength training using rhythm, movements, and dance techniques. Set to high energy music from around the world. Perfect for any level of dancer/fitness enthusiast. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).
DANC 665SK WORLD BEAT DANCE WORKOUT (0.5 or 1.0) (Pass no pass or letter grade.) Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. An intense cardio workout combined with strength training using rhythm, movements, and dance techniques. Set to high energy music from around the world. Perfect for any level of dancer/fitness enthusiast. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).
DANC 680SB DANCE/CHEER SQUAD Focus on the individual and team skills necessary for a successful dance/cheer team. Emphasis on the fundamentals of dance technique, choreography, performance in conjunction with leadership skills and crowd motivation. Performance at athletics events, campus functions and team competitions is mandatory. Plus two hours by arrangement per week. Transfer: CSU.
DANC 680SB DANCE/CHEER SQUAD Focus on the individual and team skills necessary for a successful dance/cheer team. Emphasis on the fundamentals of dance technique, choreography, performance in conjunction with leadership skills and crowd motivation. Performance at athletics events, campus functions and team competitions is mandatory. Plus two hours by arrangement per week. Transfer: CSU.
DANC 680SC%DANCE APPRECIATION An online course designed to give the student an overview of dance history. Beginning with classical era folk and ethnic dance, this course will survey the development of Modern, Ballet, Jazz and other dance forms. Focusing largely on the 20th Century, students will read, write, and watch videos to form an overview of the history of dance and the historical events that influenced the major choreographers of the 20th Century. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. Transfer: CSU.
DANC 680SC%DANCE APPRECIATION An online course designed to give the student an overview of dance history. Beginning with classical era folk and ethnic dance, this course will survey the development of Modern, Ballet, Jazz and other dance forms. Focusing largely on the 20th Century, students will read, write, and watch videos to form an overview of the history of dance and the historical events that influenced the major choreographers of the 20th Century. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. Transfer: CSU.


DRAM 200 Theory of Acting I (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.
Develop beginning level performance skills through emotional and sense memory techniques; physical exercises designed to increase body awareness, authentic expression, and control; and vocal exercises focusing on articulation, projection, and creative expression. Acquire confidence, range, and subtlety through improvisation, monologue, and scene work. Gain insight and inspiration through text-based critical analysis. Transfer credit: CSU.

DRAM 201 ADVANCED Acting I (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: DRAM 201 or equivalent.
Continuing development of performance skills/knowledge through methods and techniques explored in DRAM 200. Employment of more complex physical,psychological and emotionally challenging monologues and scenes involving both classical and contemporary text, and short plays. Deepening of emotional authenticity and refinement of creative expression as an ensemble player. Use of advanced text-based critical analysis for the building of ensemble work. Transfer credit: CSU.

DRAM 202 ADVANCED ACTING II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: DRAM 201 or equivalent.

Exploration of the actor's place in the context of the play including use of symbolism and historical/social concepts that shape the actor's approach in creating truthful character-centered performances. Continued exploration of theories and techniques used in the interpretation of Drama through character analysis, monologues and scenes. Transfer credit: CSU.


DRAM 208 ACTING PRACTICUM I (acting laboratory) (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 96 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in DRAM 200, or equivalent.
Supervised rehearsals of improvisations, monologue/oral readings and short scenes. Forms and styles of acting at a beginning level. Exercises in the use of mind, emotions, voice, and body in acting. Acting scenes for drama classes and others. Emphasis on coaching by the instructor and the students preparing of scenes for performance. Transfer credit: CSU.

DRAM 310 Technical Production/Stagecraft (3)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 96 lab hours by arrangement/semester.
Designed to teach the basic principles, history and practice of Technical Production for the performing arts and help students acquire a general understanding of the functional process behind the production and development of live performances. This course requires working on actual productions on weekends and evenings. Transfer credit: CSU.

DRAM 311 THEATRICAL SOUND/AUDIO PRODUCTION (3)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to teach the basic principles, history, and practice of Stagecraft in the discipline of Sound/Audio Production for the performing arts and help students acquire a general understanding of the functional process behind the production and development of live performances. This course requires evening and weekend work on actual productions.Transfer credit: CSU.

DRAM 312 THEATRICAL LIGHTING/BASIC ELECTRICAL THEORY (3)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 96 lab hours/semester. Designed to teach the basic principles, history, and practice of Stagecraft in the discipline of Theatrical Lighting/Basic Electrical Theory for the performing arts with emphasis on equipment, control, color and their relationship to design. This course will help students acquire a general understanding of the functional process behind the production and development of live performances. This course requires evening and weekend work on actual productions.Transfer credit: CSU.

DRAM 313 STAGE CARPENTRY AND RIGGING (3)>/b>

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to teach the basic principles, history, and practice of Stagecraft in the discipline of Stage Carpentry and Rigging for the performing arts and help students acquire a general understanding of the functional process behind the production and development of live performances. This course requires evening and weekend work on actual productions.Transfer credit: CSU.

DSKL 811 DIFFERENTIAL LEARNING SKILLS ASSESSMENT (.5)

(Pass/No Pass)

A total of eight lecture hours: four scheduled class hours and four hours per student by arrangement, or eight hours by arrangement only.

Assessment to determine specific learning profile and academic skill levels. Students will receive information demonstrating the relationship of learning profile to academic performance and presence or absence of significant learning differences. Based upon assessment data, eligible students will receive recommendations for ADA academic accommodations and individualized learning strategies. NOTE: This course has a non-refundable materials charge of $15. May be repeated once for credit. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

DSKL 817 ASSISTIVE COMPUTER ACCESS (.5-3)
(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24 lab hours for each .5 unit.
Designed primarily for students with disabilities, this course provides training in the use of computer access technologies that enhance a student’s ability to access and use microcomputers. Students will use the technology as a tool to complete assignments from concurrent subject area courses. No previous computer experience is required. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


DSKL 820 COMPUTER-BASED COGNITIVE RETRAINING (.5)

(Pass/No Pass.)
Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester.

Designed primarily for students recovering from an acquired brain injury/impairment such as head trauma or stroke, this course uses computer-based applications to provide cognitive retraining. Areas addressed include the application of memory, problem-solving, critical thinking, logic, and organizational skills to daily activities and functioning. No previous computer experience is required. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


DSKL 821 DEVELOPMENT OF SELF-ADVOCACY SKILLS: PERSONAL EMPOWERMENT FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (.5)
(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours/semester.
Exploration of self-advocacy strategies for students eligible for ADA academic accommodations. Prepares students to advocate effectively for implementation of accommodations requests both inside and outside the classroom. Includes introduction to development of informational, intra/interpersonal skills, neurology of learning disabilities/differences, rights and responsibilities, procedures and related issues. Students will participate in small group activities, including role-play. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

DSKL 822 STUDY SMART SKILLS (1)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester.

Strategies to improve mathematics, reading, writing, study, and test-taking skills for students with learning differences. Applicable study techniques using triple strength learning: seeing, saying, and writing. Prepares students for self advocacy by empowering them with the tools necessary to succeed. Hands-on activities and group work. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

DSKL 825 ASSISTIVE COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY (1)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A total of 16 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement.

Designed primarily for students with disabilities, this course provides training in the use of computer-based assistive technology that supports students' learning styles and/or physical needs. Students will use the assistive technology as a tool to complete assignments from concurrent subject area classes. No previous computer experience is required (Open entry.) May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

DSKL 825.1 Assistive Computer Technology - Kurzweil 3000 I (1)
(Pass/No Pass.)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester.
Designed primarily for students with disabilities; provides training in the use of the text-to-speech program Kurzweil 3000, which supports students’ learning styles and/or physical needs in the area of reading and studying their textbooks. Students will learn how to use this assistive technology tool as an accommodation for reading and studying electronic versions of their textbooks and completing tests/exams from concurrent subject area classes. No previous computer experience is required. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


DSKL 826.1 Assistive Computer Technology - Dragon NaturallySpeaking I (1)
(Pass/No Pass.)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester.
Designed primarily for students with disabilities; provides training in the use of the speech recognition program Dragon NaturallySpeaking, which supports students’  learning styles and/or physical needs in the area of written expression. Students will learn how to use this assistive technology tool as an accommodation for completing written assignments and essay-based tests/exams from concurrent subject area classes. No previous computer experience is required. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ECE. 201 CHILD DEVELOPMENT (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Examination of the major physical, psychosocial and cognitive/language developmental milestones for children, both typical and atypical, from conception through adolescence. Emphasis on interactions between maturational processes and environmental factors, While studying developmental theory and investigative research methodologies, students will observe children, evaluate individual differences, and analyze characteristics of development at various stages. Also listed as PSYC 201. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3, E1).

ECE. 201 CHILD DEVELOPMENT (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

In-depth exploration of areas and issues of major importance in the field of child development. Focuses on personality, intellectual, social, and physical factors. Theoretical concepts, practical application, and current research are covered. Also listed as PSYC 201. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3, E1.)

ECE. 210 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PRINCIPLES (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Overview of the history, nature, and goals of Early Childhood Education. Exploration of various program models in ECE, current issues, and long-range trends. Qualifications and training required for teachers of young children. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 211 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION CURRICULUM (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An overview of knowledge and skills related to providing appropriate curriculum and environments for young children from birth to age 8. Students will examine a teacher’s role in supporting development and fostering the joy of learning for all young children using observation and assessment strategies emphasizing the essential role of play. An overview of content areas will include, but not be limited to, language and literacy, social and emotional learning, sensory learning, art and creativity, and math and science. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 212 CHILD, FAMILY, AND COMMUNITY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An overview of contemporary family and community issues influencing childhood. Interactions among the child, family, school, peers, media, and the community are explored. The course focuses on the socialization process, including cultural and ethnic diversity, parenting styles, gender roles, and the role of the community. Community resources available to children and families are also covered. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


ECE. 213 THE SCHOOL-AGE CHILD (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.
Relevant and responsible program planning for before- and after-school child care. The developmental needs of the child 6 to 12 years of age (middle childhood), family involvement and implications, and available community resources for systematic out-of-school care for elementary-aged children are included. Transfer credit: CSU.

ECE. 214 CHILD-PARENT RELATIONS (3)

Three lecture hours per week.

Emotional, social, intellectual and physical development of children with an emphasis on a multicultural approach to parent-child relations, diversity of family systems in today's society, and how these influence the developing child. Also listed as FCS 213. Transfer credit: CSU (E1.)


ECE. 223 INFANT/TODDLER DEVELOPMENT (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An introduction to the development of children from birth to three years with an emphasis on social, emotional and physical milestones, early learning and brain development, atypical development, temperament, child behavior, and behavior issues related to varied impairments, and the importance of family partnerships. It covers trends in early care and education, the variances of child abilities between children and due to developmental delays and the influences of families and the environment. Transfer credit: CSU.

ECE. 225 INFANT/TODDLER ENVIRONMENTS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An introduction to the design, maintenance and evaluation of quality infant/toddler and early intervention environments for children birth to three years of age. Emphasis is placed on the California State Department of Education “Infant Toddler Learning and Development Program Guidelines.” Transfer credit: CSU.

ECE. 240 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION: BUSINESS/LEGAL (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836 or ENGL 846 or equivalent, plus the 12 ECE core units.

An overview of the business aspects of caring for children in early childhood settings and its social, political and economic implications. Included are the legal and regulatory requirements for early childhood settings, laws relating to child care, and facets of business and fiscal management. This course is open to all students but is specifically designed for those needing to meet state licensing requirements for ECE Program Directors. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 241 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION: HUMAN RELATIONS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent, plus the 12 ECE core units.
Focus on the human relations components of operating an early childhood setting and the social, political and economic implications for ECE professionals and parents. Other topics include staffing, supervision, licenses and/or credentials for staff, assessment and evaluation, state and federal regulations governing employment, issues in ECE, and parent involvement. This course is open to all students but is specifically designed for those needing to meet state licensing requirements for ECE Program Directors. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 242 ADULT SUPERVISION IN ECE/CD CLASSROOMS (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A study of the methods and principles of supervising student teachers, assistant teachers, parents, and volunteers in ECE education settings. Emphasis is on the role of classroom teachers who function as mentors to new teachers while simultaneously addressing the needs of children, parents, and other staff. Although this course is open to all students, it is specifically designed for those needing to meet state licensing requirements for ECE Masters Teachers, Site Directors, and Program Directors. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 244 PREKINDERGARTEN LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A review of the criteria for high quality prekindergarten/preschool experiences for young children. Students will examine program and curriculum guidelines that are necessary in order to support children’s emerging foundational skills and their transition to kindergarten. Topics covered include the political, economic, developmental and current issues related to kindergarten readiness and later school success. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 260 CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An overview of the issues related to children with special needs. Special needs refer to physical, sensory, communicative and behavioral disabilities. Additional topics include a historical perspective, current laws and legislation, inclusion practices in early childhood education settings, and appropriate community resources. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 261 EARLY INTERVENTION PRACTICES (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ECE. 260 or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Major elements of Early Intervention programs for children birth to three years, with an emphasis on partnerships with families, assessment, health and safety issues, typical and atypical development, and the individual family school plan (IFSP) process, Infant-Toddler learning foundations and the referral process are included. Transfer credit: CSU.

ECE. 262 INTRODUCTION TO FAMILY SUPPORT: BUILDING RESPECTFUL PARTNERSHIPS (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or equivalent.

An overview of family support programs within early childhood education. Included will be a historical perspective, family support principles and effective communication guides between families, child care providers, teachers and community agencies. This course is one of two (with ECE. 264) for a specialization for Master Teacher on the Child Development Permit matrix. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 263 Strategies for Children with Special Needs (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ECE. 260 or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400 or equivalent.
Focus on practical applications of best practices in Early Childhood Special Education. Topics covered include curriculum modification strategies to facilitate the development of cognitive, motor, social, emotional and language skills in young children with special needs (preschool, TK, and kindergarten age). Specific course foci include developing positive behavior management plans, collaborative teaching, integrative lesson planning that embed intervention strategies across routines and activities in both inclusive and self-contained classrooms, and methods for working with and parents of young children with special needs.  Transfer credit: CSU.

ECE. 264 THE LIFE CYCLE OF THE FAMILY (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or equivalent.

An overview of the life cycle of the family. The course bridges individual and family development with cultural and social perspectives. Emphasis is on the diversity within contemporary families and the establishment of family support programs. This course is one of two (with ECE. 262) for a specialization for Master Teacher on the Child Development Permit matrix. Transfer credit: CSU.

ECE. 270 INTRODUCTION TO INFANT/TODDLER CHILD CARE (3)

Three lecture hours per week.

This course will focus on caring for infants and toddlers in group child care settings. Topics will include: social-emotional growth and development, routines and environments, language development, physical development, cognitive development, and caring for infants and toddlers in the context of family and culture. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 272 TEACHING IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Examination of the development of social identities in diverse societies, including theoretical and practical implications of culture, ethnicity, stereotyping and bias as they apply to young children, families, programs, classrooms and teaching. Various classroom strategies will be explored emphasizing culturally and linguistically appropriate anti-bias approaches supporting all children in becoming competent members of a diverse sociatey. Course includes self-examination and reflection on issues relate to social identity, stereotypes and bias. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 273 SUPPORTING YOUNG BILINGUAL LEARNERS (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Satisfactory completion of ECE./PSYC 201 and ECE. 211, or equivalent.
Focus on practical and research-based strategies for supporting dual language learners in developing a strong literacy base in both English and their home languages. Students will learn about evidence-based strategies that can enhance children’s sense of identity and self-esteem; factors shown through research to influence the quality of children’s learning experiences and therefore their future academic success. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 275 CHILDREN’S LANGUAGE AND LITERACY DEVELOPMENT (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A concentration on children’s language and literacy development in early childhood settings with diverse learners. Primary topic areas are: the building blocks of language and literacy development including oral language, phonological awareness, alphabet knowledge and print awareness; meaningful social conversations including language involved in peer interactions; the process of second language acquisition; culturally inclusive teacher-family partnerships; and culturally and linguistically responsive classroom strategies for supporting children’s language and literacy development. Transfer credit: CSU.

ECE. 311 CHILDREN'S NUTRITION (1)

A total of 16 lecture hours. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

This course is designed to assist the parents of young children to develop an understanding of how nutrition contributes to mental and physical growth. The student will learn ways to teach these principles to young children. Simple food preparation techniques and an examination of current literature. Also listed as FCS 311. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 314 HEALTH, SAFETY AND NUTRITION FOR YOUNG CHILDREN (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Introduction to the laws, regulations, standards, policies and procedures and early childhood curriculum related to child health safety and nutrition. The key components that ensure physical health, mental health and safety for both children and staff will be identified along with the importance of collaboration with families and health professionals. Focus on integrating the concepts into everyday planning and program development for all children. Also listed as HSCI 314. Transfer credit: CSU.

ECE. 333 OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Focus on the appropriate use of assessment and observation strategies to document development, growth, play and learning to join with families and professionals in promoting children’s success. Recording strategies, rating systems, portfolios, and multiple assessment tools are explored. Required course for the ECE Certificate and A.S. Degree program; also useful for Psychology and other Social Science majors who will be observing human behavior. Transfer credit: CSU.

ECE. 335 CHILD GUIDANCE (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An introductory course in child guidance and discipline for teachers, caregivers and parents provides an overview of the complexity of children’s behavior and how to address it constructively. Theories and trends concerning child guidance are introduced to help students understand the purposes for children’s behavior. Students will gain a developmental outlook on children, increase their repertoire of strategies in how they interact with them, explore methods of planning and setting goals for children, and evaluate their behavior through observation. Emphasis on the important relationship between child development and guidance strategies and the value of play as it relates to children’s learning. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 339 SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING FUNDAMENTALS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
This course assists early childhood professionals and parents in understanding and addressing children's challenging behaviors. The main areas of focus will be defining challenging behaviors, exploring prevention and intervention strategies, and understanding the behavioral planning process. The teaching pyramid will be presented as a model for promoting children's social emotional development and preventing challenging behaviors. This course, along with ECE. 335, is required for a Master Teacher specialization, as noted in the Child Development Permit matrix. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 360 ADVOCACY IN THE EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A focus on the importance of advocacy for early childhood professionals to improve the lives of children, to determine how the public and public policies affect the field of education, and to realize the need of a strong united voice to foster change. The course includes an introduction to labor organizing and information on the path of legislation. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 366 PRACTICUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 96 lab hours/semester.  Prerequisite: ECE. 201, ECE. 210, ECE. 211 and ECE. 212. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A demonstration of developmentally appropriate early childhood teaching competencies under guided supervision at approved sites. Students will utilize practical classroom experiences to make connections between theory and practice, develop professional behaviors, and build a comprehensive understanding of children and families. Child centered, play-oriented approaches to teaching, learning, and assessment; and knowledge of curriculum content areas will be emphasized as student teachers design, implement and evaluate experiences that promote positive development and learning for all young children. It is required for the ECE certificate and AS degree program, meets the supervised teaching requirement for the California State Child Development teaching permit, and provides student teaching experience in qualified settings that serve children from infancy through middle childhood. Placements at approved sites only. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 367 PRACTICUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION: SPECIAL TOPICS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 96 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: ECE. 201, ECE. 210, ECE. 260 and ECE. 263, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A demonstration of developmentally appropriate early childhood teaching competencies under guided supervision. Students will utilize practical classroom experiences to make connections between theory and practice, develop professional behaviors, and build a comprehensive understanding of children and families. Required for the ECSE certificate; meets the supervised teaching requirement for the California State CD teaching permit, and provides student teaching experience in qualified settings that serve children from infancy through middle childhood. Transfer credit: CSU.


ECE. 665 SELECTED TOPICS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours for each .5 unit.
This course is designed to develop specific skills that are utilized in Early Childhood Education environments. The course will focus on one specific topic; for example, multicultural curriculum, techniques to foster sense of community, selecting a preschool, handling behavior problems, working with parents, etc. Transfer credit: CSU.

ECE. 665SK SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING FUNDAMENTALS (SELF) - PART I (1.0)

This two-part course, offered during Fall and Spring semesters, will support early childhood educators in better defining, understanding, preventing and planning for challenging behaviors. The main areas of focus will be on defining challenging behavior, learning why children misbehave, exploring prevention and intervention strategies, and following a child through the behavioral planning process with use of real classroom footage. Transfer: CSU.

ECE. 665SL SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING FUNDAMENTALS (SELF) - PART II (1.0)

This two-part course, offered during Fall and Spring semesters, will support early childhood educators in better defining, understanding, preventing and planning for challenging behaviors. The main areas of focus will be on defining challenging behavior, learning why children misbehave, exploring prevention and intervention strategies, and following a child through the behavioral planning process with use of real classroom footage. Transfer: CSU.


ECE. 804 ENGLISH FOR CHILDCARE PROVIDERS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ESOL 830, or ESOL 863 and ESOL 873, or eligibility for ESOL 840, or equivalent.
Basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in standard English within the context of child care. Intended for parents, grandparents, child care providers, and preschool teachers who are learning English as a second language. Also listed as ESOL 804. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ECON 100 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Introduction to the U.S. economy and its institutions in a global context. Measuring output, unemployment, and inflation. Theory of the determination of output and prices for individual markets and the economy as a whole. Analysis of money, banking, and interest rates. Government fiscal and monetary stabilization policies. Current economic topics.  Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


ECON 102 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: ECON 100 or equivalent; and MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Introduction to the functioning of markets. Theory of the determination of output and prices for markets under competitive and noncompetitive conditions. Analysis of firms' costs and revenues. Government tax and regulatory policies in response to imperfect competition and market failures. Current economic topics such as international trade and labor markets. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

ECON 111 THE ECONOMY TODAY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
@9/11.5:Non-theoretical consideration of current economic issues. Introduction to basic economic concepts and alternative perspectives. Current issues include unemployment, inflation, banking, immigration, social security, international trade, and war. NOTE: Students who have received credit for ECON 100 or 102 may not receive credit for ECON 111. Transfer credit: CSU (D3).


ECON 310 POLITICAL ECONOMY OF ASIA (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100, or equivalent.
A comparative study of the political economy of Asian countries. European and U.S. colonialism, post-colonial political and economic developments, and market reforms in socialist countries. Relations among Asian nations and their relationship to the U.S. economy and foreign policy. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

EDUC 100 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

Survey of the American education system including review of the development of schools, assessment of issues facing schools, the profession, and society, and an opportunity for students to decide the career potential of education. Transfer credit: CSU (D3.)

EDUC 120 HISTORICAL, SOCIO-CULTURAL, AND PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (3.0) Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 20 hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent. Explores historical, socio-cultural, and phiilosophical aspects of American education with a specific focus on schooling. Intended for those interested in becoming teachers/professional educationrs. Transfer credit: CSU.


EDUC 200 INTRODUCTION TO CLASSROOM TEACHING (3)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 fieldwork hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A survey of the teaching profession including: pedagogical methods; theories of learning; planning, delivering and assessing instruction; classroom management, professional and ethical considerations; diversity; and standards for the teaching profession. A total of 48 hours of fieldwork in schools is required. Transfer credit: CSU.


ELEC 110 FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRONICS (4)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester.
Activity-based introduction to the fundamentals of DC and AC electrical/electronic circuits. Course covers the basic mathematical laws, terminologies, testing and measuring of simple circuits. Laboratory exercises will emphasize the use of tools, electrical test instruments and measuring devices. Transfer credit: CSU.

ELEC 410 INTRODUCTION TO SOLAR INSTALLATION AND INTEGRATION (3.5)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 24 lab hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Completion of , or concurrent enrollment in, ELEC 110, or equivalent.
An introductory course targeted to junior-level photovoltaic installers to provide a foundation of skills necessary in solar installation. Topics include electrical theory and practice, photovoltaic theory and integration, and solar installation skills. The course is a balance of theory, hands-on practice and real world examples. Also listed as ESTM 410. Transfer credit: CSU.


EMC. 180 GATEWAY TO HEALTH CAREERS (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.
Introduction of skills, attributes and basic knowledge required for entry into various health care professions. Includes basic assessment, CPR, and math calculations used in health care. Emphasis on providing a foundation for future health career courses. Transfer credit: CSU.


EMC. 400 EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONDER (2.5)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 24 lab hours/semester.
Develops manipulative and problem solving skills necessary for the initial evaluation and stabilization of victims of emergency illness or trauma. First responder-level training for fire service, emergency, law enforcement, civil, and industrial personnel. Upon completion, student receives a CPR for Healthcare Provider card, a Skyline College course completion certificate and is eligible for the National Registry Emergency Medical Responder written examination.


EMC. 410 EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (8)
Minimum of 96 lecture hours and 96 lab hours, plus 20 hours by arrangement (which will include a minimum of 8 hours in a local Emergency Department and 12 hours riding with a local ambulance company)/semester. Prerequisite: Completion of EMC. 425 or a valid Healthcare Provider CPR card.

This course represents the first phase of training in the Emergency Medical Technician Career Structure. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the Emergency Medical Technician, as well as all operational aspects of the job the EMT will be expected to perform. Meets National EMS Education Standards and 2010 AHA guidelines.

EMC. 415 EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN I - REFRESHER (1.5-2)
Minimum of 24 or 32 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: California EMT I certificate that is current or has not been expired for more than four years.
A three or four day course that provides EMT’s with the opportunity to renew their EMT I certificate. The three-day course provides 24 hours of Continuing Education Units. The four-day course provides the necessary written and skills testing.

EMC. 425 CPR: HEALTH CARE PROVIDER (.5)
(Pass/No Pass.)
Minimum of 8 lecture hours/semester.
This course will qualify students for CPR certification for health care providers. Includes instruction pertinent to adult, child and infant CPR. Transfer credit: CSU.


EMC. 665 SELECTED TOPICS IN EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)
Minimum of 8 lecture hours per .5 unit.
This course is designed to review and update specific topics fundamental to the practice of an Emergency Medical Technician or paramedic. Some of these topics may be taken for continuing education units.


ENGL 100 COMPOSITION (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. WRITING PREREQUISITE: ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or eligibility for ENGL 100 on approved college placement tests and other measures as necessary. READING PREREQUISITE: READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or eligibility for 400-level Reading courses on approved college reading placement test, and other measures as necessary.
Designed to help the student recognize and critically evaluate important ideas in short and book length texts, and express facts and thought logically and gracefully in clear and correct prose. Students will write critical expository essays dealing with a variety of ideas at a skill level appropriate to a transfer level college course. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (A2, A3).

ENGL 103 APPLIED ENGLISH SKILLS FOR CULTURAL PRODUCTION I (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Designed for students who want to develop critical thinking skills in the writing of a Pilipino Cultural Night (PCN) and will focus on writing the script for PCN. Students will research other PCN’s, read and evaluate cultural literary texts related to the theme for content and composition, and work collaboratively to write a script to celebrate the Filipino and Filipino American experience. Transfer credit: CSU.

ENGL 104 APPLIED ENGLISH SKILLS FOR CULTURAL PRODUCTION II (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Designed for students who want to develop critical thinking skills in the production of a Pilipino Cultural Night (PCN) and will focus on the creation of a PCN, including producing, advertising, acting, singing, dancing, stage/technical crew, and prop/set design and construction. Rehearsal times will be arranged by the instructor. All students will be required to participate in and work collaboratively for the PCN performances at the end of the semester. Transfer credit: CSU.

ENGL 110 COMPOSITION, LITERATURE AND CRITICAL THINKING (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Course is designed to introduce students to the major imaginative genres of poetry, drama, and fiction from diverse cultural sources and literary critical perspectives.. Students will write analytical essays, employing methods of literary analysis and demonstrating critical thinking skills appropriate to a college-level writing class. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (A2, A3, C2).

ENGL 161, 162 CREATIVE WRITING I AND II (3, 3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 161: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent. ENGL 162: Completion of ENGL 161.

The craft of writing short stories, sketches, poetry, short dramas, and other literary forms for both personal enjoyment and professional training. During the Spring Semester, class members may volunteer to work on the college’s literary magazine. Transfer credit: ENGL 161 – UC; CSU (C2); ENGL 162 – UC; CSU.

ENGL 161, 162 CREATIVE WRITING I AND II (3, 3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 161: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent. ENGL 162: Completion of ENGL 161.

The craft of writing short stories, sketches, poetry, short dramas, and other literary forms for both personal enjoyment and professional training. During the Spring Semester, class members may volunteer to work on the college’s literary magazine. Transfer credit: ENGL 161 – UC; CSU (C2); ENGL 162 – UC; CSU.

ENGL 165 CRITICAL THINKING AND ADVANCED COMPOSITION (3)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or ENGL 105 with grade of C or better.

Through investigative learning in conjunction with nonfiction prose, students will explore multiple points of view on controversial issues, using critical thinking, reading and writing skills to discuss and manipulate ideas in a progression of argumentative essays more advanced than English 100. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (A3)

ENGL 166 WOMEN ON WRITING (.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A total of eight lecture hours.

Exploration of diverse women's experience as portrayed in a variety of genres. Students will read, hear from and discuss women authors who write in such modes as the novel, short story, poetry, drama, film, news reporting and editorial comment, memoir, biography, and historical fiction. Course participants will examine and celebrate women's voices in contemporary writing. Also listed as LIT. 166. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 3 units. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


ENGL 203 APPLIED ENGLISH SKILLS FOR CULTURAL PRODUCTION III (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Designed for students who want to develop advanced critical thinking skills in the writing of a Pilipino Cultural Night (PCN) and will primarily focus on developing the management roles of the production. Students will research other PCN’s, read and evaluate cultural literary texts related to the theme for content and composition, and work collaboratively to write a script to celebrate the Filipino and Filipino American experience. In addition, these students will be meeting outside of class time to develop and advance their leadership skills in preparation for the upcoming Pilipino Cultural Night performances. Transfer credit: CSU.


ENGL 204 APPLIED ENGLISH SKILLS FOR CULTURAL PRODUCTION IV (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Designed for students who want to develop advanced critical thinking skills in the production of a Pilipino Cultural Night (PCN) by serving in the management roles of the production. Course will focus on the creation of a PCN, including producing, advertising, acting, singing, dancing, stage/technical crew, and prop/set design and construction. Rehearsal times will be arranged by the instructor. All students will be required to participate in and work collaboratively for the PCN performances at the end of the semester. In addition, the students enrolled in this course will be meeting outside of class time to demonstrate and further develop and advance their leadership skills in preparation for the upcoming Pilipino Cultural Night performances. Transfer credit: CSU.


ENGL 650 ENGLISH SUPPLEMENT FOR TRIO STUDENTS (.5-3)
(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24 lab hours by arrangement for each .5 unit.
Individual instruction in reading and writing skills for TRIO/STAARS students based on TRIO English instructor’s assessment of each student’s reading and writing skills. Students are assigned a personal tutor/mentor based in The Learning Center. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 655 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE SUPPLEMENT (.5-3)
(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24 lab hours by arrangement for each .5 unit. Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in an ESOL course.
Provides assistance for ESL students in communication skills, including reading, writing, listening and speaking. The lab allows students to drop in and follow self-paced curriculum, or to choose the instructional methods they prefer: one-on-one tutoring, software, English practice groups, faculty-taught workshops, or phone-in/online tutoring when available. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

ENGL 680SA WRITING ESSAYS IN THE DISCIPLINES (0.5) Pass/No Pass Prepares students to write more effectively in classes across the disciplines. The course reviews basic writing, then focuses on writing in specific courses. May be repeated a maximum of three times for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.


ENGL 819 ENGLISH DEVELOPMENT (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.
This course prepares students to read and write at the college level. Practice and instruction focus on reading college-level texts and writing college-level, text-based essays. Topics include thesis construction, organization, development, and sentence skills. Students will complete in-class and outside writing assignments, application in digital video production, individual conferences, and tutoring. Note: This course does not replace any course in Skyline College’s required course sequence based on placement testing. (Units do not apply to the Associate Degree.)

ENGL 826 BASIC WRITING SKILLS (3)

Five lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for READ 826 and ENGL 826 by appropriate scores on college placement tests and other measures as necessary. Students placing in READ 826 and ENGL 826 should enroll in both courses concurrently.

A course in basic writing focusing on paragraph and essay organization, sentence skills, and text-based writing. Students will write essays in and out of class and complete assignments to strengthen sentence skills and writing/reading strategies. ENGL 826 prepares students for ENGL 836. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ENGL 828 BASIC COMPOSITION AND READING (5)

Minimum of 80 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 826 and READ 826 by appropriate scores on college placement tests and other measures as necessary.
Practice in composition and reading based on the study of essays and other reading material. Composition of short essays, with focused work on reading, paragraph development, and sentence structure.  (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

ENGL 836 WRITING DEVELOPMENT (3)

Three lecture hours per week. WRITING PREREQUISITE: Completion of ENGL 826 or ESOL 840 or 841/842 with a grade of C or better, or appropriate scores on approved college placement test and other measures as necessary. READING PREREQUISITE: READ 826 with Credit or a grade of C or better, or eligibility for READ 836 on approved college reading placement test, or other measures as necessary.

An introduction to college composition that prepares students to write essays at the college level, focusing on thesis construction, organization, development, sentence skills, reading, and text-based writing. Students will be assigned in-class and outside writing assignments and exercises, as well as attend individual conferences, and tutoring. ENGL 836 prepares students for ENGL 100/105.


ENGL 846 READING AND WRITING CONNECTIONS (5)

Minimum of 80 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: Eligibility for, or completion of, ENGL 828; or eligibility for ENGL 846 on approved college placement test or multiple measures, or equivalent.
Introduces students to college-level reading and writing, covering thesis construction, organization, development, sentence skills, text-based writing, and effective reading strategies to improve comprehension, analysis and vocabulary. ENGL 846 prepares students for ENGL 100.

ENGL 875 ENGLISH GRAMMAR (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week.

Review of English grammar with emphasis on practicing standard English skills and correctness for use in academic papers. Appropriate for all levels of English. May be repeated once for credit. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

ENVS 100 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An interdisciplinary introduction to aspects of environmental and natural resource issues and their impact on human welfare. Exploration of causes of environmental issues in a natural sciences, social sciences, business and engineering context. Study of sustainability and potential solutions to environmental problems. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B2).

ENVS 410 INTRODUCTION TO SOLAR INSTALLATION AND INTEGRATION Recommended: Completion of ELEC 110 with a grade of C or better, or concurrent enrollment in ELEC 110, or equivalent. An introductory course targeted to junior-level photovoltaic installers to provide a foundation of skills necessary in solar installation. Topics include electrical theory and practice, photovoltaic theory and integration, and solar installation skills. The course is a balance of theory, hands-on practice, and real world examples. Plus a total of 16 lab hours by arrangement. Also listed as ELEC 410. Transfer: CSU.
ENVS 425 BUILDING PERFORMANCE, ASSESSMENT, AND SALES (4)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: ENVS 680SF (Principles of Building Science, Energy and Construction); and eligibility for MATH 110 or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Provides a foundation to conduct home energy audits and sell home energy upgrade products and services. Topics include fundamental building science concepts, best practices for auditing and data analysis, BPI standards and the Title 24 energy code. Prepares students for the Building Performance Institute certification exam. Transfer credit: CSU.

ENVS 665SA SOLAR SYSTEMS FOR THE CONSUMER Make the move to renewable solar energy. Class covers basic principles of photovoltaics and solar thermal, rebates, and discusses individual energy savings. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer: CSU.
ENVS 665SB CAREERS IN GREEN AND SUSTAINABLE INDUSTRIES Join the new green workforce. Green careers are not limited to those in alternative energy. Career choices include sales, finance, sustainable farming, wildlife restoration, and so much more. Find out how to green your present career. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer: CSU.
ENVS 665SC INTRODUCTION TO CLEAN ENERGY CONCEPTS Explore basic environmental issues including global warming and climate change. Introduction to renewable energy and energy efficiency with an emphasis on alternative energy. Transfer: CSU.
ENVS 665SD ENVIRONMENTAL AND CLEAN ENERGY LITERACY Explore basic environmental issues and justice, clean energy concepts, and green jobs. Transfer: CSU.
ENVS 665SE ENERGY EFFICIENCY FOR REALTORS AND MORTGAGE PROFESSIONALS Content includes the fundamentals of energy efficiency in existing homes, how to finance whole house upgrades and renewables, using the Green MLS, and how to profit from the green housing paradigm. Also listed as R.E. 665SE. Transfer: CSU.
ENVS 680SA SOLAR DESIGN, ESTIMATION AND SALES Provides a foundation of skills to understand and sell basic solar installation systems. Basic course content includes fundamental economic principles and incentive programs related to solar systems, design of PV and solar thermal systems, sizing and cost estimation of solar systems, and fundamental customer service and marketing practices. Transfer: CSU.
ENVS 680SB BUILDING PERFORMANCE, ASSESSMENT AND SALES Provides a foundation to conduct home energy audits and sell home energy upgrade products and services. Topics include fundamental building science concepts, best practices for auditing and data analysis, BPI standards, and the Title 24 energy code. The course prepares students for Building Performance Institute (BPI) certification. Transfer credit: CSU.
ENVS 680SC EFFECTIVE GREEN BUSINESS MARKETING Provides foundation of knowledge and skills to acquire customers and market for green businesses, emphasizing the construction industry. Topics include branding strategy, customer relationship management, marketing techniques and tools, and best practices for business development. Each week, students will apply marketing techniques to real-world businesses and case studies. Transfer credit: CSU.
ENVS 680SD ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICE LEARNING (2)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester.

A community-based approach to Environmental Science. Core concepts of sustainability and civic responsibility are emphasized through independent volunteer projects coupled with in-class lecture, weekly peer learning, discussions, reflections, and presentations. Transfer credit: CSU.

ENVS 680SE GREEN BUSINESS MARKETING STRATEGY AND TOOLS (2) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) A minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent. Provides foundation of knowledge and skills to acquire customers and market for green businesses, emphasizing the construction industry. Topics include branding strategy, customer relationship management, marketing techniques and tools, and best practices for business development. Each week, students will apply marketing techniques to real-world businesses and case studies. Transfer credit: CSU.
ENVS 680SF PRINCIPLES OF BUILDING SCIENCE, ENERGY AND CONSTRUCTION (3.0) Overview residential built environment, building science and whole building construction terminology and practices, and energy markets/policy. Emphasis on California, energy efficiency and water conservation. Transfer: CSU.
ENVS 680SG FUNDAMENTALS OF HOME PERFORMANCE BUSINESS PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent. Overview of key productivity drivers necessary to create and sustain a new business or transition an existing business to energy efficiency and renewable energy products and services. Tools to identify and grow construction businesses by leveraging in-house and government and utility resources. Business planning, managing marketing, sales, service, and operations. Transfer credit: CSU.
ENVS 680SH BUILDING PERFORMANCE RETROFITTING (4.0) (Pass?No Pass or letter grade.) A minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: ENVS 425 with a minimum grade of C or Pass, ENVS 680SF with a minimum grade of C or Pass; and eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and eligibility for MATH 110. Provides a foundation to perform “whole-house” retrofits for energy/water efficiency. Students apply theory to conduct hands-on retrofitting. Topics include building science, energy assessment reports, developing work scope, HVAC and envelope upgrades, air leakage and sealing, insulation installation, moisture remediation, quality control. Preparation for Building Performance Institute certification exam. Transfer credit: CSU.
ENVS 680SI INTRODUCTION TO SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAICS (PV) SYSTEMS, DESIGN AND FINANCE (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent.

Provides a foundation of knowledge and skills to understand the solar photovoltaics market and technology. Includes introduction to the global solar PV market, fundamentals of electricity and PV technology, introduction to incentive programs related to solar systems and fundamentals of the site survey process for a residential solar PV array. Transfer credit: CSU.

ENVS 680SJ SOLAR THERMAL (WATER HEATING) FUNDAMENTALS (.5)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent.

An overview of industry standards and best practices for residential and commercial solar hot water heating. Topics include industry overview and policy incentives; identifying collectors, components, and system types; performing financial analysis for cost savings; practices in selecting equipment and components, siting, designing, constructing, and installing systems. Transfer credit: CSU.

ENVS 680SL NABCEP ENTRY-LEVEL SOLAR INDUSTRY TEST PREPARATION (.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ENVS 680SI, or equivalent.

Review and test preparation for Entry-Level North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP) exam. Topics include PV Markets and Applications, Safety, Electricity Basics, Solar Energy Fundamentals, PV Module Fundamentals, System Components, PV System Sizing Principles, PV System Electrical Design, PV System Mechanical Design, Performance Analysis, Maintenance and Troubleshooting. Transfer credit: CSU.

ENVS 680SM FIELD TRAINING AND CREDENTIAL EXAM PREPARATION FOR HOME PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT (.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester. Recommended: ENVS 425, or equivalent.

Hands-on, advanced field training course builds on fundamental knowledge, skills, and abilities for conducting home performance energy efficiency assessments. Students hone best practices for building systems assessment and data analysis, and producing technical reports with energy upgrade recommendations. Advanced preparation for Building Performance Institute (BPI) field certification exam. Transfer credit: CSU.

ENVS 680SN CLIMATE PROTECTION PROFESSIONAL I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ENVS 100 or ESTM 400, or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent.

Foundation for emerging leaders working in climate change mitigation and adaptation fields. Overview of climate change science (the greenhouse effect, emissions factors, and sources), current climate protection policies in California, including emerging regulations, and analytic tools, including mitigation and adaptation inventories and action plans. Includes professional training in project management, workplace effectiveness, communication, and fundraising. Transfer credit: CSU.

ENVS 680SO CLIMATE PROTECTION PROFESSIONAL II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of ENVS/ESTM 680SN.

Expansion on fundamentals of climate change concepts: science and expected impacts; mitigation and adaptation strategies; metrics for analyzing current impacts, forecasts and results from solution scenarios. Expansion of project management practices, career pathways, leadership, and career development skills, within the context of client site projects in preparation for final report and/or presentation. Transfer credit: CSU.


ESOL 400 ENGLISH COMPOSITION FOR NONNATIVE SPEAKERS (5)

Minimum of 80 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: ESOL 840, or ESOL 864 and 874, or equivalent; or appropriate skill level as indicated by ESL placement test and other measures as necessary.
For advanced nonnative speakers of English who have completed ESOL 840, or 841 and 842, or 864 and 874, or equivalent, but need more intensive work in critical reading and composition before attempting ENGL 100. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


ESOL 655 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE SUPPLEMENT (.5-3)
(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24 lab hours by arrangement for each .5 unit. Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in an ESOL course.
Provides assistance for ESL students in communication skills, including reading, writing, listening and speaking. The lab allows students to drop in and follow self-paced curriculum, or to choose the instructional methods they prefer: one-on-one tutoring, software, English practice groups, faculty-taught workshops, or phone-in/online tutoring when available. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 801 BASIC CONVERSATIONAL ENGLISH (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL placement test.
A practical course in the English language approached by way of conversation. Intensive drill in the patterns and idioms of daily speech in standard spoken English with sufficient grammar to give flexibility to the spoken language. Introduction to American culture. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 802 PRE-INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATIONAL ENGLISH (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL 851 or equivalent.
A practical course in the English language approached by way of conversation. Intensive drill in the patterns and idioms of daily speech in standard spoken English with sufficient grammar to give flexibility to the spoken language. Continued analysis and exposure to American culture. Appropriate for pre-intermediate speakers of English eligible for ESOL 852, or equivalent. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 803 WORKPLACE ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 32 hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: ESOL 851 or equivalent.
Professional greetings, dress and customs, conversation, customer service, and other skills to work successfully in an office environment. Practice in staffing a professional office. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 804 ENGLISH FOR CHILDCARE PROVIDERS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ESOL 830, or ESOL 863 and ESOL 873, or eligibility for ESOL 840, or equivalent.
Basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in standard English within the context of child care. Intended for parents, grandparents, child care providers, and preschool teachers who are learning English as a second language. Also listed as ECE. 804. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 805 ENGLISH FOR HEALTH CARE I: PATIENTS AND HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL 840, or eligibility for ESOL 400, or appropriate skill level as indicated by ESL placement test and other measures as necessary, or equivalent.
Designed for health care professionals in all health fields with high-intermediate English language proficiency. Integrated language skills on themes such as career options and requirements in health care, patient-centered communication, interaction patterns on health care teams, assertive communication, health care systems and traditions, and cultural diversity in health care. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 806 ENGLIGH FOR HEALTH CARE II: HEALTH CARE PRACTICES (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL 840, or eligibility for ESOL 400, or appropriate skill level as indicated by ESL placement test and other measures as necessary, or equivalent.
Designed for health care professionals in all health fields with intermediate English language proficiency. Integrated language skills on themes such as interviews in health care, interaction patterns on health care teams, discussion of treatment options with patients, alternative health perspectives, and communication strategies among culturally diverse patients and health workers. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 807 ENGLISH FOR HEALTH CARE III: CHALLENGES IN HEALTH CARE (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL 840, or eligibility for ESOL 400, or appropriate skill level as indicated by ESL placement test and other measures as necessary, or equivalent.
Designed for health care professionals in all health fields with high-intermediate English language proficiency. Integrated language skills on themes such as professional behavior and development, supervisory and collegial challenges, safety issues, special needs patients, telephone and electronic communication, underserved communities, and legal and ethical issues in health care. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 830 ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES III (6)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 144 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Satisfactory completion of ESOL 862 and ESOL 872, or appropriate skill level as indicated by ESL placement test and other measures as necessary.
For intermediate students who have studied the grammatical structures in ESOL 820, or 821 and 822, or 862 and 872, or equivalent, and have acquired conversational fluency and basic reading and writing skills. Emphasis is on critical reading, sentence combining, oral exchange, and paragraph writing. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

ESOL 840 ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES IV (6)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Nine lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Recommended: Satisfactory completion of ESOL 830, or 831 and 832, or 863 and 873, or appropriate skill level as indicated by ESL placement test and other measures as necessary.

For high-intermediate students who have studied the grammatical structures, reading skills, and elements of paragraph writing in ESOL 830, or 831 and 832, or 863 and 873, or equivalent. Emphasis is on thematic reading, discussion, and writing from paragraphs to essays, supplemented by exercises in proofreading. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

ESOL 851 HIGH-BEGINNNG ESL LISTENING AND SPEAKING (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL placement test.
Development of listening comprehension and oral proficiency of standard spoken English at the high-beginning level. Listening focuses on comprehension of verbal instructions, vocabulary in context, and ideas in sentences, speeches, and dialogues. Speaking focuses on clear pronunciation of common words and phrases and development of fluency in conversation. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 852 PRE-INTERMEDIATE ESL LISTENING AND SPEAKING (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL 851 or equivalent.
Development of listening comprehension and oral proficiency of standard spoken English at the pre-intermediate level. Listening focuses on comprehension of modified spoken English, vocabulary in context, and ideas in speeches and discussions. Speaking focuses on clear pronunciation of common words and phrases, continued development of fluency in conversation, and proficiency in initiating, sustaining, and ending oral communication in a variety of contexts. ESOL 852, when taken with ESOL 862 and ESOL 872, is equivalent to ESOL 820. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 853 INTERMEDIATE ESL LISTENING AND SPEAKING (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL 852 or equivalent.
Development of listening comprehension and oral proficiency of standard spoken English at the intermediate level. Listening focuses on note-taking and aural comprehension of standard spoken English using information from media, discussion, and academic contexts. Speaking focuses on English fluency, proficiency, and strategies for discussion and personal interaction. ESOL 853, when taken with ESOL 863 and ESOL 873, is equivalent to ESOL 830. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 854 HIGH-INTERMEDIATE ESL LISTENING AND SPEAKING (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL 853, or appropriate skill level as indicated by ESL placement test and other measures as necessary.
Development of listening comprehension and oral proficiency of standard spoken English at the high-intermediate level. Listening focuses on note-taking and aural comprehension of standard spoken English in academic situations, media, and discussion. Speaking focuses on fluency of English speech, proficiency in clarifying and restating, and strategies for facilitating discussion. ESOL 854, when taken with ESOL 864 and ESOL 874, is equivalent to ESOL 840. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 861 HIGH-BEGINNING ESL READING AND WRITING (4)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 64 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL placement test.
Development of reading and writing skills at the high-beginning level of English acquisition. Reading strategies, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and sentence and short paragraph writing. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 862 PRE-INTERMEDIATE ESL READING AND WRITING (4)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 64 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL 861 and ESOL 871, or equivalent.
Development of reading and writing skills at the pre-intermediate level of English acquisition. Reading strategies, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and short paragraph writing. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 863 INTERMEDIATE ESL READING AND WRITING (4)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 64 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL 862 and ESOL 872, or equivalent.
@9/11.5:Development of reading and writing skills at the intermediate level of English acquisition. Reading strategies, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and paragraph writing. ESOL 863, when taken with ESOL 853 and ESOL 873, is equivalent to ESOL 830. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 864 HIGH-INTERMEDIATE ESL READING AND WRITING (4)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 64 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL 863 or equivalent.
Development of reading and writing skills at the high-intermediate level of English acquisition. Reading strategies, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, paragraph and essay writing. ESOL 864, when taken with ESOL 854 and ESOL 874, is equivalent to ESOL 840. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 871 HIGH-BEGINNING ESL GRAMMAR (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Appropriate skill level as indicated by ESL placement test and other measures as necessary.
Development of sentence variety and grammatical and mechanical accuracy of standard spoken and written English at the high-beginning level. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 872 PRE-INTERMEDIATE ESL GRAMMAR (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL 871, or appropriate skill level as indicated by ESL placement test and other measures as necessary, or equivalent.
Development of sentence variety and grammatical and mechanical accuracy of standard spoken and written English at the pre-intermediate level. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

ESOL 873 INTERMEDIATE ESL GRAMMAR (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL 872 or equivalent.
Development of sentence variety and grammatical and mechanical accuracy of standard spoken and written English at the intermediate level. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 874 HIGH-INTERMEDIATE ESL GRAMMAR (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL 830 or ESOL 873, or equivalent.
Development of sentence variety and grammatical and mechanical accuracy of standard spoken and written English at the high-intermediate level. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESOL 875 ADVANCED ESL GRAMMAR AND EDITING (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ESOL 840 or ESOL 874, or appropriate skill level as indicated by ESL placement test and other measures as necessary, or equivalent.
Non-native English speaking students will review complex grammar and language structures applicable to academic writing, as well as strategies for editing their own writing. This course assumes advanced study of English as a Second Language and the ability to read, write, and use English language structures appropriate to the level of ESOL 400. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


ESTM 400 CLEAN ENERGY CONCEPTS, POLICIES AND INDUSTRIES (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Fundamental energy and sustainability concepts in the regional, state, and federal context including: climate change; greenhouse gas emissions calculation and management; historical, current, and emerging policies and regulations for greenhouse gas and energy generation and use, including economic impacts; alternative energy technology; industry practices and careers across energy and construction sectors. Transfer credit: CSU.

ESTM 402 INTRODUCTION TO RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or BUS. 115, or equivalent; and ESTM 400 or equivalent.
Fundamental residential construction concepts, terminology, and practices, including framing, HVAC, insulation, electrical, plumbing, materials, and hands-on construction basics. Emphasis on green and sustainable building practices and renovations. Main issues in California and Bay Area codes and historical building trends regarding energy and environmental standards. Transfer credit: CSU.

ESTM 410 INTRODUCTION TO SOLAR INSTALLATION AND INTEGRATION (3.5)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 24 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ELEC 110, or equivalent.
An introductory course targeted to junior-level photovoltaic installers to provide a foundation of skills necessary in solar installation. Topics include electrical theory and practice, photovoltaic theory and integration, and solar installation skills. The course is a balance of theory, hands-on practice, and real world examples. Also listed as ELEC 410. Transfer credit: CSU.

ESTM 411 INTRODUCTION TO SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAICS (PV) SYSTEMS AND MARKETS (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or BUS. 115, or equivalent; and ESTM 400 or equivalent.
Provides a foundation of knowledge and skills to understand the solar photovoltaics market and technology. Includes introduction to the global solar PV market, fundamentals of electricity and PV technology, introduction to incentive programs related to solar systems and fundamentals of the site survey process for a residential solar PV array. Transfer credit: CSU.

ESTM 412 SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAICS (PV) DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or BUS. 115, or equivalent; and ESTM 400, ESTM 410 or ESTM 411, or equivalent.
Foundation of knowledge and skills to understand the site survey and to translate survey data into estimation and design of solar photovoltaics systems. Includes detailed methodology for site surveys, shade analysis, system sizing, string and inverter sizing, the use of software system design tools, graphical PV system design aids. Transfer credit: CSU.

ESTM 413 SOLAR PHOTOVOTAICS (PV) FINANCE AND SALES (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or BUS. 115, or equivalent; and ESTM 400, ESTM 410, ESTM 411 or ESTM 412, or equivalent.
Economics and sales methodologies for residential solar PV energy systems. Methods and analysis of financing and investment for solar PV systems, including incentive programs and utility tariffs. Customer service and presentation skills and sales best practices. Focus on student’s marketability in the renewable energy job marketplace. Transfer credit: CSU.

ESTM 421 PRINCIPLES OF BUILDING SCIENCE, HOW HOUSES WORK (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or BUS. 115, or equivalent; and ESTM 400 or equivalent.
Exploration of how air flow, heat flow and moisture flow affect the health, comfort, durability and energy efficiency of the building. Students learn to identify, classify, and compare residential building components, systems, materials and understand and explain sustainable building practices and building science fundamentals. Transfer credit: CSU.


ESTM 425 BUILDING PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT (4)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or BUS. 115, or equivalent; and ESTM 400, ESTM 402 or ESTM 421, or equivalent.
Provides a foundation to conduct home energy audits and sell home energy upgrade products and services. Topics include fundamental building science concepts, best practices for auditing and data analysis, BPI standards and the Title 24 energy code. Prepares students for the Building Performance Institute certification exam. Transfer credit: CSU.


ESTM 426 BUILDING PERFORMANCE RETROFITTING (4)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or BUS. 115, or equivalent; and ESTM 400, ESTM 402, ESTM 421, ESTM 425 or ESTM 427, or equivalent.
Provides a foundation to perform “whole-house” retrofits for energy/water efficiency. Students apply theory to conduct hands-on retrofitting. Topics include building science, energy assessment reports, developing work scope, HVAC and envelope upgrades, air leakage and sealing, insulation installation, moisture remediation, and quality control. Preparation for Building Performance Institute certification exam. Transfer credit: CSU.


ESTM 427 INTRODUCTION TO WHOLE HOME HEATING, VENTILATION, AND COOLING (HVAC) (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or BUS. 115, or equivalent; and ESTM 400, ESTM 402 or ESTM 421, or equivalent.
Overview of equipment, design, operation of residential heating, ventilation, and cooling systems. Appliance nameplates are decoded and the role of ducts and registers is explored. Students learn to use industry software to size equipment and ducts and design a simple space-conditioning system. Major challenges to energy use in new and existing systems. Transfer credit: CSU.


ESTM 428 FIELD TRAINING AND EXAM PREPERATION FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY (.5)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester. Recommended: ESTM 425 or equivalent.
Hands-on, advanced field training course builds on fundamental knowledge, skills, and abilities for conducting home performance energy efficiency assessments. Students hone best practices for building systems assessment and data analysis, and producing technical reports with energy upgrade recommendations. Advanced preparation for Building Performance Institute (BPI) field certification exam. Transfer credit: CSU.


ESTM 441 SOLAR THERMAL TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or BUS. 115, or equivalent; and ESTM 400, ESTM 410 or ESTM 411, or equivalent.
Introduction to technology, concepts, and methods of sizing and designing solar hot water systems. Includes site survey, load analysis, rebates and permitting issues, and safety. Methods for identifying and selecting appropriate thermal systems, installation and operation practices, and use of balance-of-system components. Emphasis on student’s marketability in the renewable energy job marketplace. Transfer credit: CSU.

ESTM 445 COMMERCIAL SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAICS (PV) FINANCE AND SALES (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or BUS. 115, or equivalent; and ESTM 410, ESTM 411, ESTM 412 or ESTM 413, or equivalent.Recommended: ESTM 400 or equivalent.
Advanced training in sales, finance, policy, and technology for commercial, institutional, and utility-scale PV solar installations. Includes best practices for sales and bidding, proposal analysis, finance options, incentives analysis, and case studies in project approval and development. Transfer credit: CSU



ESTM 490 CAPSTONE PROJECT IN ENERGY SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT (1.5-3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 8-16 lecture hours/semester and 30-120 work experience hours/semester. Prerequisite:At least 10 units of ESTM coursework, or equivalent.
Seminar format course emphasizing fieldwork, case study project, internship, or other advanced, special topic. Focus on completing a portfolio piece for a client or employer, demonstrating breadth and depth of knowledge in ESTM, taken as one of the final courses in the certificate or degree program. Transfer credit: CSU.

ESTM 680SA ENERGY SUMMER CAMP (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Introduces high school students to topics in energy efficiency, renewable energy, and basics of business management for the built environment and sustainability. Modules include energy efficiency and solar project assessment and proposals, installation techniques, entrepreneurship, business communications, and marketing/sales strategy. Survey of careers and companies. Preparation for science, technology, and business students. Transfer credit: CSU.

b>ESTM 680SN CLIMATE PROTECTION PROFESSIONAL I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ENVS 100 or ESTM 400, or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent; and completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent.

Foundation for emerging leaders working in climate change mitigation and adaptation fields. Overview of climate change science (the greenhouse effect, emissions factors, and sources), current climate protection policies in California, including emerging regulations, and analytic tools, including mitigation and adaptation inventories and action plans. Includes professional training in project management, workplace effectiveness, communication, and fundraising. Transfer credit: CSU.


FASH 100 PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An overview of design principles and elements used in fashion to create effective and successful garment designs. Focus is on the recognition, analysis and evaluation of good design in both ready to wear and student's original designs. Other topics include sketching and presentation techniques. Transfer credit: CSU.


FASH 113 TEXTILES (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Study of natural and chemical fibers; yarns and cloth construction, weaving, finishing, dyeing. Study of purchase, use and care of textiles. Federal legislation, cost and labeling as related to consumer use. Student will examine the various characteristics of fibers and fabrics, including health and comfort level on the body. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

FASH 117 CREATING A PERSONAL IMAGE (3)

Three lecture hours per week.

A course designed to aid the student in adapting a fashion appearance appropriate for professional and personal care. Concepts in awareness of personal coloring, figure considerations, hair styling, and use of makeup. Wardrobe planning and selection, accessorizing, and shopping strategies will be emphasized. Specific material for both men and women will be presented. Also listed as FCS 117. Transfer credit: CSU.


FASH 119 CLOTHING, CULTURE AND SOCIETY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Study of bodily adornment in terms of cultural, ethnic, historical, sociological, psychological and economic considerations. Comparison will be made of various cultures and subcultures. Fashion trends and merchandising techniques as they affect the consumer will also be discussed. Student will examine the importance of clothing as an expression of individual and group identity. Transfer credit: CSU (C1).


FASH 151 FASHION MERCHANDISING (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Through lectures, guest speakers and field trips the student will have the opportunity to explore a variety of aspects of the ready-to-wear and couture industry. Production cost, promotion and advertising techniques will be studied in relation to large and small manufacture and retail operations. Personal requirements to help prepare students for employment in the field of fashion merchandising are given for guidance value. Transfer credit: CSU.

FASH 152 VISUAL MERCHANDISING (3)

Three lecture hours per week.

Designed to provide the basic techniques needed for the visual presentation of merchandise. The student will be involved in the study of interior displays, the art of dramatizing the display, store windows, and their coordination with sales promotion. (Fall Semester only.) Transfer credit: CSU.

FASH 153 APPAREL AND HOME FASHION ANALYSIS (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

Designed to provide information regarding the types and construction features of fashion apparel (including product knowledge of children's, men's and women's apparel) and accessories necessary for fashion buying, consumer information, and the interpretation of this information. This course includes study of textile and non-textile merchandising, fashion lines, and forecasting for home fashions. Transfer credit: CSU.

FASH 156 FASHION SHOWS AND SPECIAL EVENTS (3)

(Spring Semester only.)

Three lecture hours per week.

Designed to provide the basic techniques needed for the visual presentation of merchandise through production of fashion shows and special events. The student will be involved in the observation and production of various types of shows and promotions. Transfer credit: CSU.

FASH 160 BUSINESS OF IMAGE CONSULTING (2)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: FASH 117 or equivalent.

This course will acquaint students with the principles and practices of the image consulting industry. Setting up and marketing a business; developing a professional knowledge base and resources; working with clientele; setting fees and keeping business records. Students will gain 'how-to' experience through lectures, field trips and individual and group projects. Transfer credit: CSU.


FASH 225 APPAREL ANALYSIS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Provides students with an overview of the apparel production cycle: how apparel products are designed, created, and distributed. Students analyze garment design and construction features in order to understand their relationship to apparel cost and quality. Style terminology, sizing, price points, fabric choices, sustainability and other factors in apparel production are also discussed. Transfer Credit: CSU.


FASH 226 VISUAL MERCHANDISING AND DISPLAY (3)  
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Explores the visual merchandising and display methods used within the fashion and related industries and the role each method plays in these industries. Introduces the equipment, materials and techniques used to create dynamic visual displays. Students critique and create visual displays and visual merchandising materials. Transfer credit: CSU.

FASH 228 FASHION SHOW PRODUCTION (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Plan, prepare and present fashion information through a variety or methods including informal and formal runway shows and written communication. Become aware of the decision making necessary to produce small and large scale fashion events. Allows students to discuss and experience all aspects of a professional fashion show: set design, lighting, music, advertising and public relations, ticket sales and seating, organization of garments and accessories, choreography, models, judging, and hospitality. Transfer credit: CSU.


FASH 665 SELECTED TOPICS IN FASHION (.5 or 1 or 1.5)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours for each .5 unit.
Designed to enhance interest and develop skills in the business of fashion. The course will focus on one of the following specific topics: principles in color, basics of visual display, business of modeling, fashion as a cultural experience, fashion survey. Transfer credit: CSU.

FCS 113 TEXTILES (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

Study of natural and chemical fibers; yarns and cloth construction, weaving, finishing, dyeing. Study of purchase, use and care of textiles. Federal legislation, cost and labeling as related to consumer use. Student will examine the various characteristics of fibers and fabrics, including health and comfort levels on the body. Also listed as FASH 113. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

FCS 117 CREATING A PERSONAL IMAGE (3)

Three lecture hours per week.

A course designed to aid the student in adapting a fashion appearance appropriate for professional and personal care. Concepts in awareness of personal coloring, figure considerations, hair styling, and use of makeup. Wardrobe planning and selection, accessorizing, and shopping strategies will be emphasized. Specific material for both men and women will be presented. Also listed as FASH 117. Transfer credit: CSU.

FCS 119 CLOTHING, CULTURE AND SOCIETY (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

Study of bodily adornment in terms of cultural, ethnic, historical, sociological, psychological, and economic considerations. Comparison will be made of various cultures and subcultures. Fashion trends and merchandising techniques as they affect the consumer will also be discussed. Student will examine the importance of clothing as an expression of individual and group identity. Also listed as FASH 119. Transfer credit: CSU (C1).

FCS 212 CHILD, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

An overview of contemporary family and community issues influencing childhood. Interactions among the child, family, school, peers, media, and the community are explored. The course focuses on the socialization process, including cultural and ethnic diversity, parenting styles, gender roles, and the role of the community. Community resources available to children and families are also covered. Also listed as ECE. 212. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

FCS 213 CHILD-PARENT RELATIONS (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

Emotional, social, intellectual and physical development of children with an emphasis on a multicultural approach to parent-child relations, diversity of family systems in today's society, and how these influence the developing child. Also listed as ECE. 214. Transfer credit: CSU (E1).


FCS 310 NUTRITION (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Basic concepts of nutrition. Role of nutrients in maintenance of life processes; utilization of food by the body; hunger and appetite; personal nutrition evaluation, the relation between proper nutrition and healthy lifestyle. Special emphasis given to nutrition education and community, national and world nutrition problems. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E1).


FCS 311 CHILDREN’S NUTRITION (1)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
This course is designed to assist parents of young children to develop an understanding of how nutrition contributes to mental and physical growth. The student will learn ways to teach these principles to young children. There will be simple food preparation techniques, and an examination of current literature. Transfer credit: CSU.

FCS 313 HOLISTIC PERSPECTIVE IN NUTRITION (1)

Three lecture hours per week for six weeks. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

This course will provide an overview of both traditional and holistic principles of nutrition, including nutrients and their use in preventing nutritional deficiencies and maintaining health. Included in the course will be a critical analysis of nutritional programs such as food combining, vegetarian, and macrobiotics. Attention will also be given to the effects of environment, mind, and emotions on nutrition. Transfer credit: CSU (E1).


FCS 665 SELECTED TOPICS IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES (.5 or 1 or 1.5)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours for each .5 unit.
Discussion and evaluation of current topics, trends and issues in the field of family and consumer sciences. New concepts include review of research and application of findings. The course will focus on one of the following topics related to nutrition and child-family studies issues: nutrition and aging, nutrition and sports training, nutrition and weight control, nutrition and pregnancy/ lactation, nutrition and HIV/AIDS, nutrition, foods and world culture, and survey/ trends and issues in family and consumer sciences. Transfer credit: CSU.

FILI 110 ELEMENTARY FILIPINO (5)
Minimum of 80 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Beginner's course in Filipino grammar, composition and reading. Practice in speaking and understanding Filipino. Introduction to the history, grammar, sentence structure, idioms, and cultural aspects naturally intertwined with the language; introductions to honorifics, formal second person singular form, the respect particles, and everyday greetings and formularies indicating politeness and respect for the persons addressed. This course is conducted primarily in Filipino.Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

FILI 111, 112 ELEMENTARY FILIPINO I and II (3, 3)
(formerly TAGA 111, 112)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours /semester. FILI 111 – Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent. FILI 112 – Prerequisite: FILI 111 or equivalent.
A basic course sequence for native and non-native students. The student will acquire a basic ability to speak, read and write in Filipino at the elementary level and will learn about the customs, culture and history of the Filipino world. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

FILI 111, 112 ELEMENTARY FILIPINO I and II (3, 3)
(formerly TAGA 111, 112)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours /semester. FILI 111 – Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent. FILI 112 – Prerequisite: FILI 111 or equivalent.
A basic course sequence for native and non-native students. The student will acquire a basic ability to speak, read and write in Filipino at the elementary level and will learn about the customs, culture and history of the Filipino world. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).


FILI 120 ADVANCED ELEMENTARY FILIPINO (5)
Minimum of 80 lecture hours /semester. Prerequisite: FILI 110 or 112, or equivalent.

A continuation of FILI 110 or FILI 112, for students who can use Filipino to communicate about the “here and now” and relate a simple story in the past. Students practice and develop further communicative competence in written and spoke Filipino for use in a variety of social contexts and settings. Readings are used as the basis for classroom discussions. Cultural aspects of the Filipino-speaking communities are emphasized. The course is conducted primarily in Filipino. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

FILM 370 FILM PRODUCTION (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Four to six hours per week plus additional lab hours by arrangement.

A basic course in the techniques of film production, including operation of motion picture cameras, meters, lenses and related equipment, scripting for film, editing for pictorial continuity. Emphasis on production crew functions. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).


FILM 375 SCRIPTWRITING FOR TELEVISION AND FILM (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Formats and techniques of writing for film and television, including the study and analysis of professional scripts. Scripting assignments will include news features, public service announcements, commercials, dramatic shorts, and documentary and information films. Transfer credit: CSU.


FILM 380 BASIC VIDEO PRODUCTION (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester.
Course introduces students to basic video field production, including an orientation to studio production. It incorporates elements of producing, directing, lighting, sound recording, working on a production crew, preparing video titles and graphics, video editing and field production with camcorders. Two video projects are required. Transfer credit: CSU.


FILM 385 INTERMEDIATE FILM/VIDEO WORKSHOP (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 32 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: FILM 370 or 380. Recommended: FILM 375.
Students learn advanced camera, lighting and editing techniques as they work on individual projects or collaborate with other students on short film or video projects. They will produce short works based on scripts they have written, or scripts written by students in Film 375. Transfer credit: CSU.


FILM 440 FILM STUDY AND APPRECIATION (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A critical look at film history and culture from silent and classical Hollywood to Japanese and European films. Students learn to critique classical, modern and avant-garde films and to analyze the structure of cinematic language, i.e., motifs, metaphors, narrative cause-effect devices and oppositions. Students develop a visual and ideological understanding of film. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).


FILM 450 GREAT FILM DIRECTORS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A study of great film directors using the “auteur’’ approach to film criticism. Students will study in depth the films of great directors such as Hitchcock, Altman and Kubrick using signature themes and visual style to compare and contrast their works. Thematic evolution and historical connections will also be examined. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

FITN 106 VARSITY CONDITIONING (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

Minimum of 24 class hours for each .5 unit plus 16 hours by arrangement for classes less than or equal to 1.0 unit and 32 hours by arrangement for classes greater than 1.0 unit.

Intended for out-of-season varsity athletes to provide fitness and strength programs that will prepare them for intercollegiate competition. May include strength, cardiovascular, agility, speed and sport specific training. (May be taken four times for a maximum of eight units.) Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 106 VARSITY CONDITIONING (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

Minimum of 24 class hours for each .5 unit plus 16 hours by arrangement for classes less than or equal to 1.0 unit and 32 hours by arrangement for classes greater than 1.0 unit.

Intended for out-of-season varsity athletes to provide fitness and strength programs that will prepare them for intercollegiate competition. May include strength, cardiovascular, agility, speed and sport specific training. (May be taken four times for a maximum of eight units.) Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 107 INTERCOLLEGIATE FITNESS (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester for classes less than or equal to 1.0 unit and 32 hours by arrangement/semester for classes greater than 1.0 unit.

Intended for in-season varsity athletes to maintain fitness during their intercollegiate season. Strength training, cardiovascular conditioning, flexibility, injury prevention, psychological preparation and nutrition will be emphasized. (May be taken four times for a maximum of eight units.) Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

FITN 107 INTERCOLLEGIATE FITNESS (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester for classes less than or equal to 1.0 unit and 32 hours by arrangement/semester for classes greater than 1.0 unit.

Intended for in-season varsity athletes to maintain fitness during their intercollegiate season. Strength training, cardiovascular conditioning, flexibility, injury prevention, psychological preparation and nutrition will be emphasized. (May be taken four times for a maximum of eight units.) Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

FITN 112.1 CROSS TRAINING I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

A beginning level course designed to incorporate strength training and fitness concepts for overall body conditioning using a variety of fitness activities. Course may include Spinning, weight training or resistance exercises, yoga, Pilates, hiking, running, and/or fitness walking. Students will improve fitness levels, increase strength and flexibility, and lose body fat while participating in a variety of fitness activities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 112.1 CROSS TRAINING I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

A beginning level course designed to incorporate strength training and fitness concepts for overall body conditioning using a variety of fitness activities. Course may include Spinning, weight training or resistance exercises, yoga, Pilates, hiking, running, and/or fitness walking. Students will improve fitness levels, increase strength and flexibility, and lose body fat while participating in a variety of fitness activities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 112.2 CROSS TRAINING II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An intermediate level course designed to incorporate strength training and fitness concepts for overall body conditioning using a variety of fitness activities. Students will improve fitness levels, increase strength and flexibility, and lose body fat while participating in a variety of fitness activities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 112.2 CROSS TRAINING II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An intermediate level course designed to incorporate strength training and fitness concepts for overall body conditioning using a variety of fitness activities. Students will improve fitness levels, increase strength and flexibility, and lose body fat while participating in a variety of fitness activities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 112.3 CROSS TRAINING III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level course designed to incorporate strength training and fitness concepts for overall body conditioning using a variety of fitness activities. Students will improve fitness levels, increase strength and flexibility, and lose body fat while participating in a variety of fitness activities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 112.3 CROSS TRAINING III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level course designed to incorporate strength training and fitness concepts for overall body conditioning using a variety of fitness activities. Students will improve fitness levels, increase strength and flexibility, and lose body fat while participating in a variety of fitness activities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 112.4 CROSS TRAINING IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced level course designed to incorporate strength training and fitness concepts for overall body conditioning using a variety of fitness activities. Students will improve fitness levels, increase strength and flexibility, and lose body fat while participating in a variety of fitness activities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 112.4 CROSS TRAINING IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced level course designed to incorporate strength training and fitness concepts for overall body conditioning using a variety of fitness activities. Students will improve fitness levels, increase strength and flexibility, and lose body fat while participating in a variety of fitness activities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 116.1 BODY CONDITIONING I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction and personal fitness program development on a beginning level. Emphasis on various stretching and flexibility methods, the design of individual strength programs, and latest information of scientific application to developing aerobic fitness and wellness at a beginning level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 116.1 BODY CONDITIONING I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction and personal fitness program development on a beginning level. Emphasis on various stretching and flexibility methods, the design of individual strength programs, and latest information of scientific application to developing aerobic fitness and wellness at a beginning level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 116.2 BODY CONDITIONING II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction and personal fitness program development on an intermediate level. Emphasis on various stretching and flexibility methods, the design of individual strength programs, and latest information of scientific application to developing aerobic fitness and wellness at an intermediate level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 116.2 BODY CONDITIONING II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction and personal fitness program development on an intermediate level. Emphasis on various stretching and flexibility methods, the design of individual strength programs, and latest information of scientific application to developing aerobic fitness and wellness at an intermediate level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 116.3 BODY CONDITIONING III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction and personal fitness program development on an advanced intermediate level. Emphasis on various stretching and flexibility methods, the design of individual strength programs, and latest information of scientific application to developing aerobic fitness and wellness at an advanced intermediate level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 116.3 BODY CONDITIONING III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction and personal fitness program development on an advanced intermediate level. Emphasis on various stretching and flexibility methods, the design of individual strength programs, and latest information of scientific application to developing aerobic fitness and wellness at an advanced intermediate level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 116.4 BODY CONDITIONING IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continued instruction and personal fitness program development on an advanced level. Emphasis on various stretching and flexibility methods, the design of individual strength programs, and latest information of scientific application to developing aerobic fitness and wellness at an advanced level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 116.4 BODY CONDITIONING IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continued instruction and personal fitness program development on an advanced level. Emphasis on various stretching and flexibility methods, the design of individual strength programs, and latest information of scientific application to developing aerobic fitness and wellness at an advanced level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 160 (W) WOMEN'S CONDITIONING (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

One and one half or three class hours and one hour by arrangement per week.

Study and practice of movements to develop or improve individual physical fitness. Exercises range from mild to vigorous. Individual fitness programs will be developed. Endurance activities are stressed. Emphasis on understanding the needs and benefits of regular and continuing exercise. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 160 (W) WOMEN'S CONDITIONING (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

One and one half or three class hours and one hour by arrangement per week.

Study and practice of movements to develop or improve individual physical fitness. Exercises range from mild to vigorous. Individual fitness programs will be developed. Endurance activities are stressed. Emphasis on understanding the needs and benefits of regular and continuing exercise. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 166.1 GOLF FITNESS I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intended for golfers of all ages and beginning fitness levels. Students will increase strength, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness levels in activities and exercises geared towards improving golf performance. Beginning level individualized programs will be created. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 166.1 GOLF FITNESS I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intended for golfers of all ages and beginning fitness levels. Students will increase strength, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness levels in activities and exercises geared towards improving golf performance. Beginning level individualized programs will be created. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 166.2 GOLF FITNESS II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intended for golfers of all ages and fitness levels. Students will increase strength, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness levels in intermediate level activities and exercises geared towards improving golf performance. Intermediate level individualized programs will be created. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 166.2 GOLF FITNESS II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intended for golfers of all ages and fitness levels. Students will increase strength, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness levels in intermediate level activities and exercises geared towards improving golf performance. Intermediate level individualized programs will be created. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 166.3 GOLF FITNESS III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intended for golfers of all ages and fitness levels. Students will increase strength, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness levels in advanced intermediate level activities and exercises geared towards improving golf performance. Advanced intermediate level individualized programs will be created. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 166.3 GOLF FITNESS III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intended for golfers of all ages and fitness levels. Students will increase strength, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness levels in advanced intermediate level activities and exercises geared towards improving golf performance. Advanced intermediate level individualized programs will be created. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 166.4 GOLF FITNESS IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intended for golfers of all ages and fitness levels. Students will increase strength, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness levels in advanced level activities and exercises geared towards improving golf performance. Advanced level individualized programs will be created. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 166.4 GOLF FITNESS IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Intended for golfers of all ages and fitness levels. Students will increase strength, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness levels in advanced level activities and exercises geared towards improving golf performance. Advanced level individualized programs will be created. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2)

FITN 182 (C) INTRODUCTION TO TAI CHI (.5 or 1 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

A minimum of 24, 48 or 96 class hours.

An introduction to Tai Chi as an internal martial art using flowing, circular movements to generate power and energy, such that 'soft' is able to overcome 'hard.' Students will learn the 37-posture Yange style short form to enhance balance, posture, concentration, circulation, and relaxation. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

FITN 182 (C) INTRODUCTION TO TAI CHI (.5 or 1 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

A minimum of 24, 48 or 96 class hours.

An introduction to Tai Chi as an internal martial art using flowing, circular movements to generate power and energy, such that 'soft' is able to overcome 'hard.' Students will learn the 37-posture Yange style short form to enhance balance, posture, concentration, circulation, and relaxation. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

FITN 199 INTERACTIVE CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester.

A fitness course utilizing technology to verify performance via self-reported cardiovascular exercise, assignments, testing and discussion. Students will learn to improve fitness through the use of cardiovascular exercise. Students are required to have an iPod Nano and Nike+ iPod Sport Kit or Nike+ Sportband. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

FITN 199 INTERACTIVE CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester.

A fitness course utilizing technology to verify performance via self-reported cardiovascular exercise, assignments, testing and discussion. Students will learn to improve fitness through the use of cardiovascular exercise. Students are required to have an iPod Nano and Nike+ iPod Sport Kit or Nike+ Sportband. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

FITN 199.1 INTERACTIVE CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS I (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester.

A beginning level fitness course utilizing technology to verify performance via self-reported cardiovascular exercise, assignments, testing and discussion. Students will learn to improve fitness through the use of cardiovascular exercise. Students are required to have an iPod Nano and Nike + iPod Sport Kit or Nike + Sportband. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 199.1 INTERACTIVE CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS I (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester.

A beginning level fitness course utilizing technology to verify performance via self-reported cardiovascular exercise, assignments, testing and discussion. Students will learn to improve fitness through the use of cardiovascular exercise. Students are required to have an iPod Nano and Nike + iPod Sport Kit or Nike + Sportband. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 199.2 INTERACTIVE CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS II (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester.

An intermediate level fitness course utilizing technology to verify performance via self-reported cardiovascular exercise, assignments, testing and discussion. Students will improve fitness through the use of cardiovascular exercise. Students are required to have an iPod Nano and Nike + iPod Sport Kit or Nike + Sportband. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 199.2 INTERACTIVE CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS II (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester.

An intermediate level fitness course utilizing technology to verify performance via self-reported cardiovascular exercise, assignments, testing and discussion. Students will improve fitness through the use of cardiovascular exercise. Students are required to have an iPod Nano and Nike + iPod Sport Kit or Nike + Sportband. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 199.3 INTERACTIVE CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS III (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level fitness course utilizing technology to verify performance via self-reported cardiovascular exercise, assignments, testing and discussion. Students will improve fitness through the use of cardiovascular exercise. Students are required to have an iPod Nano and Nike + iPod Sport Kit or Nike + Sportband. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 199.3 INTERACTIVE CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS III (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level fitness course utilizing technology to verify performance via self-reported cardiovascular exercise, assignments, testing and discussion. Students will improve fitness through the use of cardiovascular exercise. Students are required to have an iPod Nano and Nike + iPod Sport Kit or Nike + Sportband. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 199.4 INTERACTIVE CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS IV (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester.

An advanced level fitness course utilizing technology to verify performance via self-reported cardiovascular exercise, assignments, testing and discussion. Students will improve fitness through the use of cardiovascular exercise. Students are required to have an iPod Nano and Nike + iPod Sport Kit or Nike + Sportband. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 199.4 INTERACTIVE CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS IV (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester.

An advanced level fitness course utilizing technology to verify performance via self-reported cardiovascular exercise, assignments, testing and discussion. Students will improve fitness through the use of cardiovascular exercise. Students are required to have an iPod Nano and Nike + iPod Sport Kit or Nike + Sportband. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 201 (M) MEN'S WEIGHT CONDITIONING BEGINNING (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

One and one half or three class hours and one hour by arrangement per week.

Beginning ' Instruction and practice in the elementary lifts and procedures of weight training. Emphasis on form and techniques, safety-procedures and strength values of weight lifting using barbells, weight machines and similar equipment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 201 (M) MEN'S WEIGHT CONDITIONING BEGINNING (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

One and one half or three class hours and one hour by arrangement per week.

Beginning ' Instruction and practice in the elementary lifts and procedures of weight training. Emphasis on form and techniques, safety-procedures and strength values of weight lifting using barbells, weight machines and similar equipment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 201.1 WEIGHT TRAINING I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction at a beginning level in lifts and protocols of weight training. Emphasis on form and techniques, safety procedures and strength values of weight lifting using barbells, weight machines and similar equipment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 201.1 WEIGHT TRAINING I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction at a beginning level in lifts and protocols of weight training. Emphasis on form and techniques, safety procedures and strength values of weight lifting using barbells, weight machines and similar equipment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 201.2 WEIGHT TRAINING II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction at an intermediate level in lifts and protocols of weight training. Emphasis on form and techniques, safety procedures and strength values of weight lifting using barbells, weight machines and similar equipment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 201.2 WEIGHT TRAINING II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction at an intermediate level in lifts and protocols of weight training. Emphasis on form and techniques, safety procedures and strength values of weight lifting using barbells, weight machines and similar equipment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 201.3 WEIGHT TRAINING III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction at an advanced intermediate level in lifts and protocols of weight training. Emphasis on form and techniques, safety procedures and strength values of weight lifting using barbells, weight machines and similar equipment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 201.3 WEIGHT TRAINING III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction at an advanced intermediate level in lifts and protocols of weight training. Emphasis on form and techniques, safety procedures and strength values of weight lifting using barbells, weight machines and similar equipment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 201.4 WEIGHT TRAINING IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction at an advanced level in lifts and protocols of weight training. Emphasis on form and techniques, safety procedures and strength values of weight lifting using barbells, weight machines and similar equipment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 201.4 WEIGHT TRAINING IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction at an advanced level in lifts and protocols of weight training. Emphasis on form and techniques, safety procedures and strength values of weight lifting using barbells, weight machines and similar equipment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 202 (M) MEN'S WEIGHT CONDITIONING INTERMEDIATE (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

One and one half or three class hours and one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Intermediate ' Beginning Weight Conditioning or equivalent.

Intermediate ' Specialization and development of individual programs. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 202 (M) MEN'S WEIGHT CONDITIONING INTERMEDIATE (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade. )

One and one half or three class hours and one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Intermediate ' Beginning Weight Conditioning or equivalent.

Intermediate ' Specialization and development of individual programs. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 219.1 CORE FITNESS TRAINING I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide core strengthening, stretching and aerobic exercise with focus on spine stabilization postures and proper knee alignment at a beginning level to improve athletic performance, activities of daily living, and injury prevention. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 219.1 CORE FITNESS TRAINING I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide core strengthening, stretching and aerobic exercise with focus on spine stabilization postures and proper knee alignment at a beginning level to improve athletic performance, activities of daily living, and injury prevention. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 219.2 CORE FITNESS TRAINING II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide core strengthening, stretching and aerobic exercise with focus on spine stabilization postures and proper knee alignment at an intermediate level to improve athletic performance, activities of daily living, and injury prevention. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 219.2 CORE FITNESS TRAINING II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide core strengthening, stretching and aerobic exercise with focus on spine stabilization postures and proper knee alignment at an intermediate level to improve athletic performance, activities of daily living, and injury prevention. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 219.3 CORE FITNESS TRAINING III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide core strengthening, stretching and aerobic exercise with focus on spine stabilization postures and proper knee alignment at an advanced intermediate level to improve athletic performance, activities of daily living, and injury prevention.Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 219.3 CORE FITNESS TRAINING III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide core strengthening, stretching and aerobic exercise with focus on spine stabilization postures and proper knee alignment at an advanced intermediate level to improve athletic performance, activities of daily living, and injury prevention.Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 219.4 CORE FITNESS TRAINING IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide core strengthening, stretching and aerobic exercise with focus on spine stabilization postures and proper knee alignment at an advanced level to improve athletic performance, activities of daily living, and injury prevention. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 219.4 CORE FITNESS TRAINING IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to provide core strengthening, stretching and aerobic exercise with focus on spine stabilization postures and proper knee alignment at an advanced level to improve athletic performance, activities of daily living, and injury prevention. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 301.1 SPINNING I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

A beginning level aerobic exercise performed on a stationary racing bicycle and done to high-cadence music. An exciting and fast-paced workout to lose body weight or improve aerobic conditioning. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 301.1 SPINNING I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

A beginning level aerobic exercise performed on a stationary racing bicycle and done to high-cadence music. An exciting and fast-paced workout to lose body weight or improve aerobic conditioning. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 301.2 SPINNING II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An intermediate level aerobic exercise performed on a stationary racing bicycle and done to high-cadence music. An exciting and fast-paced workout to lose body weight or improve aerobic conditioning. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 301.2 SPINNING II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An intermediate level aerobic exercise performed on a stationary racing bicycle and done to high-cadence music. An exciting and fast-paced workout to lose body weight or improve aerobic conditioning. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 301.3 SPINNING III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level aerobic exercise performed on a stationary racing bicycle and done to high-cadence music. An exciting and fast-paced workout to lose body weight or improve aerobic conditioning. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 301.3 SPINNING III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level aerobic exercise performed on a stationary racing bicycle and done to high-cadence music. An exciting and fast-paced workout to lose body weight or improve aerobic conditioning. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 301.4 SPINNING IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced level aerobic exercise performed on a stationary racing bicycle and done to high-cadence music. An exciting and fast-paced workout to lose body weight or improve aerobic conditioning. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 301.4 SPINNING IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced level aerobic exercise performed on a stationary racing bicycle and done to high-cadence music. An exciting and fast-paced workout to lose body weight or improve aerobic conditioning. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 304.1 WALKING FITNESS I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Students gain a beginning level understanding of cardiovascular fitness through walking. Students will evaluate their individual levels of cardiovascular fitness and develop a beginning level personal walking program. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 304.1 WALKING FITNESS I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Students gain a beginning level understanding of cardiovascular fitness through walking. Students will evaluate their individual levels of cardiovascular fitness and develop a beginning level personal walking program. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 304.2 WALKING FITNESS II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Students gain an intermediate level understanding of cardiovascular fitness through walking. Students will evaluate their individual levels of cardiovascular fitness and develop an intermediate level personal walking program. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 304.2 WALKING FITNESS II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Students gain an intermediate level understanding of cardiovascular fitness through walking. Students will evaluate their individual levels of cardiovascular fitness and develop an intermediate level personal walking program. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 304.3 WALKING FITNESS III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Students gain an advanced intermediate level understanding of cardiovascular fitness through walking. Students will evaluate their individual levels of cardiovascular fitness and develop a advanced intermediate level personal walking program. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 304.3 WALKING FITNESS III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Students gain an advanced intermediate level understanding of cardiovascular fitness through walking. Students will evaluate their individual levels of cardiovascular fitness and develop a advanced intermediate level personal walking program. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 304.4 WALKING FITNESS IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Students gain an advanced level understanding of cardiovascular fitness through walking. Students will evaluate their individual levels of cardiovascular fitness and develop a advanced level personal walking program. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 304.4 WALKING FITNESS IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Students gain an advanced level understanding of cardiovascular fitness through walking. Students will evaluate their individual levels of cardiovascular fitness and develop a advanced level personal walking program. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 305.1 CARDIOVASCULAR DEVELOPMENT - RUNNING EMPHASIS I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction in methods to achieve total fitness through beginning level cardiovascular activities with emphasis on running. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 305.1 CARDIOVASCULAR DEVELOPMENT - RUNNING EMPHASIS I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction in methods to achieve total fitness through beginning level cardiovascular activities with emphasis on running. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 305.2 CARDIOVASCULAR DEVELOPMENT - RUNNING EMPHASIS II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction in methods to achieve total fitness through intermediate level cardiovascular activities with emphasis on running. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 305.2 CARDIOVASCULAR DEVELOPMENT - RUNNING EMPHASIS II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction in methods to achieve total fitness through intermediate level cardiovascular activities with emphasis on running. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 305.3 CARDIOVASCULAR DEVELOPMENT - RUNNING EMPHASIS III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction in methods to achieve total fitness through advanced intermediate level cardiovascular activities with emphasis on running. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 305.3 CARDIOVASCULAR DEVELOPMENT - RUNNING EMPHASIS III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction in methods to achieve total fitness through advanced intermediate level cardiovascular activities with emphasis on running. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 305.4 CARDIOVASCULAR DEVELOPMENT - RUNNING EMPHASIS IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction in methods to achieve total fitness through advanced level cardiovascular activities with emphasis on running. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 305.4 CARDIOVASCULAR DEVELOPMENT - RUNNING EMPHASIS IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction in methods to achieve total fitness through advanced level cardiovascular activities with emphasis on running. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 308.1 HIKING AND TREKKING FOR FITNESS I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Introduction to the cardiovascular and weight loss benefits of the use of trekking poles while hiking. A fitness course for the outdoor enthusiast; classes will be conducted on local Bay Area trails. Trekking poles are recommended but not required. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 308.1 HIKING AND TREKKING FOR FITNESS I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Introduction to the cardiovascular and weight loss benefits of the use of trekking poles while hiking. A fitness course for the outdoor enthusiast; classes will be conducted on local Bay Area trails. Trekking poles are recommended but not required. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 308.2 HIKING AND TREKKING FOR FITNESS II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continued experience in the use of trekking poles while hiking; cardiovascular and weight loss benefits of the use of trekking poles while hiking. Classes will be conducted on local Bay Area trails. Trekking poles are recommended but not required. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 308.2 HIKING AND TREKKING FOR FITNESS II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continued experience in the use of trekking poles while hiking; cardiovascular and weight loss benefits of the use of trekking poles while hiking. Classes will be conducted on local Bay Area trails. Trekking poles are recommended but not required. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 308.3 HIKING AND TREKKING FOR FITNESS III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continued experience in the use of trekking poles at an advanced intermediate level while hiking; cardiovascular and weight loss benefits of the use of trekking poles while hiking. Classes will be conducted on local Bay Area trails. Trekking poles are recommended but not required. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 308.3 HIKING AND TREKKING FOR FITNESS III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continued experience in the use of trekking poles at an advanced intermediate level while hiking; cardiovascular and weight loss benefits of the use of trekking poles while hiking. Classes will be conducted on local Bay Area trails. Trekking poles are recommended but not required. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 308.4 HIKING AND TREKKING FOR FITNESS IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continued experience in the use of trekking poles at an advanced level while hiking; cardiovascular and weight loss benefits of the use of trekking poles while hiking. Classes will be conducted on local Bay Area trails. Trekking poles are recommended but not required. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 308.4 HIKING AND TREKKING FOR FITNESS IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continued experience in the use of trekking poles at an advanced level while hiking; cardiovascular and weight loss benefits of the use of trekking poles while hiking. Classes will be conducted on local Bay Area trails. Trekking poles are recommended but not required. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 314.1 BACKPACKING FOR FITNESS I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours plus 4 hours by arrangement/semester.

Designed to increase fitness and strength, this course will introduce students to many aspects of backpacking. Upon successful completion of this course students will, at a beginning level, be able to identify necessary backpacking equipment and supplies, develop a trip plan, investigate and avoid potential safety risks, and complete a safe overnight backpacking excursion. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 314.1 BACKPACKING FOR FITNESS I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours plus 4 hours by arrangement/semester.

Designed to increase fitness and strength, this course will introduce students to many aspects of backpacking. Upon successful completion of this course students will, at a beginning level, be able to identify necessary backpacking equipment and supplies, develop a trip plan, investigate and avoid potential safety risks, and complete a safe overnight backpacking excursion. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 314.2 BACKPACKING FOR FITNESS II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours plus 4 hours by arrangement/semester.

Designed to increase fitness and strength, this course will introduce students to many aspects of backpacking. Upon successful completion of this course students will, at an intermediate level, be able to identify necessary backpacking equipment and supplies, develop a trip plan, investigate and avoid potential safety risks, and complete a safe overnight backpacking excursion. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 314.2 BACKPACKING FOR FITNESS II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours plus 4 hours by arrangement/semester.

Designed to increase fitness and strength, this course will introduce students to many aspects of backpacking. Upon successful completion of this course students will, at an intermediate level, be able to identify necessary backpacking equipment and supplies, develop a trip plan, investigate and avoid potential safety risks, and complete a safe overnight backpacking excursion. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 314.3 BACKPACKING FOR FITNESS III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours plus 4 hours by arrangement/semester.

Designed to increase fitness and strength, this course will introduce students to many aspects of backpacking. Upon successful completion of this course students will, at an advanced intermediate level, be able to identify necessary backpacking equipment and supplies, develop a trip plan, investigate and avoid potential safety risks, and complete a safe overnight backpacking excursion. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 314.3 BACKPACKING FOR FITNESS III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours plus 4 hours by arrangement/semester.

Designed to increase fitness and strength, this course will introduce students to many aspects of backpacking. Upon successful completion of this course students will, at an advanced intermediate level, be able to identify necessary backpacking equipment and supplies, develop a trip plan, investigate and avoid potential safety risks, and complete a safe overnight backpacking excursion. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 314.4 BACKPACKING FOR FITNESS IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours plus 4 hours by arrangement/semester.

Designed to increase fitness and strength, this course will introduce students to many aspects of backpacking. Upon successful completion of this course students will, at an advanced level, be able to identify necessary backpacking equipment and supplies, develop a trip plan, investigate and avoid potential safety risks, and complete a safe overnight backpacking excursion. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 314.4 BACKPACKING FOR FITNESS IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours plus 4 hours by arrangement/semester.

Designed to increase fitness and strength, this course will introduce students to many aspects of backpacking. Upon successful completion of this course students will, at an advanced level, be able to identify necessary backpacking equipment and supplies, develop a trip plan, investigate and avoid potential safety risks, and complete a safe overnight backpacking excursion. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 332.1 STRETCHING AND FLEXIBILITY I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

A beginning course designed to increase flexibility, tone the body, improve circulation, teach proper breathing and relaxation, and create basic understanding of what is necessary for good health. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 332.1 STRETCHING AND FLEXIBILITY I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

A beginning course designed to increase flexibility, tone the body, improve circulation, teach proper breathing and relaxation, and create basic understanding of what is necessary for good health. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 332.2 STRETCHING AND FLEXIBILITY II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An intermediate level course designed to increase flexibility, tone the body, improve circulation, teach proper breathing and relaxation, and create basic understanding of what is necessary for good health. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 332.2 STRETCHING AND FLEXIBILITY II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An intermediate level course designed to increase flexibility, tone the body, improve circulation, teach proper breathing and relaxation, and create basic understanding of what is necessary for good health. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 332.3 STRETCHING AND FLEXIBILITY III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level course designed to increase flexibility, tone the body, improve circulation, teach proper breathing and relaxation, and create basic understanding of what is necessary for good health. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 332.3 STRETCHING AND FLEXIBILITY III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced intermediate level course designed to increase flexibility, tone the body, improve circulation, teach proper breathing and relaxation, and create basic understanding of what is necessary for good health. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 332.4 STRETCHING AND FLEXIBILITY IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced level course designed to increase flexibility, tone the body, improve circulation, teach proper breathing and relaxation, and create basic understanding of what is necessary for good health. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 332.4 STRETCHING AND FLEXIBILITY IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

An advanced level course designed to increase flexibility, tone the body, improve circulation, teach proper breathing and relaxation, and create basic understanding of what is necessary for good health. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 334.1 YOGA I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to educate students in Hatha Yoga at a beginning level. A fitness course using yoga postures to increase flexibility, strength and endurance; improve balance, posture and breathing; teach relaxation techniques. This course is appropriate for all ages and abilities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 334.1 YOGA I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to educate students in Hatha Yoga at a beginning level. A fitness course using yoga postures to increase flexibility, strength and endurance; improve balance, posture and breathing; teach relaxation techniques. This course is appropriate for all ages and abilities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 334.2 YOGA II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to educate students in Hatha Yoga at an intermediate level. A fitness course using yoga postures to increase flexibility, strength and endurance; improve balance, posture and breathing; teach relaxation techniques. This course is appropriate for continuing yoga students. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 334.2 YOGA II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to educate students in Hatha Yoga at an intermediate level. A fitness course using yoga postures to increase flexibility, strength and endurance; improve balance, posture and breathing; teach relaxation techniques. This course is appropriate for continuing yoga students. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 334.3 YOGA III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to educate students in Hatha Yoga at an advanced intermediate level. A fitness course using yoga postures to increase flexibility, strength and endurance; improve balance, posture and breathing; teach relaxation techniques. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 334.3 YOGA III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to educate students in Hatha Yoga at an advanced intermediate level. A fitness course using yoga postures to increase flexibility, strength and endurance; improve balance, posture and breathing; teach relaxation techniques. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 334.4 YOGA IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to educate students in Hatha Yoga at an advanced level. A fitness course using yoga postures to increase flexibility, strength and endurance; improve balance, posture and breathing; teach relaxation techniques. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 334.4 YOGA IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Designed to educate students in Hatha Yoga at an advanced level. A fitness course using yoga postures to increase flexibility, strength and endurance; improve balance, posture and breathing; teach relaxation techniques. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 335.1 PILATES I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Training of the muscles in the torso through controlled exercises taught at a beginning level designed to improve posture, coordination and balance; build core strength; and increase flexibility and agility. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 335.1 PILATES I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Training of the muscles in the torso through controlled exercises taught at a beginning level designed to improve posture, coordination and balance; build core strength; and increase flexibility and agility. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 335.2 PILATES II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Training of the muscles in the torso through controlled exercises taught at an intermediate level designed to improve posture, coordination and balance; build core strength; and increase flexibility and agility. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 335.2 PILATES II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Training of the muscles in the torso through controlled exercises taught at an intermediate level designed to improve posture, coordination and balance; build core strength; and increase flexibility and agility. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 335.3 PILATES III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Training of the muscles in the torso through controlled exercises taught at an advanced intermediate level designed to improve posture, coordination and balance; build core strength; and increase flexibility and agility. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 335.3 PILATES III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Training of the muscles in the torso through controlled exercises taught at an advanced intermediate level designed to improve posture, coordination and balance; build core strength; and increase flexibility and agility. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 335.4 PILATES IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Training of the muscles in the torso through controlled exercises taught at an advanced level designed to improve posture, coordination and balance; build core strength; and increase flexibility and agility. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 335.4 PILATES IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Training of the muscles in the torso through controlled exercises taught at an advanced level designed to improve posture, coordination and balance; build core strength; and increase flexibility and agility. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 400.1 FITNESS ACADEMY I (1 or 2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade)

Minimum of 48, 96 or 144 lab hours/semester.

Various fitness activities designed to raise students’ individual fitness levels. After assessment of the students’ fitness levels through completion of division fitness tests, personal exercise regimens will be prepared for each student. Students must meet with the instructor for orientation. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 400.1 FITNESS ACADEMY I (1 or 2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade)

Minimum of 48, 96 or 144 lab hours/semester.

Various fitness activities designed to raise students’ individual fitness levels. After assessment of the students’ fitness levels through completion of division fitness tests, personal exercise regimens will be prepared for each student. Students must meet with the instructor for orientation. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 400.2 FITNESS ACADEMY II (1 or 2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade)

Minimum of 48, 96 or 144 lab hours/semester.

Building on concepts learned in FITN 400.1, students will participate in various fitness activities designed to raise their individual fitness levels. After assessment of the students’ fitness levels through completion of division fitness tests, intermediate level personal exercise regimens will be prepared for each student. Students must meet with the instructor for orientation. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 400.2 FITNESS ACADEMY II (1 or 2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade)

Minimum of 48, 96 or 144 lab hours/semester.

Building on concepts learned in FITN 400.1, students will participate in various fitness activities designed to raise their individual fitness levels. After assessment of the students’ fitness levels through completion of division fitness tests, intermediate level personal exercise regimens will be prepared for each student. Students must meet with the instructor for orientation. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 400.3 FITNESS ACADEMY III (1 or 2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade)

Minimum of 48, 96 or 144 lab hours/semester.

Building on concepts from FITN 400.2, students will participate in various fitness activities designed to raise their individual fitness levels. After assessment of the students’ fitness levels through completion of division fitness tests, advanced intermediate level personal exercise regimens will be prepared for each student. Students must meet with the instructor for orientation. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 400.3 FITNESS ACADEMY III (1 or 2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade)

Minimum of 48, 96 or 144 lab hours/semester.

Building on concepts from FITN 400.2, students will participate in various fitness activities designed to raise their individual fitness levels. After assessment of the students’ fitness levels through completion of division fitness tests, advanced intermediate level personal exercise regimens will be prepared for each student. Students must meet with the instructor for orientation. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 400.4 FITNESS ACADEMY IV (1 or 2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade)

Minimum of 48, 96 or 144 lab hours/semester.

Building on concepts from FITN 400.3, students will participate in various fitness activities designed to raise their individual fitness levels. After assessment of the students’ fitness levels through completion of division fitness tests, advanced level personal exercise regimens will be prepared for each student. Students must meet with the instructor for orientation. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

FITN 400.4 FITNESS ACADEMY IV (1 or 2 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade)

Minimum of 48, 96 or 144 lab hours/semester.

Building on concepts from FITN 400.3, students will participate in various fitness activities designed to raise their individual fitness levels. After assessment of the students’ fitness levels through completion of division fitness tests, advanced level personal exercise regimens will be prepared for each student. Students must meet with the instructor for orientation. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

CORE FITNESS TRAINING Designed to provide strengthening, stretching and aerobic exercise with spine stabilization postures for core conditioning to improve athletic performance, activities of daily living, and injury prevention. Transfer: CSU.
CORE FITNESS TRAINING Designed to provide strengthening, stretching and aerobic exercise with spine stabilization postures for core conditioning to improve athletic performance, activities of daily living, and injury prevention. Transfer: CSU.
FITN 680SF INTERCOLLEGIATE FITNESS Intended for in-season varsity athletes to maintain fitness during their intercollegiate season. Strength training, cardiovascular conditioning, flexibility, injury prevention, psychological preparation, and nutrition will be emphasized. Transfer: CSU.
FITN 680SF INTERCOLLEGIATE FITNESS Intended for in-season varsity athletes to maintain fitness during their intercollegiate season. Strength training, cardiovascular conditioning, flexibility, injury prevention, psychological preparation, and nutrition will be emphasized. Transfer: CSU.
FITN 680SG INTERACTIVE CARDIOVASCULAR TRAINING An online fitness course utilizing technology to verify performance via self-reported cardiovascular exercise, assignments, testing and discussion. Students will learn to improve fitness through the use of cardiovascular exercise. Students are required to have an iPOD Nano and Nike + iPOD Sport Kit or Nike + Sportband. Transfer: CSU.
FITN 680SG INTERACTIVE CARDIOVASCULAR TRAINING An online fitness course utilizing technology to verify performance via self-reported cardiovascular exercise, assignments, testing and discussion. Students will learn to improve fitness through the use of cardiovascular exercise. Students are required to have an iPOD Nano and Nike + iPOD Sport Kit or Nike + Sportband. Transfer: CSU.
FITN 680SH STRESS MANAGEMENT: LIFE SKILLS FOR OPTIMAL HEALTH (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Examines the relationship between a person’s thoughts/emotions and physical injuries or illnesses with the intent to create ideal mental and physical health. Includes one hour of lecture and one and a half hours of practical application per week. Students will experience/practice and compare meditation and other various relaxation techniques. Transfer credit: CSU.

FITN 680SH STRESS MANAGEMENT: LIFE SKILLS FOR OPTIMAL HEALTH (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Examines the relationship between a person’s thoughts/emotions and physical injuries or illnesses with the intent to create ideal mental and physical health. Includes one hour of lecture and one and a half hours of practical application per week. Students will experience/practice and compare meditation and other various relaxation techniques. Transfer credit: CSU.


GEOG 100 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Corequisite: GEOG 101.
Study of the basic characteristics and distributions of Earth’s physical features, natural systems (such as global winds, ocean circulations, and the rock cycle) and phenomena (such as hurricanes, earthquakes and volcanoes). Includes basic characteristics of maps, seasons, weather, climate, ecosystems, biomes, water processes and landforms. This course must be taken with GEOG 101. Transfer credit: CSU (B1).

GEOG 101 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY LAB (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Corequisite: GEOG 100. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Practical application of the basic concepts of Physical Geography. Students will use the tools of geography, such as maps and field observations, to enrich their understanding of the Earth’s physical processes. Topics include Earth-Sun relationships, weather, climate, landforms, water, ecosystems, and their spatial relationships. Transfer credit: CSU (B3).


GEOG 110 CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Introduction to cultural geography with a survey of major world cultural patterns, resources, population, and the changing relationships of human groups and the physical environment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


GEOG 150 WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A basic survey of geographic regions of the world. The location of physical and cultural regions such as mountain ranges, climatic regions, population centers, urban-economic concentrations, and political divisions. There will be an emphasis on historical influences and future trends in the changing world. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


GEOG 300 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE (GIS) (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent; and skill in using Windows operating system and internet, such as acquired in BCM. 104 and BCM. 400, or equivalent.
An introduction to the rapidly expanding field of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and the broader discipline of Geographic Information Science. Includes both theory and software training, and provides a framework to understand how spatial data is gathered, integrated, interpreted, manipulated and analyzed. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

GEOG 301 INTRODUCTION TO MAP READING FOR GIS (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A total of 32 class hours. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836; and skill in using Windows operating system and internet, such as found in CAOT 104 and CAOT 400, or equivalent.

This course focuses on map reading skills and introduces the many uses of geographic information systems software. Emphasis on cartographic techniques from paper maps to computer generated maps. Transfer credit: CSU.

GEOG 302 INTRODUCTION TO GIS AND ARC VIEW (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A total of 32 class hours. Prerequisite: GEOG 301. Recommended: Skill in using Windows operating system and internet, such as found in CAOT 104 and CAOT 400, or equivalent.

This course introduces and provides hands-on instruction in ArcView geographic information systems software. Focus is on the functionality of GIS as an effective tool for modeling and analyzing complex spatial relationships. Transfer credit: CSU.

GEOG 303 GIS APPLICATIONS (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A total of 32 class hours. Prerequisite: GEOG 302. Recommended: Skill in using Windows operating system and internet, such as found in CAOT 104 and CAOT 400, or equivalent.

Applications of ArcView GIS software. Emphasis is placed on training in use of technology and software in order to provide students with skills and a conceptual basis on which to build further expertise in GIS. Students will complete projects in an area of their choice. Transfer credit: CSU.


GEOL 100 SURVEY OF GEOLOGY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Introduction to the origin of rocks and minerals; the processes which have been important throughout geologic time, both on and beneath the surface, in giving the earth its present form; and the principles of scientific investigation that are used in interpreting geologic features. A brief sketch of the geological history of the earth and evolution of its animal and plant inhabitants. Not open to students who have taken or are taking GEOL 210. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1).



GEOL 105 ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCE (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Investigation of environmental earth science topics including aspects of weather and climate, ground and surface water, geologic processes and land forms, recovery and utilization of natural resources, air and water pollution, and energy. Emphasis on understanding and avoiding the dangers of natural hazards such as storms, floods, earthquakes, and landslides. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1).

GEOL 180 GEOLOGY OF CALIFORNIA (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

An overview of the general principles of geology with examples from the great diversity of local and regional features found in California. Comparisons to other parts of the world are made, demonstrating that the Golden State contains a microcosm of global geologic evolution. Emphasis on the significant interaction of geology and life in California from the Gold Rush through the Great Earthquake to today. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1).


GEOL 210 GENERAL GEOLOGY (4)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester plus field trips by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Introduction to the nature and structure of the materials composing the earth and of the various processes which shape the earth’s surface. Recommended for non-science majors to fulfill laboratory science transfer requirement. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, 3).


GEOL 220 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY (4)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: GEOL 100 or GEOL 210, or equivalent.
Origin and history of the Earth and its development through geologic time. The formation of continents and ocean basins and their modifications through time. The evolution of plants and animals as seen through the fossil record. Emphasis on the geologic history of North America. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

GEOL 611 FIELD GEOLOGY I (1)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Field trips by arrangement. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in GEOL 100 or GEOL 210, or equivalent.

Supervised field investigation of selected geologic phenomena. Local field trips and/or weekend excursions to areas of geologic interest (i.e., Lassen Volcanic National Park, Yosemite National Park, Pinnacles National Monument). May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU).


HIST 100 HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION I (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Cultural, political, and economic survey of Western history from the beginnings in the Near East to 1660. Emphasis on the intellectual, artistic, and institutional foundations of Western civilization. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).


HIST 101 HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION II (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Western civilization from 1660 to the present, with particular emphasis on European cultural, social, and political development in the 19th and 20th centuries. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).


HIST 104 WORLD CIVILIZATIONS I (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A global and historical survey of civilizations from ancient times to 1500. Focus on Asia/Pacific Islands, Africa, Europe, the Americas, and the Middle East. Emphasis on the origins and development of diverse cultures, political systems, major religions, noted empires, artistic/intellectual achievements, and technological breakthroughs. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).


HIST 106 WORLD CIVILIZATIONS II (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A global and historical survey course of world civilizations from 1500 to the present. Focus on Asia/Pacific Islands, Africa, Europe, the Americas, and the Middle East. Emphasis on the origins of global interdependence, revolutions and nationalist movements, the global economy, cultural and religious issues, technological advancements, and current social issues. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).


HIST 108 SURVEY OF AMERICAN HISTORY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Partially satisfies American History and Institutions requirement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A single semester survey that stresses major social, political, and cultural developments in the history of the United States. The course examines selected events, personalities and trends from the colonial period to the present. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D1).


HIST 109 EUROPE SINCE 1945 (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Analysis of Europe from the end of WWII through the present. Topics include postwar reconstruction, the Cold War, new social movements, cultural differences, the fall of communism, ethnic cleansing, and European unity. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).


HIST 201 UNITED STATES HISTORY I (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Partially satisfies American History and Institutions requirement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
U.S. history to the mid-19th century, emphasizing the development of U.S. political, social, economic and cultural foundations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D1).


HIST 202 UNITED STATES HISTORY II (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Partially satisfies American History and Institutions requirement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
U.S. History from Reconstruction to the present. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D1).


HIST 203 THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1945 (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
United States history since 1945. Focus on the principal political, social, economic, and cultural challenges and achievements in American life. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).


HIST 235 HISTORY OF ETHNIC GROUPS IN THE UNITED STATES (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A survey of the social, economic and political history of ethnic groups in the United States, with particular emphasis on minority communities. In addition to examining the histories of individual ethnic communities, the course will explore the historical relationships between different groups. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D1).


HIST 240 HISTORY OF ETHNIC GROUPS IN CALIFORNIA (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Partially satisfies American History and Institutions requirement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A survey of the social, economic and political history of ethnic groups in California, with particular emphasis on minority communities. In addition to examining the histories of individual ethnic communities, the course will explore the historical relationships between different groups. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D2a).


HIST 244 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Partially satisfies American History and Institutions requirement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A history of the African-American community, beginning with an introduction to West African society and continuing through colonial times to the present. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D1).

HIST 248 WOMEN AND THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
This course will examine the experience of women in the United States from the colonial era to the present. Exploration of the diverse ways in which women have lived, worked and contributed to the social, cultural, political and economic development of the United States. Transfer: UC; CSU (C2, D3).

HIST 300 HISTORY OF SAN FRANCISCO (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
The history of San Francisco from its discovery to the present focusing on how it became a prominent U.S. city. Major topics include geography, native populations, European discovery, gold rush, multicultural aspects, social life, politics, natural disasters, crime and punishment, neighborhoods, historical landmarks, parks, transportation, architecture, and international events. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


HIST 310 CALIFORNIA HISTORY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Partially satisfies American History and Institutions requirement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A study of contemporary California with inquiry into how and why its political, economic, social and cultural qualities have developed. Includes examination of the native Californian, Spanish and American Periods; the institutions, functions and interrelations of federal, state and local politics; California’s membership in the Pacific community; and the environment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D2a).


HIST 335 HISTORY AND POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE EAST (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Examination of the historical, political, economic and social issues of the Middle East, including the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict and U.S. foreign policy in the area. Also listed as PLSC 335. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).


HIST 420 SURVEY OF LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A comparative, chronological survey of South and Central American history including geography, indigenous peoples, early contact with Europeans, conquest, and struggle for independence. Development of modern Latin American nations, cultural uniqueness, economics, politics, society, and current problems will be explored. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).


HIST 429 HISTORY OF LATINOS IN THE UNITED STATES (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Examination of the impact of the Latino/a Diaspora on the culture, identity and politics in the United States from Spanish exploration in the Americas to the contemporary period.  Emphasis on the Latino/a effect on American political, cultural, and economic systems and institutions. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).


HIST 430 EARLY ASIAN CIVILIZATIONS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A historical and cultural survey of East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Philippines from the origins to the 18th Century. Emphasis will be on a critical evaluation of the main social, political, economic, cultural, intellectual and historical trends that have shaped the Asian countries. Transfer credit: CSU (C2, D3).


HIST 432 MODERN ASIAN CIVILIZATIONS (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A historical and cultural survey of East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Middle East, and the Philippines from the 17th century to the present. Emphasis will be on a critical evaluation of the main social, political, economic, cultural, intellectual and historical trends that have shaped the Asian countries. A study of the various modern Asian civilizations is encouraged as a means of acquiring a broad comparative perspective. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).


HIST 435 HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A historical and cultural survey of the Philippines from its origins to the present. Emphasis will be on a critical evaluation of the main social, political, economic, cultural, intellectual and historical trends that have shaped the Philippines. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).


HIST 436 FILIPINOS IN AMERICA (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A historical and cultural survey of Filipinos in America from early settlements in Louisiana, Hawaii and the west coast to the present. Emphasis will be on a critical evaluation of the main social, political, economic, cultural, intellectual and historical trends that shaped the various Filipino communities in the United States. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

HIST 444 SURVEY OF SUB-SAHARAN HISTORY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Survey of Sub-Saharan African history. Topics include the origins and impact of the slave trade; European colonialism; political, social and economic development; and contemporary issues. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).

HIST 453 HISTORY OF CHINA (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A historical and cultural survey of China from its legendary creation to the present. Emphasis will be on a critical evaluation of the main social, political, economic, cultural, intellectual and historical trends that have shaped China. A study of China and the various Asian civilizations surrounding China is encouraged as a means of acquiring a broad comparative perspective. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).


HIST 461 GREAT CITIES OF THE WORLD: PARIS, MADRID AND ISTANBUL (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
An in-depth analysis of the great cities of the world with an emphasis on the more important political, economic, social, artistic and cultural aspects. Cities to be studied are Paris, Madrid and Istanbul. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

HIST 462 GREAT CITIES OF THE WORLD: LONDON, CAIRO AND ROME (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
An in-depth analysis of the great cities of the world with an emphasis on the more important political, economic, social, artistic and cultural aspects. Cities to be studied are London, Cairo and Rome. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

HIST 463 GREAT CITIES OF THE WORLD: FLORENCE, TOKYO AND JERUSALEM (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
An in-depth analysis of the great cities of the world with an emphasis on the more important political, economic, social, artistic, and cultural aspects. Cities to be studied are Florence, Tokyo and Jerusalem. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

HIST 464 GREAT CITIES OF THE WORLD: NEW YORK, BEIJING AND GRANADA (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
An in-depth analysis of the great cities of the world with an emphasis on the more important political, economic, social, artistic and cultural aspects. Cities to be studied are New York, Beijing and Granada. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).


HSCI 100 GENERAL HEALTH SCIENCE (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A broad and comprehensive survey of factors that influence individual and community health. Examines the interaction between personal health choices & behaviors, social determinants of health, and environmental influences in community and personal health. Topics include chronic diseases, health disparities, mental health, drugs and addiction, stress management, sexual health, nutrition, exercise, healthcare systems and services, alternative medicine, grief and loss, and environmental health.  Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E1).


HSCI 130 HUMAN SEXUALITY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Students explore and expand their understanding about the biological, interpersonal and socio-cultural dimensions of sex and sexuality. Topics include anatomy and physiology; psychosexual development; dating and relationships; gender expression; sexual orientations; pregnancy, childbirth and parenting; contraceptive methods; sexually transmitted infections; pleasure, arousal and sexual behavior; sexual violence and exploitation; commercial sex work; myths and misconceptions; and communication skills.  Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E1).

HSCI 150 DEATH AND DYING (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

Course is designed to increase the knowledge, the understanding, and the coping with the problems of death and dying. Transfer credit: CSU (E1).


HSCI 180 GATEWAY TO HEALTH CAREERS (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.
Introduction of skills, attributes and basic knowledge required for entry into various health care professions. Includes basic assessment, CPR, and math calculations used in health care. Emphasis on providing a foundation for future health career courses. Also listed as EMC. 180. Transfer credit: CSU.


HSCI 314 HEALTH, SAFETY AND NUTRITION FOR YOUNG CHILDREN (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
@9/11.5:Introduction to the laws, regulations, standards, policies, procedures and early childhood education curriculum related to child health safety and nutrition. The key components that ensure physical health, mental health and safety for both children and staff will be identified along with the importance of collaboration with families and health professionals. Focus on integrating the concepts into everyday planning and program development for all children. <I>Also listed as ECE. 314. Transfer credit: CSU.<I>

HSCI 405 EMERGENCY CARE FOR FIRST RESPONDERS (3)

Three class hours per week.

Develops manipulative and problem solving skills necessary for the initial evaluation and stabilization of victims of emergency illness or trauma. Designed for persons who are interested in a career as a first responder to medical emergencies. Upon completion, student receives CPR and First Responder certificates.


HSCI 420 EKG TECHNOLOGY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester and one eight-hour day in an EKG Department. Prerequisite: A valid Health Care Provider CPR Card.
Review of cardiovascular anatomy and physiology with emphasis on electro physiology. Interpretation of the normal and abnormal electrocardiogram. Laboratory and clinical site practice running a 12 lead EKG.

HSCI 435 PHARMACY TECHNICIAN TRAINING (11)

A total of 189 lecture hours plus two hours per week by arrangement. Recommended: Completion of ENGL 826 and READ 826 with grades of C or better, or equivalent; completion of MATH 811 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent; and completion of or concurrent enrollment in CAOT 100, or the ability to word process at 20 wpm.

Introductory course in Pharmacy Technician Training. Topics include pharmacy practices and settings, duties of pharmacy technicians, laws and regulations, medical terms and calculations, drug identification, storage and dispensing, and drug packaging and labeling. Transfer credit: CSU.

HSCI 436 PHARMACY TECHNICIAN TRAINING CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP (1.5)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A total of 96 clinical hours plus two hours per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: Completion of HSCI 435 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent; and negative result to an 8-12 panel drug screen test.

Introductory training in a clinical pharmacy setting. Training may be completed in a hospital or retail pharmacy. Students will perform the duties and functions of a pharmacy technician under the supervision of a licensed pharmacist or registered pharmacy technician. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: CSU.


HSCI 484 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Designed to give students a basic background in medical terminology as used by medical transcriptionists, court reporters, law related occupations, and allied health occupations. The prefixes, roots, and suffixes of commonly used medical words are presented. Proper names of anatomical structures and their relationship to each other are covered by body system. Also listed as BUS. 485. Transfer credit: CSU.


HSCI 665 LIFE STYLES – HEALTH ISSUES (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours for each .5 unit. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Explores contemporary topics or life styles as they relate to the health of individuals or society. Transfer credit: CSU (E1).

GATEWAY TO HEALTH CAREERS (3.0) An introductory course to prepare and/or interest students who may seek a career in health care. Includes basic assessment, CPR, and math calculations used in health care. Transfer: CSU.
HTM. 130 FOOD AND BEVERAGE/RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.

Techniques and procedures of management are explored and developed as they relate to commercial and institutional food and beverage facilities. Topics include functions of management, marketing, menu development, effective cost control in purchasing, pricing, labor, and service techniques. Transfer credit: CSU.

HTM. 130 FOOD AND BEVERAGE/RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.

Techniques and procedures of management are explored and developed as they relate to commercial and institutional food and beverage facilities. Topics include functions of management, marketing, menu development, effective cost control in purchasing, pricing, labor, and service techniques. Transfer credit: CSU.

HTM. 231 FOOD, BEVERAGE, AND LABOR COST CONTROLS (3)

Minimum of 48.0 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Gain the necessary knowledge and skills required to manage and make intelligent business decisions within a food and beverage operation or department, with a focus on standards determination; variable, semi-variable and fixed costs; the operating budget; income and cost control; and menu pricing. Transfer credit: CSU.

HTM. 231 FOOD, BEVERAGE, AND LABOR COST CONTROLS (3)

Minimum of 48.0 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Gain the necessary knowledge and skills required to manage and make intelligent business decisions within a food and beverage operation or department, with a focus on standards determination; variable, semi-variable and fixed costs; the operating budget; income and cost control; and menu pricing. Transfer credit: CSU.


HUM. 106 THE AWAKENING OF INDIVIDUALITY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An interdisciplinary exploration of individuality and self-reliance aimed at creating greater self-awareness and critical thinking. Various concepts of individuality are explored along with an examination of trends which destroy it. Creative alternatives aimed at increasing individuality are developed. Partially fulfills general education requirements in the Humanities. Transfer credit: CSU (C2).


HUM. 106 THE AWAKENING OF INDIVIDUALITY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An interdisciplinary exploration of individuality and self-reliance aimed at creating greater self-awareness and critical thinking. Various concepts of individuality are explored along with an examination of trends which destroy it. Creative alternatives aimed at increasing individuality are developed. Partially fulfills general education requirements in the Humanities. Transfer credit: CSU (C2).

HUM. 115 INTRODUCTION TO THE ARTS ' LIVE! (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus attendance of six to eight events. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

A broad survey of the arts including music, dance, theater, films, and visual arts with an emphasis on developing arts appreciation both in theory and through attendance and critiques of live performances and exhibits. Partially satisfies the general education requirement in the area of the Humanities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

HUM. 115 INTRODUCTION TO THE ARTS ' LIVE! (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus attendance of six to eight events. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

A broad survey of the arts including music, dance, theater, films, and visual arts with an emphasis on developing arts appreciation both in theory and through attendance and critiques of live performances and exhibits. Partially satisfies the general education requirement in the area of the Humanities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

HUM. 116 CHILDREN'S ARTS APPRECIATION (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

General survey of art forms for children with an emphasis on arts appreciation. Children's literature, music, art, dance, theater, and film will be discussed and analyzed. Opportunities for exploring children's arts in the Bay Area will be identified. Partially fulfills the general education requirement in the Humanities. Transfer credit: CSU (C2).

HUM. 116 CHILDREN'S ARTS APPRECIATION (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

General survey of art forms for children with an emphasis on arts appreciation. Children's literature, music, art, dance, theater, and film will be discussed and analyzed. Opportunities for exploring children's arts in the Bay Area will be identified. Partially fulfills the general education requirement in the Humanities. Transfer credit: CSU (C2).

HUM. 117 THE ARTS, THE SENSES AND THE IMAGINATION (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

Exploration and development of skills necessary for arts appreciation. Promotes growth in the areas of sensory awareness, perception, discrimination, interpretation of meaning in works of art, and the importance of the arts in society. Areas of study selected from film, music, poetry, fiction, architecture, painting, drawing, dance, drama, and domestic arts. Partially satisfies general education requirement in the area of the humanities for the Associate Degree. Transfer credit: CSU (C1).

HUM. 117 THE ARTS, THE SENSES AND THE IMAGINATION (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

Exploration and development of skills necessary for arts appreciation. Promotes growth in the areas of sensory awareness, perception, discrimination, interpretation of meaning in works of art, and the importance of the arts in society. Areas of study selected from film, music, poetry, fiction, architecture, painting, drawing, dance, drama, and domestic arts. Partially satisfies general education requirement in the area of the humanities for the Associate Degree. Transfer credit: CSU (C1).

INDV 101.1 ARCHERY I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Introduction to target archery including technique practice and application, scoring at a beginning level, vocabulary, and care and selection of equipment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 101.1 ARCHERY I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Introduction to target archery including technique practice and application, scoring at a beginning level, vocabulary, and care and selection of equipment. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 101.2 ARCHERY II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continuing instruction in the sport of target archery. Includes further technique instruction, use of a bow sight, scoring, care of a bow and arrows, and vocabulary. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 101.2 ARCHERY II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continuing instruction in the sport of target archery. Includes further technique instruction, use of a bow sight, scoring, care of a bow and arrows, and vocabulary. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 101.3 ARCHERY III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continuing instruction in the sport of target archery. Includes advanced intermediate technique and bow sight instruction, scoring, care of a bow and arrows, vocabulary and competition. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 101.3 ARCHERY III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continuing instruction in the sport of target archery. Includes advanced intermediate technique and bow sight instruction, scoring, care of a bow and arrows, vocabulary and competition. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 101.4 ARCHERY IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continuing instruction in the sport of target archery. Includes advanced technique instruction, scoring, vocabulary and competition. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 101.4 ARCHERY IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continuing instruction in the sport of target archery. Includes advanced technique instruction, scoring, vocabulary and competition. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 121.1 BADMINTON I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Rules and beginning strategies of badminton; instruction and practice in fundamentals of grip, strokes, footwork, and court coverage, drills and competition, tournaments in singles and doubles. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 121.1 BADMINTON I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Rules and beginning strategies of badminton; instruction and practice in fundamentals of grip, strokes, footwork, and court coverage, drills and competition, tournaments in singles and doubles. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 121.2 BADMINTON II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Rules and strategies of intermediate badminton; instruction and further practice in grips, strokes, footwork, and court coverage, drills and competition, tournaments in singles and doubles. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 121.2 BADMINTON II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Rules and strategies of intermediate badminton; instruction and further practice in grips, strokes, footwork, and court coverage, drills and competition, tournaments in singles and doubles. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 121.3 BADMINTON III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced intermediate instruction with an emphasis on strategy, footwork, doubles team work, and singles game. Tournament play in singles and doubles. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 121.3 BADMINTON III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced intermediate instruction with an emphasis on strategy, footwork, doubles team work, and singles game. Tournament play in singles and doubles. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 121.4 BADMINTON IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced instruction with an emphasis on strategy, footwork, doubles team work, and singles game. Tournament play in singles and doubles. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 121.4 BADMINTON IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Advanced instruction with an emphasis on strategy, footwork, doubles team work, and singles game. Tournament play in singles and doubles. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 126 COED CLUB BADMINTON (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: INDV 121 or equivalent.

Coed class which prepares students for badminton competition through drills and physical training; in class competition. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 126 COED CLUB BADMINTON (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: INDV 121 or equivalent.

Coed class which prepares students for badminton competition through drills and physical training; in class competition. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 141 BOWLING (.5 or 1 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24, 48 or 96 class hours.

Instruction and practice in the fundamental skills of stance, approach, release and roll as related to bowling. The study of rules, etiquette and scoring will also be covered. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

INDV 141 BOWLING (.5 or 1 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A minimum of 24, 48 or 96 class hours.

Instruction and practice in the fundamental skills of stance, approach, release and roll as related to bowling. The study of rules, etiquette and scoring will also be covered. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU (E2).

INDV 160.1 GOLF I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Techniques, rules, etiquette, and strategy for beginning golf instruction. Practical experience associated with grip, stance, swings relative to iron and wood shots at a beginning level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 160.1 GOLF I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Techniques, rules, etiquette, and strategy for beginning golf instruction. Practical experience associated with grip, stance, swings relative to iron and wood shots at a beginning level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 160.2 GOLF II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Technique, rules, etiquette, and strategy for intermediate golf instruction. Practical experience associated with grip, stance, swings relative to iron and wood shots at an intermediate level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 160.2 GOLF II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Technique, rules, etiquette, and strategy for intermediate golf instruction. Practical experience associated with grip, stance, swings relative to iron and wood shots at an intermediate level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 160.3 GOLF III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Technique, rules, etiquette, and strategy for advanced intermediate golf instruction. Practical experience associated with grip, stance, swings relative to iron and wood shots at an advanced intermediate level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 160.3 GOLF III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Technique, rules, etiquette, and strategy for advanced intermediate golf instruction. Practical experience associated with grip, stance, swings relative to iron and wood shots at an advanced intermediate level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 160.4 GOLF IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Technique, rules, etiquette, and strategy for advanced golf instruction. Practical experience associated with grip, stance, swings relative to iron and wood shots at an advanced level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 160.4 GOLF IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Technique, rules, etiquette, and strategy for advanced golf instruction. Practical experience associated with grip, stance, swings relative to iron and wood shots at an advanced level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 165.1 GOLF: SHORT GAME I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Introduces pitching, chipping, putting and greenside bunker play at a beginning level. Class will be held both at a practice facility and at a nine-hole golf course for practical application of skills. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 165.1 GOLF: SHORT GAME I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Introduces pitching, chipping, putting and greenside bunker play at a beginning level. Class will be held both at a practice facility and at a nine-hole golf course for practical application of skills. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 165.2 GOLF: SHORT GAME II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

At an intermediate level, skill improvement on pitching, chipping, putting and greenside bunker play. Class will be held both at a practice facility and at a nine-hole golf course for practical application of skills. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 165.2 GOLF: SHORT GAME II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

At an intermediate level, skill improvement on pitching, chipping, putting and greenside bunker play. Class will be held both at a practice facility and at a nine-hole golf course for practical application of skills. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 165.3 GOLF: SHORT GAME III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

At an advanced intermediate level, skill improvement on pitching, chipping, putting and greenside bunker play. Class will be held both at a practice facility and at a nine-hole golf course for practical application of skills. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 165.3 GOLF: SHORT GAME III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

At an advanced intermediate level, skill improvement on pitching, chipping, putting and greenside bunker play. Class will be held both at a practice facility and at a nine-hole golf course for practical application of skills. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 165.4 GOLF: SHORT GAME IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

At an advanced level, skill improvement on pitching, chipping, putting and greenside bunker play. Class will be held both at a practice facility and at a nine-hole golf course for practical application of skills. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 165.4 GOLF: SHORT GAME IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

At an advanced level, skill improvement on pitching, chipping, putting and greenside bunker play. Class will be held both at a practice facility and at a nine-hole golf course for practical application of skills. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 167 GOLF COURSE STRATEGIES (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: INDV 160 or equivalent.

Designed for students who have established skills in golf who want to play competitively and develop a handicap with the Northern California Golf Association. Students will participate in structured play and learn numerous aspects of golf strategy, scoring and golf course management. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 167 GOLF COURSE STRATEGIES (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: INDV 160 or equivalent.

Designed for students who have established skills in golf who want to play competitively and develop a handicap with the Northern California Golf Association. Students will participate in structured play and learn numerous aspects of golf strategy, scoring and golf course management. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 168 TOURNAMENT GOLF (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: INDV 160, INDV 165 or INDV 167, or equivalent.

Emphasis on preparation for tournament golf. Includes an overview of rules pertaining to stroke play and match play tournaments, etiquette, and strategies of tournament play. Includes drills and instruction for skill improvement and an emphasis on tournament play at local nine hole courses. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 168 TOURNAMENT GOLF (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: INDV 160, INDV 165 or INDV 167, or equivalent.

Emphasis on preparation for tournament golf. Includes an overview of rules pertaining to stroke play and match play tournaments, etiquette, and strategies of tournament play. Includes drills and instruction for skill improvement and an emphasis on tournament play at local nine hole courses. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 172 GOLF: IMPROVING THE MENTAL GAME (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: Successful completion of INDV 160, or equivalent.

An introduction to various mental tools to improve one’s performance on the golf course. Includes visualization, anxiety management, goal setting, positive affirmations, overcoming self-fulfilling negative thought processes, and more. Course will include practical application in drills and in on-course tournament play. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 172 GOLF: IMPROVING THE MENTAL GAME (.5 or 1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 or 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: Successful completion of INDV 160, or equivalent.

An introduction to various mental tools to improve one’s performance on the golf course. Includes visualization, anxiety management, goal setting, positive affirmations, overcoming self-fulfilling negative thought processes, and more. Course will include practical application in drills and in on-course tournament play. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 251.1 TENNIS I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction in the fundamental skills of the service, forehand and the backhand strokes; court strategy and the rules of play; testing program in all tennis skills and rules. Includes use of automatic ball machine. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 251.1 TENNIS I (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Instruction in the fundamental skills of the service, forehand and the backhand strokes; court strategy and the rules of play; testing program in all tennis skills and rules. Includes use of automatic ball machine. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 251.2 TENNIS II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continued instruction in the fundamental skills of tennis. Emphasis will be placed on singles and doubles strategy including the essence of net play at the intermediate level. Forehand, backhand, and serve will be emphasized as offensive and defensive weapons. Competition will be included and tournaments will be held. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 251.2 TENNIS II (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continued instruction in the fundamental skills of tennis. Emphasis will be placed on singles and doubles strategy including the essence of net play at the intermediate level. Forehand, backhand, and serve will be emphasized as offensive and defensive weapons. Competition will be included and tournaments will be held. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 251.3 TENNIS III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continued instruction on the skills of tennis at the advanced intermediate level. Emphasis will be placed on singles and doubles strategy including net play. Forehand, backhand, and serve will be emphasized as offensive and defensive weapons. Competition will be included and tournaments will be held. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 251.3 TENNIS III (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continued instruction on the skills of tennis at the advanced intermediate level. Emphasis will be placed on singles and doubles strategy including net play. Forehand, backhand, and serve will be emphasized as offensive and defensive weapons. Competition will be included and tournaments will be held. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 251.4 TENNIS IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continued instruction on the skills of tennis at the advanced level. Emphasis will be placed on singles and doubles strategy including net play. Forehand, backhand, and serve will be emphasized as offensive and defensive weapons. Competition will be included and tournaments will be held. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).

INDV 251.4 TENNIS IV (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24, 48, 72 or 96 lab hours/semester.

Continued instruction on the skills of tennis at the advanced level. Emphasis will be placed on singles and doubles strategy including net play. Forehand, backhand, and serve will be emphasized as offensive and defensive weapons. Competition will be included and tournaments will be held. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E2).


INTD 110 ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.
Detailed studies of the home’s interior environment. Selection and arrangement of furnishing; principles and elements of design as they relate to the selection and coordination of the home furnishings and accessories. Transfer credit: CSU (C1).

INTD 120 DESIGNING INTERIORS FOR MULTICULTURAL POPULATIONS (3)

Three lecture hours per week.

Detailed studies of the home's interior environment with an emphasis on the influences of Asian and Latin American cultures, as well as other cultures, on Western interior design; the cultural preferences of members of these cultures living in a Western society will be emphasized. Transfer credit: CSU (C1).

ITAL 103 ITALIAN FOR TRAVELERS (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement.

This course will assist travelers to Italian-speaking locales to learn basic Italian commonly heard in travel contexts. Students will learn basic grammar; acquire relevant vocabulary, phrases and expressions used in traveling; and will improve listening comprehension. Transfer credit: CSU.

ITAL 111 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I ((3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

The first course in a basic two-semester sequence for native and nonnative students. The course covers approximately the same material studied in the first half of a university-level first semester Italian course. Students will acquire a basic ability to speak, read and write in Italian at the elementary level and will learn about the customs, culture and history of the Italian world. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2). (ITAL 111 + ITAL 112 = CAN ITAL 2).

ITAL 112 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: ITAL 111 or equivalent.

The second course in a basic two-semester sequence for native and nonnative students. The course covers approximately the same material studied in the second half of a university-level first semester Italian course. Students will acquire a basic ability to speak, read and write in Italian at the elementary level and will learn about the customs, culture and history of the Italian world.Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2). (ITAL 111 + ITAL 112 = CAN ITAL 2).

ITAL 121 ADVANCED ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: ITAL 112 or equivalent.

The first course in an advanced elementary two-semester sequence for native and nonnative students. The course covers approximately the same material studied in the first half of a university-level second semester Italian course. Students will acquire a basic ability to speak, read and write in Italian at the advanced elementary level and will learn about the customs, culture and history of the Italian world. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2). (ITAL 121 + ITAL 122 = CAN ITAL 4).

ITAL 122 ADVANCED ELEMENTARY ITALIAN II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: ITAL 121 or equivalent.

The second course in an advanced elementary two-semester sequence for native and nonnative students. The course covers approximately the same material studied in the second half of a university-level second semester Italian course. Students will acquire a basic ability to speak, read and write in Italian at the advanced elementary level and will learn about the customs, culture and history of the Italian world. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2). (ITAL 121 + ITAL 122 = CAN ITAL 4).

JAPN 111 ELEMENTARY JAPANESE I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

The first course in a two-semester sequence covering the same course material as a university-level first semester. The student will acquire the ability to speak, read and write in the Japanese language at an elementary level and understand Japanese culture at a basic level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

JAPN 111 ELEMENTARY JAPANESE I (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

The first course in a two-semester sequence covering the same course material as a university-level first semester. The student will acquire the ability to speak, read and write in the Japanese language at an elementary level and understand Japanese culture at a basic level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

JAPN 112 ELEMENTARY JAPANESE II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: JAPN 111 or equivalent.

The second course in a two-semester sequence covering the same course material as a university-level first semester. The student will acquire the ability to speak, read and write in the Japanese language at an elementary level and understand Japanese culture at a basic level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

JAPN 112 ELEMENTARY JAPANESE II (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement. Prerequisite: JAPN 111 or equivalent.

The second course in a two-semester sequence covering the same course material as a university-level first semester. The student will acquire the ability to speak, read and write in the Japanese language at an elementary level and understand Japanese culture at a basic level. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

JAPN 115 BASIC BUSINESS JAPANESE (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement.

Designed to help students learn Japanese for business purposes. Students will acquire relevant vocabulary, phrases and expressions, and will improve listening comprehension. The learner, regardless of language level in Japanese, will become familiar with questions and responses commonly heard in Japanese business contexts. Transfer credit: CSU.

JAPN 115 BASIC BUSINESS JAPANESE (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week plus one lab hour per week by arrangement.

Designed to help students learn Japanese for business purposes. Students will acquire relevant vocabulary, phrases and expressions, and will improve listening comprehension. The learner, regardless of language level in Japanese, will become familiar with questions and responses commonly heard in Japanese business contexts. Transfer credit: CSU.


JOUR 110 MASS MEDIA AND SOCIETY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A general-interest survey course that provides a historical and theoretical perspective through which to assess the impact the mass media – newspapers, magazines, the Internet, radio, television, film, adverting, and public relations – have had on society. Students will learn about the rights and responsibilities of the media, as well as the way in which economic, ethical and legal concerns influence media decisions. The course trains students to become discerning media consumers in this information-saturated age. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


JOUR 120 WRITING AND REPORTING FOR THE MEDIA (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Fundamentals of news writing and reporting, including organization of basic news stories, lead writing, development of sources, interviewing, news judgment, copy editing, and legal/ethical issues. Designed for students interested in a career in journalism or mass communications, as well as those seeking better writing skills. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


JOUR 121 ADVANCED WRITING AND REPORTING FOR THE MEDIA (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: Completion of JOUR 120, or equivalent.
Focus on advanced reporting skills and convergence journalism, including conveying news stories through more than text. Students enhance their reporting and news writing by cultivating a beat, using the Web and databases, supplementing text with audio and video, creating podcasts, and blogging. Designed to prepare students for the converging worlds of print, broadcast and online journalism. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


JOUR 300 NEWSPAPER STAFF (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent. Recommended: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in JOUR 120.
Production of the college newspaper. Discussion and criticism by staff of the publication. Students will get practical experience in writing as preparation for future print and electronic media work. Transfer credit: CSU.

JOUR 301 ONLINE NEWSPAPER STAFF (3)

Three lecture hours and three lab hours by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent. Recommended: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in JOUR 120.

Production of the online version of the college newspaper. Discussion and criticism by staff of the publication. Students will get practical experience in writing for an online publication, including using digital photography, video and audio clips for story enhancement. The course prepares students for future print and electronic media work. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

JOUR 302 NEWSPAPER WORKSHOP (1-3)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A minimum of 48 lab hours per unit. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 836 or ESOL 400, or equivalent. Recommended: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in JOUR 120 or JOUR 121.

Participants perform a variety of activities for The Skyline View newspaper, including writing, taking photos or video, blogging, creating podcasts, selling ads, laying out the paper, marketing the paper and journalism program, or participating in any other activity pertinent to the production of the print and online versions of the paper. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.


JOUR 320 BEGINNING NEWSPAPER STAFF (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 48 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Focus on the production of the student news publications, including the print newspaper, The Skyline View, its online version, TheSkylineView.com, and all other media platforms through which content is expressed. Students concentrate their work in one of the following: report, write and edit articles for the print and online versions of The Skyline View; take and edit photographs; research for and create informational graphics; develop multimedia stories; design and layout pages of the print newspaper, including in-house advertising; post to and maintain social media sites. Ethical and legal issues are also covered. Transfer: CSU.

JOUR 330 INTERMEDIATE NEWSPAPER STAFF (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 48 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite:  JOUR 320 or equivalent.
Focus on the production of the student news publications, including the print newspaper, The Skyline View, its online version, TheSkylineView.com, and all other media platforms through which content is expressed. Students take a leadership or management role on the paper, while they also concentrate their work in one of the following: report, write and edit articles for the print and online versions of The Skyline View; take and edit photographs; research for and create informational graphics; develop multimedia stories; design and layout pages of the print newspaper, including in-house advertising; post to and maintain social media sites. Ethical and legal issues are also covered. Transfer: CSU.

JOUR 340 INTERMEDIATE ADVANCED NEWSPAPER STAFF (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 48 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: JOUR 330 or equivalent.
Focus on the production of the student news publications, including the print newspaper, The Skyline View, its online version, TheSkylineView.com, and all other media platforms through which content is expressed. Students take a training and leadership or management role on the paper, while they also concentrate their work in one of the following: report, write and edit articles for the print and online versions of The Skyline View; take and edit photographs; research for and create informational graphics; develop multimedia stories; design and layout pages of the print newspaper, including in-house advertising; post to and maintain social media sites. Ethical and legal issues are also covered. Transfer credit: CSU.

JOUR 350 ADVANCED NEWSPAPER STAFF (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 48 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: JOUR 340 or equivalent.

Focus on the production of the student news publications, including the print newspaper, The Skyline View, its online version, TheSkylineView.com, and all other media platforms through which content is expressed. Students take a training and leadership or management role on the paper. They also do advanced reporting for the paper in one of the following areas: investigative and in-depth stories, public affairs reporting; or data-driven reporting. Students also coordinate one special add-on section for the newspaper. Transfer credit: CSU.

JOUR 695 INDEPENDENT STUDY (.5-3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 24 lab hours by arrangement for each .5 unit. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Designed for students who are interested in furthering their knowledge via self-paced, individualized instruction provided in selected areas or directed study to be arranged with instructor and approved by the division dean using the Independent Study Form. Varying modes of instruction can be used -- laboratory, research, skill development, etc. For each unit earned, students are required to devote three hours per week throughout the semester. Students may take only one Independent Study course within a given discipline. Transfer credit: CSU.

KINE 100 INTRODUCTION TO KINESIOLOGY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.

Exploration of the broad spectrum of kinesiology as an academic discipline, fundamental concepts and meaning of movement/physical activity, diversity of humans as moving beings, professional/career options, current/social issues, personal characteristics/professional responsibilities. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. Transfer credit: CSU.

LEGL 240 INTRODUCTION TO LAW (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
The study of law, the legal profession and the court system. Emphasis is on the roles and relationships of workers in the American legal system. Some attention to administrative agency justice and to recent developments in legal services, law-related management, and new technology. Recommended for students considering work in law-related occupations. Transfer credit: CSU.


LEGL 245 LEGAL OPERATIONS (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
This course is designed to expose students to the variety of law-related job opportunities and many of the skills necessary to per-form those jobs, such as legal analysis, terminology, interviewing, investigation, litigation, law office management, and informal and formal advocacy before administrative agencies. Transfer credit: CSU.


LEGL 250 LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
The course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of major resources in the law library. Includes practice in finding and interpreting case law, statutes and administrative regulations. Student is given experience in using digests, looseleaf services, citators, encyclopedias, treatises and legal periodicals. Transfer credit: CSU.


LEGL 252 PRINCIPLES OF CIVIL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCESS (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.An in-depth study of case processing in civil and administrative matters.
An emphasis on the systems approach and origin-to-disposition studies of typical civil and administrative matters. Especially helpful for students enrolled in the courts option, the legal secretary, or legal assistant programs. Transfer credit: CSU.


LEGL 260 ADVANCED LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: LEGL 250.
Build legal research and writing skills by preparing a series of projects, including documents for real cases. Students will polish writing skills so that they can prepare professional high quality documents and effectively communicate legal ideas. Transfer credit: CSU.

LEGL 265 LABOR LAW AND COLLECTIVE BARGAINING (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

A survey course examining the role of labor in the American community. Specific course content will include the history of the labor movement, administration of labor unions, contemporary labor law, and an analysis of the collective bargaining process. Scope is expanded to include public sector labor relations as well as its traditional private sector counterpart. Transfer credit: CSU.

LEGL 266 PROBATES, ESTATES, AND TRUSTS (1 or 3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: One or more law related courses completed or taken concurrently and eligibility for ENGL 836.

A study of the fundamental principles of the law of wills and trusts, the administration of estates, and gift, inheritance and estate taxes. Transfer credit: CSU.


LEGL 304 CONCEPTS OF CRIMINAL LAW (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Completion  of, or concurrent enrollment in, LEGL 240 or ADMJ 100, or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Historical development and philosophy of criminal law and constitutional provisions. Special emphasis on legal definitions, the classifications of crime and their application to the administration of justice system. Study of case law, methodology, and concepts of law as a social force. Also listed as ADMJ 104. Transfer credit: CSU.

LEGL 305 JUDICIAL PROCESS IN CALIFORNIA (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836.

An overview of the federal court system, the California courts, and administrative agency tribunals. Careful examination of roles and relationships of the courthouse work group. Also listed as ADMJ 205. Transfer credit: CSU.


LEGL 306 LEGAL ASPECTS OF EVIDENCE (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Completion  of, or concurrent enrollment in, LEGL 240 or ADMJ 100, or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Origin, development, philosophy and constitutional basis of evidence; constitutional and procedural considerations affecting arrest, search and seizure; kinds and degrees of evidence and rules governing admissibility; judicial decisions and interpreting individual rights and case studies. Also listed as ADMJ 106. Transfer credit: CSU.


LEGL 320 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Completion  of, or concurrent enrollment in, LEGL 240 or ADMJ 100, or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A course designed for introductory and in-service Administration of Justice students to provide orientation to general and specific aspects of crimes and detection. The course will also cover crime scene searches and suspect apprehension. Also listed as ADMJ 120. Transfer credit: CSU.


LEGL 443 LAW OFFICE PROCEDURES (1-3)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 24 lab hours by arrangement for each unit. Prerequisites: BCM. 212 or 214 and BUS. 400 or equivalent skills. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Intensive training in procedures applicable to secretarial duties in law offices. Emphasis on legal terminology, legal documents and correspondence, dictation, and transcription. Also listed as BUS. 443. Transfer credit: CSU.


LEGL 445 LAW OFFICE MANAGEMENT (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: BCM. 214, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Introduction to the fundamentals of law office administration, personnel management, and accounting operations. Designed to familiarize legal paraprofessionals (legal secretaries, paralegals and law office clerks) with the practical inner workings of a law office, including an understanding of law office fundamentals. Law office management goes beyond analyzing mere productivity and includes being sensitive to ethical concerns and providing quality legal services to clients.  Also listed as BUS. 445. Transfer credit: CSU.


LEGL 671 PARALEGAL INTERNSHIP I (4)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 75 volunteer work hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent. Students are strongly advised to complete or enroll concurrently in LEGL 443 or LEGL 445.
Paralegal students gain practical hands-on experience through unpaid volunteer internships at public and private legal organizations. Internships bridge classroom learning with real world experience and offer students professional career development. Interns are supervised on-site by professional legal personnel and off site by a paralegal instructor.  Transfer credit: CSU.

LIT. 101 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Students read, interpret and analyze a representative selection of contemporary literary fiction, poetry and drama since WWII using some of the major theoretical approaches to literature. These readings offer not only a greater critical perspective and insight into contemporary history, but an enhanced understanding of ourselves within our own culture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

LIT. 111 SHORT STORY (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 105, or equivalent.

Reading, discussing, and writing about a diverse selection of classic and contemporary short fiction. Exploration of a spectrum of voices, styles, formal structures and themes will lead to an understanding and appreciation of stories from different cultures and perspectives. Independent study will encourage in-depth reading of the work of one author. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

LIT. 113 INTRODUCTION TO THE NOVEL (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 105, or equivalent.

Reading, discussing and writing about novels, classic and contemporary. The novel form provides in-depth exploration of characters and ideas and the entry into elaborate imaginative and intellectual worlds. Students will experience a variety of voices, writing styles and cultural perspectives while studying the literary techniques employed by novelists. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

LIT. 116 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD LITERATURE (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 105, or equivalent.

A sampling of world literature, from classic to modern. Students will examine how fiction, poetry, essays and plays are used to express both universal and regional concerns and the human struggle common to all of us. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

LIT. 151 SHAKESPEARE (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Study of representative plays and poems, with an emphasis on Shakespeare’s poetic and dramatic skills and his understanding of human nature. Reading, discussion, critical papers. Students will understand Shakespeare’s role in the development of English language and literature. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

LIT. 166 WOMEN ON WRITING (.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

A total of eight lecture hours.

Exploration of diverse women's experience as portrayed in a variety of genres. Students will read, hear from and discuss women authors who write in such modes as the novel, short story, poetry, drama, film, news reporting and editorial comment, memoir, biography, and historical fiction. Course participants will examine and celebrate women's voices in contemporary writing. Also listed as ENGL 166. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 3 units. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


LIT. 191 CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An overview of the body of world literature deemed appropriate and enriching for children from infancy to adolescence. Designed to impart knowledge about and practice in storytelling techniques, as well as practical experience in presenting age-appropriate literature to children and youth. Theory and practice in discerning literary genres, criteria for selection, and techniques for using classic and contemporary literature with young people. Also listed as ECE. 191. Transfer credit: CSU (C2).


LIT. 201 AMERICAN LITERATURE I (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Study of American Literature from the European conquest of the Americas through the 18th and 19th centuries. Lectures, discussions, reading of primary and secondary works, and writing of critical papers. Transfer credit: CSU (C2).

LIT. 225 MIRRORS OF TODAY: CONTEMPORARY POETRY (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 105, or equivalent.

The poetry of the last quarter of the twentieth century is both a product of and a reaction against our 'postmodern condition.'' This course, by situating major examples of this poetry in the relevant social, intellectual, and critical contexts, clarifies the meaning and methods of contemporary poetry in English. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).


LIT. 251 WOMEN IN LITERATURE (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A study of the historical, sociopolitical and cultural concerns of women as these appear in novels, short stories, and poetry. A glimpse into the struggle for self-identity and the forces that interact in the course of this struggle. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).


LIT. 265 ASIAN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A survey of Asian American literature will acquaint students with the distinct literary and aesthetic qualities and the personal and cultural concerns of American writers of Asian descent. Authors may include Chinese Americans, Japanese Americans, Vietnamese Americans, Pacific Islanders, Korean Americans, Southeast Asian Americans, and Indian Americans. Material will be presented in a variety of genres. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

LIT. 266 BLACK LITERATURE (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A survey of Black American literature from 1619 to the present. Literature such as autobiographical works, poetry, short stories, drama, folk tales, novellas, and novels will be included to introduce and explore the qualities of Black American writing. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).


LIT. 267 FILIPINO AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A survey of Filipino American writing of the twentieth century will acquaint students with the issues that these American writers of Filipino descent address as they move between different societies. The literature reflects the unique background of shared language and history, as well as the contrasts between the cultures of the Philippines and the United States. Material will be presented in a variety of genres. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).


LIT. 370 READINGS IN LITERATURE OF THE LATINO IN THE UNITED STATES (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A study of the historical, sociopolitical, and cultural concerns of Latinos in the U.S. as these appear in novels, short stories, and poetry. A glimpse into the struggle for self-identity and the forces that interact in the course of this struggle. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

LIT. 373 LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 105, or equivalent.

Latin America's innovative literature vividly portrays life and mores of our neighboring countries to the south. This course samples greater- and lesser-known works in translation, revealing important literary trends and themes which have been held in high esteem throughout the world. Material will be presented in a variety of genres. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

LIT. 416 MODERN EUROPEAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 105, or equivalent.

Historically, and especially today, Europe is a multicultural society with people from all regions of the world. This course may be offered as a survey of European literature or may focus on a specific region. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

LIT. 432 FOLKLORE (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 105, or equivalent.

A lively study of folk tales, legends, beliefs, superstitions, proverbs, mythology, folk life, folk speech, folk songs, lyrics, folk epics, and their influence in the literature and culture that form our heritage. Special attention will be given to folklore of various racial and ethnic groups that mold American society. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

LSCI 100 INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION RESEARCH (1)

(Offered online only.)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

One hour per week of individualized study.

An introduction to basic online research skills using a variety of high quality Web research tools. Emphasis on techniques for effective searching and using critical thinking skills to choose appropriate online research tools and critically evaluate a variety of information sources. LSCI 100 is offered in an online format. Students must have an email address. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E1).

LSCI 110 DIGITAL ORAL RESEARCH PROJECT (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

One class hour per week by arrangement.

A practical introduction to methods and techniques of gathering and documenting oral research using digital audio technology. Students will learn to interview people in order to record and organize information relevant to specific historical, social, cultural, ethnic or other areas of research interest. Completed digital oral research projects will be included in the College Library's oral history website. (Open entry.) Transfer credit: CSU.

LSCI 665 SELECTED TOPICS IN LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE (.5 or 1 or 1.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of eight lecture hours per .5 unit.

This course is designed to develop specific skills that are utilized in library research and computerized information access. The course will focus on one specific topic; for example, a specific CDROM or online database, elements of the Internet or World Wide Web, research strategies for specific discipline areas, new research methodologies, etc. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.


LSKL 109 SUPPLEMENTAL LEARNING ASSISTANCE FOR ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA (.5)
(Pass/No Pass)
Minimum of 24 lab hours. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MATH 110, MATH 111 or MATH 112.
Provides supplementary learning assistance to students enrolled in Elementary Algebra, either MATH 110, MATH 111 or MATH 112. Under the supervision of qualified faculty, course instructors reinforce concepts and skills learned in Elementary Algebra. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


LSKL 110 DIRECTED EXPERIENCE IN TUTORING (.5-3)
(Pass/No Pass.)
Minimum of 8-16 lecture hours plus 24-144 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of B in subject to be tutored and letter of recommendation from instructor in the subject area to be tutored.
This course enables students to serve as tutors and provide academic assistance to other students (learners or tutees). Student tutors help tutee study partners to: 1) understand the concepts of specific courses and 2) apply effective study skills. (Open entry.) Transfer credit: CSU.

LSKL 400 SUPPLEMENTAL LEARNING ASSISTANCE FOR ENGLISH COMPOSITION FOR NONNATIVE SPEAKERS (.5)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A minimum of 24 lab hours. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ESOL 400.

Provides supplementary learning assistance to students enrolled in ESOL 400. Under the supervision of qualified faculty, supplemental instruction leaders reinforce concepts and skills learned in ESOL 400. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree).


LSKL 800 SUPPLEMENTAL LEARNING ASSISTANCE (.5-3)

(Pass/No Pass.)
Minimum of 24 lab hours by arrangement for each .5 unit. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in another course for which the student needs academic support in order to succeed.

Students who need supplementary instruction in the course from which they were referred receive academic support to reinforce course content and bolster academic skills. Under the supervision of qualified faculty members in the Learning Center, faculty or instructional aides will provide individual and/or group instruction to improve learning in areas of assessed need. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

LSKL 801 APPLIED STUDY SKILLS ASSISTANCE (.5-3)
(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 16-96 lab hours by arrangement/semester.
This course assists students to develop the study skills necessary for successful college work. Under the supervision of the instructor and working with tutors, students will learn a variety of study techniques directed toward specific fields of study. These techniques include note taking, communication skills, outline preparation, etc. (Open entry.)  (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


LSKL 803 SUPERVISED PEER TUTORING (0)
(Noncredit.)
Hours by arrangement. Corequisite: Enrollment in a course for which academic support is needed in order for the student to succeed.
Students who need assistance in the course from which they were referred will receive academic support to reinforce course content and bolster academic skills. Under the supervision of qualified faculty in the Learning Center, peer tutors will provide individual and/or group instruction to improve learning in areas of assessed need. (Open entry). (Not applicable to the Associate Degree.)


LSKL 811 SUPPLEMENTAL LEARNING ASSISTANCE FOR FUNDAMENTALS OF MATH (.5)
(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MATH 811.
Provides supplementary learning assistance to students enrolled in MATH 811. Under the supervision of qualified faculty, course instructors reinforce concepts and skills learned in MATH 811.  (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

LSKL 820 COMPUTER-BASED INDEPENDENT STUDY (.5-3)

(Credit/No Credit.)

A minimum of 24 lab hours by arrangement per .5 unit. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in a course in which the student needs assistance.

An individualized independent study course using computers in the Learning Center as learning assistance tools to master concepts, conduct online research, prepare college papers, or demonstrate learning through class presentations. Individualized assistance is provided by staff to meet specific student learning needs in conjunction with the requirements of the college course requiring academic assistance. (Open entry). May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree).

LSKL 826 SUPPLEMENTAL LEARNING ASSISTANCE FOR BASIC WRITING SKILLS (.5)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A minimum of 24 lab hours. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 826.

Provides supplementary learning assistance to students enrolled in ENGL 826. Under the supervision of qualified faculty, course instructors reinforce concepts and skills learned in ENGL 826. May be repeated twice for credit. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree).


LSKL 828 SUPPLEMENTAL LEARNING ASSISTANCE FOR BASIC WRITING SKILLS (.5)
(Pass/No Pass)

Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 828.
Provides supplementary learning assistance to students enrolled in ENGL 828. Under the supervision of qualified faculty, course instructors reinforce concepts and skills learned in ENGL 828. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


LSKL 830 THE SENTENCE (.5)
(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of eight lecture hours/semester.
A supplemental course that focuses on the fundamentals of sentence structure so that students can write clearer, more grammatically correct sentences. Students will be able to apply the concepts learned in this course to their writing in any class. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


LSKL 831 EDITING AND PROOFREADING (.5)
(Pass/No Pass.)
Minimum of eight lecture hours/semester.
A supplemental course that focuses on teaching students to become stronger editors and proofreaders of their own writing. Students will work on error identification and strengthening skills in grammar, sentence structure, word choice, punctuation and mechanics. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


LSKL 832 SENTENCE COMBINING (.5)
(Pass/No Pass.)
Minimum of eight lecture hours/semester.
A supplemental course that focuses on providing students firm grounding in sentence-combining skills. Students will increase the clarity and sophistication of their writing by creating more complex and better-developed sentences. Course covers verbals, appositives, and adjective clauses. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

LSKL 833 MULTI-INTELLIGENT LEARNING STRATEGIES FOR READING AND WRITING (.5)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A total of eight lecture hours.

A supplemental course that focuses on teaching students about the theory of multiple intelligences so they can identify their own strongest intelligence systems and sample a variety of strategies to improve reading and writing difficulties. May be repeated twice for credit. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree).

LSKL 836 SUPPLEMENTAL LEARNING ASSISTANCE FOR WRITING DEVELOPMENT (.5)

(Pass/No Pass.)

A minimum of 24 lab hours. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 836.

Provides supplementary learning assistance to students enrolled in ENGL 836. Under the supervision of qualified faculty, course instructors reinforce concepts and skills learning in ENGL 836. May be repeated twice for credit. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)


LSKL 853 WRITING AND READING ASSISTANCE LAB (.5-3)
(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24 hours of computer lab instruction for each .5 unit.
Provides assistance in reading strategies and all stages of the writing process to students enrolled in any college course. Open daily, the lab allows students flexible drop-in hours and flexibility in instructional methods: one-to-one tutoring, writing and reading software, English practice groups, faculty-taught workshops, and online tutoring. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

LSKL 863 COMPOSITION SUPPLEMENT (.5-3)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester for each .5 unit.

Designed for students who need introductory supplementary instruction in Composition (ENGL 100) to reinforce course content and bolster academic skills. Faculty, instructional aides or peer tutors working under the supervision of qualified faculty members in the Learning Center will provide individual and/or group instruction to improve learning in areas of assessed need. Students will develop the skills needed to write essays appropriate to the transfer level. Students will develop thesis statements and use a variety of organizational strategies, academic discourse, and standard English grammar and usage. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

LSKL 864 COMPOSITION, LITERATURE AND CRITICAL THINKING SUPPLEMENT (.5-3) (Pass/No Pass.) Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester for each .5 unit. Designed for students who need supplementary instruction in English, Literature and Critical Thinking (ENGL 110) to reinforce course content and bolster academic skills. Faculty, instructional aides, or peer tutors working under the supervision of qualified faculty members in the Learning Center will provide individual and/or group instruction to improve learning in areas of assessed need. Students will develop the skills needed to interpret and employ modes of literary analysis, as well as write essays appropriate to the transfer level. Students will develop thesis statements and use a variety of organizational strategies, academic discourse, and standard English grammar and usage. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)
LSKL 872 ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA I SUPPLEMENT (.5-3) (Pass/No Pass.) Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester for each .5 unit. Designed for students who need supplementary instruction in Elementary Algebra I (MATH 111) to reinforce course content and bolster academic skills. Faculty, instructional aides, or peer tutors working under the supervision of qualified faculty members in the Learning Center will provide individual and/or group instruction to improve learning in areas of assessed need. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)
LSKL 873 ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA II SUPPLEMENT (.5-3) (Pass/No Pass.) Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester for each .5 unit. Designed for students who need supplementary instruction in Elementary Algebra II (MATH 112) to reinforce course content and bolster academic skills. Faculty, instructional aides, or peer tutors working under the supervision of qualified faculty members in the Learning Center will provide individual and/or group instruction to improve learning in areas of assessed need. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)
LSKL 874 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA I SUPPLEMENT (.5-3) (Pass/No Pass.) Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester for each .5 unit. Designed for students who need supplementary instruction in Intermediate Algebra I (MATH 122) to reinforce course content and bolster academic skills. Faculty, instructional aides, or peer tutors working under the supervision of qualified faculty members in the Learning Center will provide individual and/or group instruction to improve learning in areas of assessed need. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)
LSKL 875 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA II SUPPLEMENT (.5-3) (Pass/No Pass.) Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester for each .5 unit. Designed for students who need supplementary instruction in Intermediate Algebra II (MATH 123) to reinforce course content and bolster academic skills. Faculty, instructional aides, or peer tutors working under the supervision of qualified faculty members in the Learning Center will provide individual and/or group instruction to improve learning in areas of assessed need. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)
LSKL 876 STATISTICS SUPPLEMENT (.5-3) (Pass/No Pass.) Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester for each .5 unit. Designed for students who need supplementary instruction in Statistics (MATH 200) to reinforce course content and bolster academic skills. Faculty, instructional aides, or peer tutors working under the supervision of qualified faculty members in the Learning Center will provide individual and/or group instruction to improve learning in areas of assessed need. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)
LSKL 877 TRIGONOMETRY SUPPLEMENT (.5-3) (Pass/No Pass.) Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester for each .5 unit. Designed for students who need supplementary instruction in Trigonometry (MATH 130) to reinforce course content and bolster academic skills. Faculty, instructional aides, or peer tutors working under the supervision of qualified faculty members in the Learning Center will provide individual and/or group instruction to improve learning in areas of assessed need. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)
LSKL 878 CALCULUS I SUPPLEMENT (.5-3) (Pass/No Pass.) Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester for each .5 unit. Designed for students who need supplementary instruction in Calculus I (MATH 241) to reinforce course content and bolster academic skills. Faculty, instructional aides, or peer tutors working under the supervision of qualified faculty members in the Learning Center will provide individual and/or group instruction to improve learning in areas of assessed need. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)
LSKL 879 CALCULUS II SUPPLEMENT (.5-3) (Pass/No Pass.) Minimum of 24 lab hours/semester for each .5 unit. Designed for students who need supplementary instruction in Calculus II (MATH 242) to reinforce course content and bolster academic skills. Faculty, instructional aides, or peer tutors working under the supervision of qualified faculty members in the Learning Center will provide individual and/or group instruction to improve learning in areas of assessed need. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)
LSKL 880SB ENGLISH COMPOSITION SUPPLEMENT (.5-3)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Minimum of 24 lab hours by arrangement for each .5 unit.

Designed for students who need introductory supplementary instruction in English composition courses to reinforce course content and bolster academic skills. Faculty, instructional aides, or peer tutors working under the supervision of qualified faculty members in the Learning Center will provide individual and/or group instruction to improve learning in areas of assessed need. Students will develop the skills needed to write essays appropriate to the transfer level. Students will develop thesis statements and use a variety of organizational strategies, academic discourse, and standard English grammar and usage. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)</>

LSKL 880SC COLLEGE LEVEL INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA SUPPLEMENT (.5-3)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Designed for students who need introductory supplementary instruction in Intermediate Algebra to reinforce course content and bolster academic skills. Faculty, instructional aides, or peer tutors working under the supervision of qualified faculty members in the Learning Center will provide individual and/or group instruction to improve students’ ability to create, manipulate, and interpret mathematical models of relationships involving exponential, polynomial, radical, and rational functions. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree.)

LSKL 880SC ESOL COMPOSITION SUPPLEMENT (.5-3)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Faculty, instructional aides, or peer tutors working under the supervision of qualified faculty members in the Learning Center will work with students to apply the writing process to generate, develop and present essays at a college level of English and critically evaluate and modify their own written language to enhance personal and academic communication. (Open entry.) (Units do not count towards the Associate Degree.)>

MATH 110 ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA (5)

Five lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 806 or MATH 811 with a grade of C or better, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent.

An introduction to elementary algebra emphasizing basic algebraic concepts and those skills necessary to apply the concepts. Topics will provide an introduction to symbol manipulation and the analytical methods for solving applications problems appropriate to the introductory level. A core of mathematical topics, including real numbers, order of operations, linear equations and graphs, polynomials, and factoring will be presented.

MATH 111 ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA I (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 806 or MATH 811 with a grade of C or better, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent.

An introduction to elementary algebra emphasizing basic algebraic concepts. Topics will provide an introduction to symbol manipulation, and the analytical methods for solving applications problems appropriate to the introductory level. A core of mathematical topics, including: real numbers, order of operations, linear equations and graphs. This course is equivalent to the first half of MATH 110 ' Elementary Algebra..

MATH 112 ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA II (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 111 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.

A continued introduction to elementary algebra emphasizing basic algebraic concepts and those skills necessary to apply the concepts. Topics will continue to provide the use of symbol manipulation, and analytical methods for solving applications problems appropriate to the introductory level. The second half of the basic core of mathematical topics of elementary algebra including polynomials, rational and irrational expressions, and quadratic equations will be presented.

MATH 115 GEOMETRY (4)

Four lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 110 with grade C or better, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent.

A study of Euclidean geometry with aspects of analytic geometry, covering plane and solid figures, the Cartesian coordinate system, and using formal logic.

MATH 120 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA (5)

Five lecture hours per week plus one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 110 or MATH 112 with a grade C or better, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent.

Extension of fundamental algebraic concepts and operations, solutions of linear and quadratic equations, individually and in systems, logarithms, exponentials, radical equations, rational equations, complex numbers, and an extension of the concepts of functions. An emphasis on modeling real life situations. A TI 83 or 84 graphing calculator is required for the course.

MATH 122 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA I (3)

Three lecture hours per week plus one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 110 or MATH 112 with a grade of C or better, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent.

This course will cover all material from MATH 120. In conjunction with MATH 123, a review of elementary algebra. Extension of fundamental algebraic concepts and operations, solutions of linear and quadratic equations, individually and in systems, logarithms, determinants, radical equations, complex numbers, and introduction to functions.

MATH 123 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA II (3)

Three lecture hours per week plus one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 122 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.

This course will cover all material from MATH 120. In conjunction with MATH 122, a review of elementary algebra. Extension of fundamental algebraic concepts and operations, solutions of linear and quadratic equations, individually and in systems, logarithms, determinants, radical equations, complex numbers, and introduction to functions.

MATH 130 TRIGONOMETRY (4)

Four lecture hours per week plus one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 120 or MATH 123 with a grade of C or better, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent. Recommended: MATH 115 or equivalent.

Trigonometric functions of real numbers and angles; solution of triangles; radian measure; graphs of trigonometric functions; trigonometric equations and identities; inverse trigonometric functions; complex numbers; applications of trigonometry. A TI 83 or 84 graphing calculator is required for the course.Transfer credit: CSU (B4). (CAN MATH 8).

MATH 150 MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS (3)

Three lecture hours plus one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 120 with a grade of C or better, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent.

Intended for future elementary school teachers. Topics covered include elementary set theory, numeration, number systems and operations, and elementary number theory, with emphasis on problem solving. This is the first of a three-course math content sequence that most universities now require for teachers. The other two courses are upper-division. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B4).

MATH 153 MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS II (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 150 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.

Second semester in a two-semester sequence for elementary school teachers. Proportional reasoning (ratio, proportion, rates as functions); statistics (graphs, measures of central tendency, dispersion, normal distribution, sampling methods); probability (event/multistage experiments, odds, expected values); geometric shapes (multi-dimensional figures, congruence transformations, symmetry, tessellations); geometry measurement (systems of measurement, multi-dimensional measurements). Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B4).

MATH 190 PATH TO STATISTICS (6)

Minimum of 96 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: MATH 811 with a minimum grade of C, or appropriate score on District math placement test and other measures as appropriate.

An accelerated course to prepare students for transfer-level Statistics (MATH 200), Quantitative Reasoning (MATH 201), and Quantitative Reasoning in Psychology (PSYC 171). It covers core concepts from elementary algebra, intermediate algebra, and descriptive statistics. Topics include ratios, rates, and proportional reasoning; arithmetic reasoning using fractions, decimals and percents; evaluating expressions, solving equations, analyzing algebraic forms to understand statistical measures; use of linear, quadratic, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic functions to model bivariate data; graphical and numerical descriptive statistics for quantitative and categorical data. This course is designed for students who do not want to major in fields such as math, science, computer science, and business. Note: This course is NOT intended for students who plan to study science, technology, engineering, math, as well as business and other non-STEM majors. Students are advised to meet with a counselor to discuss whether placement in this course is appropriate for their intended major.

MATH 200 PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS (4)

Four lecture hours per week plus one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 120 or MATH 123 with a grade of C or better, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent.

Basic concepts underlying statistical methods and covers descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, estimates and sample sizes, correlation and regression, chi-square tests, analysis of variance, and nonparametric statistics. Computer analysis of statistical data is integrated into the course. Applications of statistics to business, life sciences and other areas are included. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B4). (CAN STAT 2).

MATH 201 QUANTITATIVE REASONING (3)

Three lecture hours per week plus one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 120 or MATH 123 with a grade C or better, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent.

This course develops the necessary concepts and skills for reasoning logically and quantitatively. It provides an overview, with historical perspective, of various useful and interesting facets of mathematics. It satisfies the quantitative reasoning requirement. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B4).

MATH 222 PRECALCULUS (5)

Five lecture hours per week plus one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 130 with a grade of C or better; or equivalent.

Functional and graphing approach to the concepts and skills necessary as background for success in Calculus. Study of more advanced algebra, including logic, theory of equations, translation, rotation and composition approach to graphing, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections and a brief review of trigonometry. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B4). (CAN MATH 16). @9/11.5 no indent:NOTE: The prerequisite for MATH 242 is both MATH 130 and MATH 241. Students planning to take both MATH 241 and 242 should take MATH 130 prior to entering the sequence.

MATH 241 APPLIED CALCULUS I (5)

Five lecture hours per week plus one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 120 or MATH 123 with a grade of C or better, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent.

Basic techniques of differential calculus. Selected topics from analytic geometry, limits, differentiation, and applications of the derivative. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B4). (CAN MATH 30; MATH 241 + MATH 242 = CAN MATH SEQ D).

MATH 242 APPLIED CALCULUS II (3)

Three lecture hours per week plus one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 130 and MATH 241 with grades of C or better, or equivalent.

Basic techniques of integral calculus. The definition, calculation, and application of the integral. Logarithmic and exponential functions. Partial derivatives, multiple integrals, differential equations, and Taylor Series. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B4). (CAN MATH 32; MATH 241 + MATH 242 = CAN MATH SEQ D).

MATH 251 CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 222 with a grade of C or better, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent.

The study of limits and continuity, the derivatives, applications of derivative, the definite integral, improper integrals, the conic sections. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B4). (CAN MATH 18; MATH 251 + MATH 252 = CAN MATH SEQ B).

MATH 252 CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 251 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.

The study of applications of the definite integral, vectors, trigonometric and exponential functions, techniques of integration, polar coordinates and parametric equations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B4). (CAN MATH 20; MATH 251 + MATH 252 = CAN MATH SEQ B).

MATH 253 CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY III

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 252 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.

The study of vector valued functions, sequences and series, Taylor's formula, multivariable functions, differential calculus of multivariable functions, and integral calculus of multivariable functions. Line and surface integrals and differential equations will be covered as time permits. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B4). (CAN MATH 22).

MATH 270 LINEAR ALGEBRA (3)

Three lecture hours per week plus one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 252 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.

The study of systems of linear equations, the algebra of matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, the algebra of linear transformations with an introduction to dual spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and the applications of vectors and matrices to linear equations and linear transformations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B4). (CAN MATH 26).

MATH 275 ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3)

Three lecture hours per week plus one hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 253 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.

Differential equations and applications of first and higher order with an emphasis on second order. Other topics may include series solutions about regular singular points, LaPlace transforms, operator techniques, and numerical methods of approximation. A course suitable for mathematics, physical science, and engineering students after they have completed the Calculus sequence. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B4). (CAN MATH 24).

MATH 650 MATHEMATICS SUPPLEMENT (.5-2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Twenty-four lab hours for each .5 unit.

Based on individual needs, students will have directed learning experiences to improve their mathematical skills which will promote mastery of skills necessary for success in college level mathematics and science courses. These supplementary lessons will be arranged and supervised in the Math Assistance Lab of The Learning Center. Class hours are devoted to work on specific content areas as prescribed for the individual student. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. (Open entry.) (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree).

MATH 805 FUNDAMENTALS OF MATHEMATICS I (2.5)

A minimum of 40 lecture hours plus 8 hours by arrangement.

Basic skills in mathematics, including whole numbers, decimals, an introduction to fractions, and limited geometry and statistics. Using these ideas and skills to solve real life word problems is emphasized. May be repeated once for credit. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree).

MATH 806 FUNDAMENTALS OF MATHEMATICS II (2.5)

A minimum of 40 lecture hours plus 8 hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 805 with a grade of C or better or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent.

Basic skills in mathematics, including whole numbers, decimals, fractions, percents, ratio and proportion, measurement, geometry, basic statistics, and an introduction to signed numbers and order of operations. Using these ideas and skills to solve real life word problems is emphasized. May be repeated once for credit. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree).

MATH 811 FUNDAMENTALS OF MATHEMATICS (3)

Five lecture hours per week.

Emphasis on basic skills in mathematics including operations on whole numbers and rational numbers. Applications of these operations will be stressed. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree).

MATH 815 BASIC MATH SKILLS LABORATORY (.5-1)

(Pass/No Pass.)

One class hour per week plus lab hours by arrangement.

Designed to make the mysteries of mathematical concepts more clear and understandable. Students will explore the basic concepts of mathematics by using concrete objects, graphs and group discussions. Workshops and by arrangement hours may be included. Should be taken concurrently with MATH 811. May be repeated twice for credit. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree).

MATH 819 MATHEMATICS DEVELOPMENT (3)

A minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 16 hours by arrangement.

This course prepares students for college-level Mathematics. Topics include whole numbers, decimals, fractions, percents, ratio and proportion, measurement, geometry, statistics, introductory symbolic manipulation, order of operations, and analytic methods for solving linear applications. Course emphasis will be on using these ideas and skills to solve problems from everyday life. Students will be required to complete individual and collaborative work with assignments both in-class and outside of class. Students will be required to use tutoring facilities for assignments as well. Note: This course does not replace any course in Skyline College's required course sequence based on placement testing. (Units do not count toward the Associate Degree).

MATH 879SA PATH TO STATISTICS (6)

Prereq: MATH 811, or appropriae score on District math placement test and other measures as appropriate.

An accelerated course to prepare students for transfer-level Statistics. It covers core concepts from elementary algebra, intermediate algebra, and descriptive statistics. Topics include ratios, rates, and proportional reasoning; arithmetic reasoning using fractions, decimals and percents; evaluating expressions, solving equations, analyzing algebraic forms to understand statistical measures; use of linear, quadratic, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic functions to model bivariate data; graphical and numerical descriptive statistics for quantitative and categorical data. This course is designed for students who do not want to major in fields such as math, science, computer science, and business. Note: This course is NOT intended for students who plan to study science, technology, engineering, math, as well as business and other non-STEM majors. Students are advised to meet with a counselor to discuss whether placement in this class in appropriate for their intended major.

MEDA 405 INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Students will develop skills and knowledge for processing, communicating, and examining electronic health records, billing and health information within various health organizations using an integrated computerized health information system. Topics include functional electronic health record systems, data entry, billing/coding/reimbursement procedures, scheduling appointments, report generation, and composing and examining/editing medical documents. Transfer credit: CSU.

MEDA 410 INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY (2)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Designed for allied health professionals. Includes recognition and identification of commonly used drugs; classification of drugs according to action; modes of administration of drugs; and care and storage of drugs according to regulations of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Transfer credit: CSU.

MEDA 415 LAW AND ETHICS FOR ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (2)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Legal relationships of physicians and patients, contractual agreements, professional liability, malpractice, medical practice acts, informed consent, and bio-ethical issues. Emphasis is placed on legal terms, professional attitudes, and the principles and basic concepts of ethics and laws involved in providing medical services for the allied health professional. Transfer credit: CSU.

MEDA 420 MEDICAL ANATOMY AND PATHOPHYSIOLOGY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

A comprehensive overview of anatomic function and the cause, transmission, symptoms and prevention of the twenty most common communicable and non-communicable diseases. Students will increase their awareness of common diseases in the healthcare industry. Transfer credit: CSU.

MEDA 450 INTRODUCTION TO CPT (CURRENT PROCEDURAL TERMINOLOGY) CODING (2)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Overview of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) coding that encompasses evaluation management, surgical, and primary care procedures performed in a medical office and emphasizes correct reimbursement procedures consistent with ICD codes. Transfer credit: CSU.

MEDA 455 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL STATISTICAL CLASSIFICATION OF DISEASES (ICD) CODING (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, BCM. 200, or equivalent; and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, MEDA 420 and MEDA 484, or equivalent.

Introduction to ICD focuses on a national classification of coding that encompasses diseases, ailments, injuries, and disorders for all the major and minor body systems. This course includes, but is not limited to, hospital inpatient, outpatient and ambulatory care coding emphasizing specific and correct procedures to accurately achieve maximum reimbursement. Transfer credit: CSU.

MEDA 460 INTRODUCTION TO ADMINISTRATIVE MEDICAL ASSISTING (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

An introductory course designed to provide students with an overview of medical office procedures. Students will learn how to prioritize patient and office situations; receive, register and schedule patients; organize and sustain medical records, medical billing, health insurance, business operations, human resource functions, and financial management. Transfer credit: CSU.

MEDA 484 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Designed to give students a basic background in medical terminology as used by medical transcriptionists, court reporters, law related occupations, and allied health occupations. The prefixes, roots, and suffixes of commonly used medical words are presented. Proper names of anatomical structures and their relationship to each other are covered by body system. Also listed as HSCI 484. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 100 FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.
Students will learn how to read music notes, rhythms, key signatures, scales and chords. Students will develop listening techniques and explore musical styles and aesthetics. Recital attendance may be required. Appropriate for the general student, this course partially fulfills General Education requirements for the Humanities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).


MUS. 105 MUSIC THEORY I (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 100, 301, 377 or 401, or equivalent. Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in MUS. 111.
Extended practice in and application of written music theory skills. Learn melodic, rhythmic and chord structures needed for performance, writing, understanding and developing strong musicianship. Projects may include composition, arrangements, transcriptions and/or orchestrations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).


MUS. 106 MUSIC THEORY II (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 105 or equivalent.
Incorporates and builds on concepts introduced in MUS. 105. Through four-part chorale writing, analysis and music composition, students continue studies in functional tonal harmony. Topics include non-dominant seventh chords, III and VII chords, diatonic sequences, applied chords, diatonic modulation, and formal analysis of binary and ternary forms. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 107 MUSIC THEORY III (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 106 or equivalent.
Incorporates and builds on concepts introduced in MUS. 106. Through four-part chorale writing, analysis and music composition, students continue studies in functional tonal harmony. Topics include: introduction to chromatic harmony; secondary/applied chords; modulation; borrowed chords; introduction to Neapolitan and augmented-sixth chords. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 108 MUSIC THEORY IV (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 107 or equivalent.
Incorporates and builds on concepts introduced in MUS. 107. Through four-part chorale writing, analysis and music composition, students study post-Romantic techniques such as borrowed chords and modal mixture, chromatic mediants, Neapolitan and augmented-sixth chords, 9th, 11th and 13th chords, altered chords and dominants. Through analysis and music composition, students study twentieth-century techniques such as: Impressionism, tone rows, set theory, pandiatonicism and polytonalism, and advanced approaches to meter and rhythm.  Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

MUS. 110 MUSIC THEORY I (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: MUS. 100,301, 377 or 401 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.

Extended practice in and application of written music theory skills. Learn melodic, rhythmic and chord structures needed for performance, writing, understanding and developing strong musicianship. Projects may include composition, arrangements, transcriptions and/or orchestrations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).


MUS. 111 MUSICIANSHIP I (1)

Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 100, 301, 377, or 401, or equivalent. Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in MUS. 105.
Extended practice and application of rhythmic, melodic and harmonic materials of Music Theory I through ear training, sight singing, analysis, and dictation skills. Topics include: tonality, meter, rhythmic and pitch notation, intervals, triads.  Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).


MUS. 112 MUSICIANSHIP II (1)

Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 111 or equivalent.
Incorporates and builds on concepts introduced in MUS. 111. Further development of ear training and sight singing skills. Topics include: sight singing of triads and seventh chords, second-layer subdivision, and harmonic dictation of diatonic progressions. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 113 MUSICIANSHIP III (1)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 112 or equivalent.
Incorporates and builds on concepts introduced in MUS. 112. Further development of ear training and sight singing skills. Topics include: triplets/duplets, syncopations, chromatic alterations, and modulation to closely-related keys.  Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 114 MUSICIANSHIP IV (1)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 113 or equivalent.
Incorporates and builds on concepts introduced in MUS. 113. Further development of ear training and sight singing skills. Topics include: advanced chromaticism including modulation to distantly-related keys, diatonic modes, non-diatonic and synthetic scales, pitch sets and tone rows, irregular beat division, polyrhythms, asymmetrical meters, mixed meters.  Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 115 MUSIC, ART AND IDEAS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
An integrated consideration of art and music as reflections of the philosophies and traditions of cultures. The understanding of the various elements common to the creative efforts of art and music are emphasized as a means to enhance and extend a student’s recognition, involvement, and ultimately, appreciation of these efforts. Diverse media are examined to demonstrate the realizations of ideas into works of art and music. Also listed as ART 115. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

MUS. 144 CONCERT ENJOYMENT (2)

(Pass/No Pass.)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or 105, or equivalent.

A music appreciation course in which live concerts will be attended. The concerts will be selected from a range of musical venues. One week a concert will be attended; the next week it will be critiqued. Group sales keep prices at a minimum. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU (C1).


MUS. 202 MUSIC APPRECIATION (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Topics addressed include aesthetics, the variety of ensembles, musical form and design, analysis of the creative process, and criteria for the evaluation of musical performances. Lectures are illustrated by live and recorded examples. Recital attendance may be required. Appropriate for the general student, this course partially fulfills General Education requirements for the Humanities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).


MUS. 204 MUSIC HISTORY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A guided tour through the history of music of Western Civilization with the aim of broadening and deepening student awareness and appreciation of changing modes of musical expression across the centuries. Covers Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Modern, and Popular music genres. Concert attendance may be required. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

MUS. 240 MUSIC OF THE AMERICAS (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or 105, or equivalent.

Survey of music of the Americas emphasizing the music of Latin America. Included are African, Latin, Native American, and European influences on American musical forms such as Jazz, Folk, and Popular music and how they intersect with the Classical music tradition. Concert attendance may be required. Partially fulfills General Education requirements for the Humanities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).


MUS. 250 WORLD MUSIC (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.  Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Survey of selected listening and readings from the music of India, China, Japan, Korea, Indonesia, Pacific Islands, Americas, Africa, and the Middle East. A variety of media, guest speakers/performers will be included. Required attendance at a live performance. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).


MUS. 275 HISTORY OF JAZZ (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Understanding and enjoying music by studying the historical development of jazz from a musical and sociological perspective. Topics include discussion of musical elements, vocal and instrumental ensembles, artistic values, and the role of jazz in our culture. Concert attendance may be required. Partially fulfills General Education requirements for the Humanities. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).


MUS. 276 HIP HOP: CULTURE AND POLITICS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Examination of all aspects of the culture and politics of Hip Hop through the lens of Urban Music. Influences from Funk and Jazz are covered. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1, C2).


MUS. 286 BUSINESS OF INDEPENDENT MUSIC (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Exploration of the business side of music industry. Appropriate for students looking to start careers in the music business such as musician, recording artist, artist manager and booking agent. Topics include booking gigs, promotions, publishing, copyright, social media and branding. Transfer credit: CSU.


MUS. 287.1 URBAN MUSIC ENSEMBLE I (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester.
This course is for the study, rehearsal, and public performance and recording of Urban Music, in particular Hip Hop Themed, original works of composition, as well as literature appropriate to the ensemble. Special emphasis is on the development of skills needed to perform within a musical performance ensemble. Different literature will be studied each semester. Choice of instrument will be based either on student’s identified major instrument or voice. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 287.2 URBAN MUSIC ENSEMBLE II (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 287.1 or equivalent.
This course is for the study, rehearsal, and public performance and recording of Urban Music, in particular Hip Hop-themed, original works of composition, as well as literature appropriate to the ensemble. Special emphasis is on the development of skills needed to perform at the advanced beginning level within the musical performance ensemble. Different literature will be studied each semester. Choice of instrument will be based either on student’s identified major instrument or voice. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 287.3 URBAN MUSIC ENSEMBLE III (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 287.2 or equivalent.
This course is for the study, rehearsal, and public performance and recording of Urban Music, in particular Hip Hop-themed, original works of composition, as well as literature appropriate to the ensemble. Special emphasis is on the development of skills needed to perform at the intermediate level within a musical performance ensemble. Different literature will be studied each semester. Choice of instrument will be based either on student’s identified major instrument or voice. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 287.4 URBAN MUSIC ENSEMBLE IV (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 287.3 or equivalent.
This course is for the study, rehearsal, and public performance and recording of Urban Music, in particular Hip Hop-themed, original works of composition, as well as literature appropriate to the ensemble. Special emphasis is on the development of skills needed to perform at the advanced intermediate level within a musical performance ensemble. Different literature will be studied each semester. Choice of instrument will be based either on student’s identified major instrument or voice. Transfer credit: CSU.


MUS. 290 INTRODUCTION TO MIDI (MUSICAL INSTRUMENT DIGITAL INTERFACE) MUSIC (2 or 3)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement/semester for 2 units; minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 32 lab hours by arrangement/semester for 3 units.
Introduction to the use and implementation of MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) musical instruments, including interfacing with computers and MIDI software. Ability to read music is desirable but not essential. Transfer credit: CSU.


MUS. 301 PIANO I (2)
Recommended MUS. 100 or equivalent.
Beginning piano with an emphasis on music reading, keyboard harmony, improvisation and keyboard technique. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

MUS. 302 PIANO II (2)

Prerequisite: MUS. 301 or demonstration of equivalent skill.

Continuation of Piano I with increased emphasis on sightreading, technique and piano literature. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 303 PIANO III (2)
Prerequisite: MUS. 302 or demonstration of equivalent skill.
Piano literature from Baroque, Classic, Romantic and 20th century; keyboard harmony and ensemble. Recital performance may be required. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 304 PIANO IV (2)

Prerequisite: MUS. 303 or demonstration of equivalent skill.
Piano literature from Baroque, Classic, Romantic and 20th century; keyboard harmony and ensemble. Recital performance may be required. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

MUS. 350 THE ART OF ROCK, RHYTHM & BLUES I (3)

Three lecture hours per week plus two lab hours per week by arrangement.

A beginning-intermediate performance course for singers, guitarists, bassists, drummers, keyboards and other instrumentalists interested in American contemporary music. Learn to organize a band and negotiate the many aspects of the music business. Students will participate in live performances by arrangement. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

MUS. 351 THE ART OF ROCK, RHYTHM & BLUES II (3)

Three lecture hours per week plus two lab hours per week by arrangement. Recommended: MUS. 350 or equivalent performance experience.

An intermediate-advanced performance course for singers, guitarists, bassists, drummers, keyboards and other instrumentalists interested in American contemporary music. Learn to organize a band and negotiate the many aspects of the music business. Students will participate in live performances by arrangement. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 355 VIOLIN/VIOLA I (2)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 48 hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: MUS. 100 or equivalent.
This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of playing the violin or viola. Students will learn proper posture and basic playing techniques through the practice of exercises and short pieces. Elements of music notation and music theory will be introduced. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 356 VIOLIN/VIOLA II (2)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 48 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 355 or equivalent, or by audition.
This course will introduce skills appropriate for the advancing beginner. Students will expand upon and strengthen skills (bowing and left hand technique) learned in MUS. 355. Musical expression, sight-reading, and ensemble skills will be introduced. Skills will be developed through exercises and short pieces. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 377 GUITAR I (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 48 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: MUS. 100 or equivalent.
Basic guitar instruction. Stringing, tuning, fingering, playing techniques, notation, chords and chord progressions, reading guitar music, strum techniques, fingerpicking, playing simple melodies, and accompaniment. Emphasis on popular and folk music literature. Introduction to music theory for the guitar and voice. Individual and group instruction. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 378 GUITAR II (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 48 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 377 or demonstrated equivalent skills.
Continuation of skills begun in MUS 377. Areas covered include barre-chords, CAGED chord/scale theory, blues scales, accompaniment techniques, and major and minor scale patterns. Emphasis on popular music literature. Intermediate music theory for the guitar. Individual and group instruction. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 379 GUITAR III (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 48 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: MUS 378 or demonstrated equivalent skills.
Intermediate/advanced guitar instruction. Principles of moveable chord and scale structure (CAGED), advanced strumming and fingerpicking patterns, advanced theory (scale, secondary dominants, and motif development), improvisation, arpeggios, and reading music. Emphasis on American music literature. Individual and group instruction.  Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 380 GUITAR IV (2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 48 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 379 or equivalent.
Continuation of the development of skills begun in MUS 379. Additional material includes motif development, improvising, three notes per string scales, blues techniques, counterpoint, walking bass, modern rhythmic techniques, and other advanced guitar techniques. Individual and group instruction. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

MUS. 383 GUITAR ENSEMBLE I (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Two lecture hours and one lab hour per week plus 3 hours by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: MUS 378 or equivalent.

A course for guitarists in techniques from Doo-Wop and Rhythm and Blues to Rock in a small ensemble. Students work extensively on these styles and within the application with the intention of public performance. Public performance required. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 383.1 GUITAR ENSEMBLE I (1) 
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester.
A course for guitarists in techniques from Doo-Wop, Rhythm and Blues, to Rock in a small ensemble at the beginning level. Students work extensively on these styles and within the application with the intention of public performance. Public performance required. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 383.2 GUITAR ENSEMBLE II (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 383.1 or equivalent.
A course for guitarists in techniques from Doo-Wop, Rhythm and Blues, to Rock in a small ensemble at the advanced beginning level. Students work extensively on these styles and within the application with the intention of public performance. Public performance required. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 383.3 GUITAR ENSEMBLE III (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 383.2 or equivalent.
A course for guitarists in techniques from Doo-Wop, Rhythm and Blues, to Rock in a small ensemble at the intermediate level. Students work extensively on these styles and within the application with the intention of public performance. Public performance required. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 383.4 GUITAR ENSEMBLE IV (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 383.3 or equivalent.
A course for guitarists in techniques from Doo-Wop, Rhythm and Blues, to Rock in a small ensemble at the advanced intermediate level. Students work extensively on these styles and within the application with the intention of public performance. Public performance required. Transfer credit: CSU.


MUS. 401, 402, 403, 404 VOICE I, II, III AND IV (2, 2, 2, 2)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 48 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: MUS. 401 – MUS. 100 or equivalent. Prerequisites: MUS. 402 – MUS. 401 or placement by audition; MUS. 403 – MUS. 402 or placement by audition; MUS. 404 – MUS. 403 or placement by audition. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 401 VOICE I
Training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills for the beginning singer. Content includes posture, breathing, tone production, music fundamentals, English diction, and performance preparation techniques.


MUS. 402 VOICE II
Continuation of training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills begun in MUS. 401 for the intermediate singer. Content includes refinement of posture, breathing, tone production, and performance preparation techniques. Further studies in music theory and language diction. Emphasis placed on song interpretation and vocal styles.


MUS. 403 VOICE III
Continuation of training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills begun in MUS. 401 and 402 for intermediate/advanced singers. Content includes refinement of posture, breathing, tone production, and performance preparation techniques. Further studies in music theory and language diction. Emphasis placed on song interpretation and vocal styles.


MUS. 404 VOICE IV
Continuation of training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills begun in MUS. 401, 402 and 403 for advanced singers. Content includes refinement of posture, breathing, tone production, and performance preparation techniques. Further studies in music theory and language diction. Emphasis placed on song interpretation and vocal styles.


MUS. 401, 402, 403, 404 VOICE I, II, III AND IV (2, 2, 2, 2)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 48 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: MUS. 401 – MUS. 100 or equivalent. Prerequisites: MUS. 402 – MUS. 401 or placement by audition; MUS. 403 – MUS. 402 or placement by audition; MUS. 404 – MUS. 403 or placement by audition. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 401 VOICE I
Training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills for the beginning singer. Content includes posture, breathing, tone production, music fundamentals, English diction, and performance preparation techniques.


MUS. 402 VOICE II
Continuation of training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills begun in MUS. 401 for the intermediate singer. Content includes refinement of posture, breathing, tone production, and performance preparation techniques. Further studies in music theory and language diction. Emphasis placed on song interpretation and vocal styles.


MUS. 403 VOICE III
Continuation of training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills begun in MUS. 401 and 402 for intermediate/advanced singers. Content includes refinement of posture, breathing, tone production, and performance preparation techniques. Further studies in music theory and language diction. Emphasis placed on song interpretation and vocal styles.


MUS. 404 VOICE IV
Continuation of training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills begun in MUS. 401, 402 and 403 for advanced singers. Content includes refinement of posture, breathing, tone production, and performance preparation techniques. Further studies in music theory and language diction. Emphasis placed on song interpretation and vocal styles.


MUS. 401, 402, 403, 404 VOICE I, II, III AND IV (2, 2, 2, 2)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 48 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: MUS. 401 – MUS. 100 or equivalent. Prerequisites: MUS. 402 – MUS. 401 or placement by audition; MUS. 403 – MUS. 402 or placement by audition; MUS. 404 – MUS. 403 or placement by audition. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 401 VOICE I
Training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills for the beginning singer. Content includes posture, breathing, tone production, music fundamentals, English diction, and performance preparation techniques.


MUS. 402 VOICE II
Continuation of training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills begun in MUS. 401 for the intermediate singer. Content includes refinement of posture, breathing, tone production, and performance preparation techniques. Further studies in music theory and language diction. Emphasis placed on song interpretation and vocal styles.


MUS. 403 VOICE III
Continuation of training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills begun in MUS. 401 and 402 for intermediate/advanced singers. Content includes refinement of posture, breathing, tone production, and performance preparation techniques. Further studies in music theory and language diction. Emphasis placed on song interpretation and vocal styles.


MUS. 404 VOICE IV
Continuation of training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills begun in MUS. 401, 402 and 403 for advanced singers. Content includes refinement of posture, breathing, tone production, and performance preparation techniques. Further studies in music theory and language diction. Emphasis placed on song interpretation and vocal styles.


MUS. 401, 402, 403, 404 VOICE I, II, III AND IV (2, 2, 2, 2)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 48 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Recommended: MUS. 401 – MUS. 100 or equivalent. Prerequisites: MUS. 402 – MUS. 401 or placement by audition; MUS. 403 – MUS. 402 or placement by audition; MUS. 404 – MUS. 403 or placement by audition. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 401 VOICE I
Training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills for the beginning singer. Content includes posture, breathing, tone production, music fundamentals, English diction, and performance preparation techniques.


MUS. 402 VOICE II
Continuation of training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills begun in MUS. 401 for the intermediate singer. Content includes refinement of posture, breathing, tone production, and performance preparation techniques. Further studies in music theory and language diction. Emphasis placed on song interpretation and vocal styles.


MUS. 403 VOICE III
Continuation of training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills begun in MUS. 401 and 402 for intermediate/advanced singers. Content includes refinement of posture, breathing, tone production, and performance preparation techniques. Further studies in music theory and language diction. Emphasis placed on song interpretation and vocal styles.


MUS. 404 VOICE IV
Continuation of training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills begun in MUS. 401, 402 and 403 for advanced singers. Content includes refinement of posture, breathing, tone production, and performance preparation techniques. Further studies in music theory and language diction. Emphasis placed on song interpretation and vocal styles.

MUS. 410.1 VOICE FOR THE MUSICAL THEATER PRODUCTION I (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester.
Beginning level theory and practice in vocal performance and theatrical production, designed to prepare students to perform in a musical theater production. Activities include learning vocal technique, acting technique, and song repertoire that will be utilized in performance. Lecture subjects include the historical context of the libretto and the musical style and song structure specific to the production. All levels of vocal skill are welcome. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 410.2 VOICE FOR THE MUSICAL THEATER PRODUCTION II (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 410.1 or equivalent.
Intermediate level theory and practice in vocal performance and theatrical production, designed to prepare students to perform in a musical theater production. Activities include learning vocal technique, acting technique, and song repertoire that will be utilized in performance. Lecture subjects include the historical context of the libretto and the musical style and song structure specific to the production. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 410.3 VOICE FOR THE MUSICAL THEATER PRODUCTION III (1)  
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 410.2 or equivalent.
Advanced intermediate level theory and practice in vocal performance and theatrical production, designed to prepare students to perform in a musical theater production. Activities include learning vocal technique, acting technique, and song repertoire that will be utilized in performance. Lecture subjects include the historical context of the libretto and the musical style and song structure specific to the production. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 410.4 VOICE FOR THE MUSICAL THEATER PRODUCTION IV (1)  
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours plus 16 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 410.3 or equivalent.
Advanced level theory and practice in vocal performance and theatrical production, designed to prepare students to perform in a musical theater production. Activities include learning vocal technique, acting technique, and song repertoire that will be utilized in performance. Lecture subjects include the historical context of the libretto and the musical style and song structure specific to the production. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 420 TRADITIONAL KULINTANG MUSIC (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Two lecture hours and one lab hour per week plus two lab hours per week by arrangement.

An introduction to the theory and performance of the traditional bronze gong music and dance of the Southern Philippines, including music and dance of the Maguindanao people of Cotabato, the Maranao people of the Lanao, the Tausug people of Sulu, and the Tiruray people of Upi. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 430 CONCERT BAND (.5 or 1 or 1.5 or 2 or 2.5 or 3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three or five class hours per week.

Study and performance of music for concert band. Performance is required. Open to all students of the College. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 430.1 CONCERT BAND I (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: MUS. 100 or equivalent.
Study and performance of music for concert band at the beginning level. Performance is required. Open to all students of the College. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 430.2 CONCERT BAND II (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 430.1 or equivalent.
Study and performance of music for concert band at the advanced beginning level. Performance is required. Open to all students of the College. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 430.3 CONCERT BAND III (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 430.2 or equivalent.
Study and performance of music for concert band at the advanced beginning level. Performance is required. Open to all students of the College. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 430.4 CONCERT BAND IV (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 430.3 or equivalent.
Study and performance of music for concert band at the advanced beginning level. Performance is required. Open to all students of the College. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 450 JAZZ BAND (1 or 2 or 3)

Three or five class hours per week.

Career course that includes organization, training, procedures, arranging, vocals and other phases of dance band work. Performance is required. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


MUS. 450.1 JAZZ BAND I (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: MUS. 100 or equivalent.
Study, performance, organization, arranging, vocals, and other phases of dance band work at the beginning level. Performance is required. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 450.2 JAZZ BAND II (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 450.1 or equivalent.
Study, performance, organization, arranging, vocals, and other phases of dance band work at the advanced beginning level. Performance is required. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 450.3 JAZZ BAND III (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 450.2 or equivalent.
Study, performance, organization, arranging, vocals, and other phases of dance band work at the intermediate level. Performance is required. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 450.4 JAZZ BAND IV (1) 
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 450.3 or equivalent.
Study, performance, organization, arranging, vocals, and other phases of dance band work at the advanced intermediate level. Performance is required. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 470 CONCERT CHOIR (2 or 3)

Eight lecture hours and four lab hours per .5 unit. Recommended: MUS. 100 or equivalent.

Performance of choral music for accompanied and/or unaccompanied choir. The choir may perform alone or in conjunction with other musical organizations on and off campus. Performance is required. (Open entry.) May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).


MUS 470.1 CONCERT CHOIR I (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Recommended: MUS. 100 or equivalent.
Performance of choral music for accompanied and/or unaccompanied choir at the beginning level. The choir may perform alone or in conjunction with other musical organizations on and off campus. Performance is required. Open to all students of the College. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 470.2 CONCERT CHOIR II (1)  
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 470.1 or equivalent.
Performance of choral music for accompanied and/or unaccompanied choir at the advanced beginning level. The choir may perform alone or in conjunction with other musical organizations on and off campus. Performance is required. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 470.4 CONCERT CHOIR IV (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 470.3 or equivalent.
Performance of choral music for accompanied and/or unaccompanied choir at the advanced intermediate level. The choir may perform alone or in conjunction with other musical organizations on and off campus. Performance is required. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 475 JAZZ CHOIR (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three class hours per week. Prerequisite: Vocal audition given by the instructor which includes vocalizing, sight-reading, and tonal memory.

Study and performance of contemporary vocal/choral music within the popular and jazz idioms. Students who play bass guitar, string bass, or drums are also welcome to enroll in this course. Performance is required. May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).

MUS. 485.3 VOCAL JAZZ ENSEMBLE III (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 485.2 or equivalent, or instructor approval. Recommended: MUS. 100, or equivalent. Performance of a wide range of vocal jazz and popular music repertoire for accompanied and/or a cappella jazz choir at the intermediate level with an emphasis on ensemble singing, vocal improvisation and jazz ballad interpretation. The choir may perform alone or in conjunction with other musical organizations on and off campus. Performance is required. Transfer credit: CSU.


MUS. 501 STUDIO LESSONS I (APPLIED MUSIC I) (1) 
Minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 7.5 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 304 or 358 or 380 or 404, or equivalent. Beginning undergraduate transfer-level performance ability (and equivalency) will be confirmed through placement audition. Corequisite: MUS. 105 or 106 or 107 or 108, and MUS. 111 or 112 or 113 or 114, or equivalent.
This course is individualized study of the appropriate beginning undergraduate transfer-level techniques and repertoire for the specific instrument or voice being studied. The emphasis is on the progressive development of skills needed for solo performance. Each week students will take a 30-minute individual lesson and complete appropriate practice hours. Achievement is evaluated through a juried performance. Designed for Music majors who are able to perform at college level. Enrollment eligibility determined by audition. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 502 STUDIO LESSONS II (APPLIED MUSIC II) (1)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 7.5 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 501 or equivalent. Corequisite: MUS. 105 or 106 or 107 or 108, and MUS. 111 or 112 or 113 or 114, or equivalent.
This course is individualized study of the appropriate advanced-beginning undergraduate transfer-level techniques and repertoire for the specific instrument or voice being studied. The emphasis is on the progressive development of skills needed for solo performance. Each week students will take a 30-minute individual lesson and complete appropriate practice hours. Achievement is evaluated through a juried performance. Designed for Music majors who are able to perform at college level. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 503 STUDIO LESSONS III (APPLIED MUSIC III) (1)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours plus 7.5 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 502 or equivalent. Corequisite: MUS. 105 or 106 or 107 or 108, and MUS. 111 or 112 or 113 or 114, or equivalent.
This course is individualized study of the appropriate intermediate undergraduate transfer-level techniques and repertoire for the specific instrument or voice being studied. The emphasis is on the progressive development of skills needed for solo performance. Each week students will take a 30-minute individual lesson and complete appropriate practice hours. Achievement is evaluated through a juried performance. Designed for Music majors who are able to perform at college level. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 504 STUDIO LESSONS IV (APPLIED MUSIC IV) (1)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours, plus 7.5 hours by arrangement/semester. Prerequisite: MUS. 503 or equivalent. Corequisite: MUS. 105 or 106 or 107 or 108, and MUS. 111 or 112 or 113 or 114, or equivalent.
This course is individualized study of the appropriate advanced-intermediate undergraduate transfer-level techniques and repertoire for the specific instrument or voice being studied. The emphasis is on the progressive development of skills needed for solo performance. Each week students will take a 30-minute individual lesson and complete appropriate practice hours. Achievement is evaluated through a juried performance. Designed for Music majors who are able to perform at college level. Transfer credit: CSU.


MUS. 665, 667 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MUSIC PERFORMANCE (.5-2 or .5 or 1 or 2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8-32 lecture hours and 8-32 lab hours/semester for variable unit sections; minimum of 8 lecture hours and 8-32 lab hours/semester for .5 unit; minimum of 16 lecture hours and 32 lab hours plus 16-48 lab hours by arrangement/semester for 1 unit; minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16-32 lab hours plus 16-48 lab hours by arrangement/semester for 2 units. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a beginning applied music course or demonstration of equivalent skill in the performance area.
Advanced study in specialized areas of the performing arts. Designed for vocalists, pianists, and instrumentalists, this course provides for extended in-depth study of both performance practice and performance art using selected themes as listed in the class schedule. (Open entry.) Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

MUS. 665S6 VIOLIN: SUZUKI METHOD Beginning violin or viola class using the Suzuki method. Students will learn to play pieces from several genres, including classical, folk and jazz. NOTE: Students provide their own instruments. Transfer: UC, CSU.
MUS, 667S1 CHAMBER MUSIC (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Prerequisite: Successful competion of a beginning applied music course or demonstratio of equivalant skill in the performance area..

Specialized chamber music instruction for instrumentalists with intermediate or advanced performance abilities. This course provides in-depth study and performance practice of selected chamber music repertoire. Transfer credit: CSU.

MUS. 667SA PIANO: ROMANTIC PERIOD 19th century original compositions. Transfer: UC; CSU.
CHOIR: TOMORROW WILL BE MY DANCING DAY Sing holiday music about dancing. Seasonal carols, partsongs, folksongs, and ballet music. Concerts will feature collaboration with costumed dancers. Culminating public performances required. Transfer: UC;CSU.
VOICE: THEATRICAL PRODUCTION Prepare and perform one-act musical in Skyline Theater in November. Culminating public performances required, including recital during finals period. Voice training or choral experience expected. Transfer: UC; CSU.
GUITAR: BLUES BACKUP The art of the shuffle. Basic and advanced guitar backups for Blues. Transfer: UC; CSU.
MORE PIANO CLASSICS (2)

Piano selections form Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn and Tchaikovsky for intermediate and advanced students. Transfer: UC; CSU.

MUS. 667SF GUITAR: STYLES OF MARK KNOPFLER Prerequisite: Successful completion of a beginning applied music course or demonstration of equivalent skill in the performance area. Guitar styles of Mark Knopfler. Rock style using fingers instead of a pick. Techniques and signature licks from “Sultans of Swing.” Transfer: CSU.
MUS. 667SG VOICE: I HEART NYC Prerequisite: Successful completion of a beginning applied music course or demonstration of equivalent skill in the performance area. Prepare and perform music from Broadway musicals set in New York City. Culminating public performances required. Voice training or choral experience expected. Transfer: UC; CSU.
MUS. 667SH SPRING CHORAL CONCERT Prerequisite: Successful completion of a beginning applied music course or demonstration of equivalent skill in the performance area. Prepare and perform choral works from classical to contemporary. Culminating public performances required. Voice training or choral experience expected. Transfer: CSU.
MUS. 667SI FROM JAZZ TO HIP HOP The correlation between jazz, blues, bebop, funk, rap and hip hop.Transfer: CSU.</>
MUS. 667SJ CHOIR: SEASON OF HOPE Prepare and perform uplifting choral music celebrating winter holidays. Includes traditional and contemporary carols. Culminating public performances required. Voice training and choral experiences expected. Transfer: UC; CSU.
MUS. 667SK VIOLIN II: SUZUKI METHOD Second class in violin/viola sequence building on skills developed in the first class. Students will work together in small chamber ensembles. Transfer: UC/CSU.
MUS. 667SL RIFFS FOR BLUES, JAZZ AND ROCK SOLOS (2.0) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Analysis of standard guitar licks and performance along with application. Must have intermediate level of playing Guitar III. Plus 48 studio hours by arrangement. Transfer: UC; CSU.
MUS. 667SV THE STUDY OF BEL CANTO SINGING (2.0)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Prerequisite: MUS. 401 or equivalent.

Training in vocal technique, musical expression and performance skills for the intermediate singer. Content includes refinement of posture, breathing, tone production, and performance preparation techniques. Further studies in diction. Emphasis placed on the study of Bel Canto Singing (beautiful singing) via the Italian Arie Antiche or Italian Arias of antiquity. Students will learn an aria or art song in the Italian language. Technical emphasis will be on obtaining a smooth legato line with a spinning vibrato. Students must incorporate a clear understanding of the text and be able to express it during performance as the true art of bel canto is closely allied to the words. This class is intended for intermediate and advanced students. Culminating performances required. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

MUS. 667SY CHOIR: GONE-A-MAYING (0.5-2.0)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours and 8 lab hours for each 0.5 unit.

Prepare and perform classical, folk, and popular choral music celebrating May Day, International Workers’ Day, and Cinco de Mayo. Culminating public performances required. Voice training or choral experience expected. Transfer credt: UC; CSU.</>

MUS. 667SZ BLUES GUITAR BACKUP TECHNIQUES (0.5)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) Minimum of eight lecture hours. Prerequisite: MUS. 377 or equivalent. Backing up for the blues beyond just simple chords - chord riffs and patterns for 12-bar blues shuffles. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

MUS 680SB: Violin/Viola I (2.0) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) A minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours by arrangement/semester. Introduction to the fundamentals of playing the violin or viola. Students will learn proper posture and basic playing techniques through the practice of exercises and short pieces. Elements of music notation and music theory will be introduced. Transfer credit: CSU.
MUS 680SC: Violin/Viola II (2.0) (Pass/No Pass or letter grade.) A minimum of 32 lecture hours and 16 lab hours by arrangement/semester.Prerequisite: MUS. 680SB or equivalent, or by audition. Introduction to the skills appropriate for the advancing beginner. Students will expand upon and strengthen skills (bowing and left hand technique) learned in MUS 680SB. Musical expression, sight-reading, and ensemble skills will be introduced. Skills will be developed through exercises and short pieces.Transfer credit: CSU.
OCEN 100 SURVEY OF OCEANOGRAPHY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Discussion of selected topics in oceanography designed to illustrate the scientific method and provide the student with a basic understanding of the nature of the world’s oceans. An introduction to the physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the sea. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1).
OCEN 101 OCEANOGRAPHY LABORATORY/FIELD STUDY (1)

Three laboratory/field hours per week. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in OCEN 100.

Introductory exercises in sediments, waves and sediment transport, bathymetry of ocean basins, materials of ocean crust and sea floor, ocean currents, tides, estuaries, physical and chemical properties of seawater, and forms and diversity of marine life. Field trips included. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B3).

P.E. 105 THE STUDENT-ATHLETE EXPERIENCE (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester.

A survey course examining the historical, sociological, health and compliance issues related to student athletes at the community college and university level. Topics include gender issues, racism, and performance-enhancing drug use in sports. Students will be able to cite community college eligibility requirements and matriculation requirements upon completion of this course. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E1).

P.E. 105 THE STUDENT-ATHLETE EXPERIENCE (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 32 lecture hours/semester.

A survey course examining the historical, sociological, health and compliance issues related to student athletes at the community college and university level. Topics include gender issues, racism, and performance-enhancing drug use in sports. Students will be able to cite community college eligibility requirements and matriculation requirements upon completion of this course. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (E1).

P.E. 152 THEORY OF SPORT AND FITNESS MANAGEMENT (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

An introductory course emphasizing basic management principles as they relate to the business of sport. In particular, this course will examine such topics as sport governance, facilities management, sports law, the economics of sport, and sports marketing. In addition, this course will provide an overview of the many careers available in the sports management industry. Transfer credit: CSU.

P.E. 152 THEORY OF SPORT AND FITNESS MANAGEMENT (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

An introductory course emphasizing basic management principles as they relate to the business of sport. In particular, this course will examine such topics as sport governance, facilities management, sports law, the economics of sport, and sports marketing. In addition, this course will provide an overview of the many careers available in the sports management industry. Transfer credit: CSU.

P.E. 203 (C) SPORTS MEDICINE CLINICAL INTERNSHIP (.5-4)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Thirty-two hours per .5 unit.

An in-depth practical learning experience within the sports medicine program. Students assist in injury prevention, emergency care, rehabilitation, and taping and bracing for varsity athletes under the supervision of the certified athletic trainer. Clinical hours are designed to assist in developing the skills required for NATA competencies. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. (Open entry.) May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

P.E. 203 (C) SPORTS MEDICINE CLINICAL INTERNSHIP (.5-4)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Thirty-two hours per .5 unit.

An in-depth practical learning experience within the sports medicine program. Students assist in injury prevention, emergency care, rehabilitation, and taping and bracing for varsity athletes under the supervision of the certified athletic trainer. Clinical hours are designed to assist in developing the skills required for NATA competencies. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. (Open entry.) May be repeated for credit a maximum of three times. Transfer credit: CSU.

P.E. 211(C) PREVENTION AND CARE OF ATHLETIC INJURIES (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Two lecture hours per week. Corequisite: P.E. 212.

Introduction to basic principles of prevention, assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Application of basic principles of anatomy, physiology, pathology and biomechanics to athletic injuries. Additional hands-on experience is available through the Sports Medicine Clinical Internship course. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

P.E. 211(C) PREVENTION AND CARE OF ATHLETIC INJURIES (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Two lecture hours per week. Corequisite: P.E. 212.

Introduction to basic principles of prevention, assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Application of basic principles of anatomy, physiology, pathology and biomechanics to athletic injuries. Additional hands-on experience is available through the Sports Medicine Clinical Internship course. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

P.E. 212 (C) PREVENTION AND CARE OF ATHLETIC INJURIES LAB (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, P.E. 211, or equivalent.

Introduction to basic clinical skills for the prevention, assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Instruction applies basic principles of anatomy, physiology, pathology and biomechanics to the prevention and care of athletic injuries. Additional hands-on experience is available through the Sports Medicine Clinical Internship course. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

P.E. 212 (C) PREVENTION AND CARE OF ATHLETIC INJURIES LAB (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, P.E. 211, or equivalent.

Introduction to basic clinical skills for the prevention, assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Instruction applies basic principles of anatomy, physiology, pathology and biomechanics to the prevention and care of athletic injuries. Additional hands-on experience is available through the Sports Medicine Clinical Internship course. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

P.E. 213 (C) SPORTS MEDICINE (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Two lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of P.E. 211 and P.E. 212, or equivalent. Corequisite: P.E. 214.

Intermediate to advanced level concepts of prevention, assessment and treatment of athletic injuries. Application of basic principles of anatomy, physiology, pathology and biomechanics to the prevention and care of athletic injuries. Additional hands-on experience is available through the Sports Medicine Clinical Internship course. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

P.E. 213 (C) SPORTS MEDICINE (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Two lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of P.E. 211 and P.E. 212, or equivalent. Corequisite: P.E. 214.

Intermediate to advanced level concepts of prevention, assessment and treatment of athletic injuries. Application of basic principles of anatomy, physiology, pathology and biomechanics to the prevention and care of athletic injuries. Additional hands-on experience is available through the Sports Medicine Clinical Internship course. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. May be repeated once for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

P.E. 214 (C) SPORTS MEDICINE LAB (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of P.E. 211 and P.E. 212, or equivalent; and satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, P.E. 213.

Intermediate to advanced level concepts of prevention, assessment and treatment of athletic injuries. Application of basic principles of anatomy, physiology, pathology and biomechanics to the prevention and care of athletic injuries. Additional hands-on experience is available through the Sports Medicine Clinical Internship course. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

P.E. 214 (C) SPORTS MEDICINE LAB (1)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of P.E. 211 and P.E. 212, or equivalent; and satisfactory completion (grade of C or better) of, or concurrent enrollment in, P.E. 213.

Intermediate to advanced level concepts of prevention, assessment and treatment of athletic injuries. Application of basic principles of anatomy, physiology, pathology and biomechanics to the prevention and care of athletic injuries. Additional hands-on experience is available through the Sports Medicine Clinical Internship course. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. May be repeated twice for credit. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.

P.E. 270 (C) INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN PERFORMANCE (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Two lecture hours per week.

Exploration of the broad spectrum of kinesiology and human performance as an academic discipline. Explores fundamental concepts and meaning of movement/physical activity, diversity of humans as moving things, professional/career options, current issues, personal characteristics/professional responsibilities, and human performance careers, and initiates professional portfolio development. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. Transfer credit: CSU (E1).

P.E. 270 (C) INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN PERFORMANCE (2)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Two lecture hours per week.

Exploration of the broad spectrum of kinesiology and human performance as an academic discipline. Explores fundamental concepts and meaning of movement/physical activity, diversity of humans as moving things, professional/career options, current issues, personal characteristics/professional responsibilities, and human performance careers, and initiates professional portfolio development. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. Transfer credit: CSU (E1).

P.E. 301 INTRODUCTION TO PERSONAL TRAINING (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Prepares students to take the National Council of Strength and Fitness Certified Personal Trainer Exam. Study of basic human anatomy, exercise physiology, health screening and assessment, nutrition, aerobic and anaerobic conditioning. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. Transfer credit: CSU.

P.E. 301 INTRODUCTION TO PERSONAL TRAINING (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 836 and READ 836, or ENGL 846, or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Prepares students to take the National Council of Strength and Fitness Certified Personal Trainer Exam. Study of basic human anatomy, exercise physiology, health screening and assessment, nutrition, aerobic and anaerobic conditioning. NOTE: This course is not activity-based and is not applicable to the specific area requirement in Physical Education for the Associate Degree. Transfer credit: CSU.


PHIL 100 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A survey of philosophical vies on fundamental questions concerning consciousness, reality, God, knowledge, free will, moral values, and political ideals. Incorporates an introduction to the methods of logic and critical thinking. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).


PHIL 103 CRITICAL THINKING (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement/semester.  Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An informal logic and language course that develops general learning skills, aids to understanding, creative problem-solving, effective communication, and processes of evaluation that are helpful to other areas of study. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (A3).

PHIL 109 CRITICAL THINKING AND WRITING (3)

Three lecture hours and one lab hour by arrangement per week. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or ENGL 105 with a grade of C or better.

Designed to develop critical thinking and writing skills. Presents techniques for analyzing, constructing and reconstructing deductive and inductive arguments as used in the social and natural sciences. Develops the ability to create and refine logically rigorous arguments in essay form, with particular emphasis on advanced techniques of writing. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (A3).


PHIL 160 HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY: ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.  Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
The history of ancient philosophy, the early Greek Philosopher through the Medieval Period. Special emphasis on the Pre- Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas. Topics include philosophy and religion, myth, science, and society. Transfer: UC; CSU (C2).


PHIL 175 HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY: 16TH-18TH CENTURY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.  Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
The history of Western Philosophy from Descartes through Kant, set in the context of the scientific revolution, the Protestant Reformation, and the emergence of modern political institutions. Specifics include Erasmus, Bacon, Pascal, Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume and Rousseau. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

PHIL 195 HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY: 19TH AND 20TH CENTURY (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or 105, or equivalent.

A survey of 19th and 20th century philosophy in its historical and cultural context. Examination of intellectual movements such as liberalism, positivism, Marxism, Darwinism, psychoanalysis, existentialism, and post-modernism. Critical reading of influential thinkers such as Hegel, Marx, J.S. Mill, Kierkegaard, Darwin, Nietzsche, Freud, Bertrand Russell, Wittgenstein, J.P. Sartre, J.J. Ayer, Quine, and Daniel Dennett. Transfer credit: CSU (C2).


PHIL 200 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement/semester.  Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent; and eligibility for MATH 120 or equivalent.
An introduction to symbolic logic with an emphasis on proof systems for propositional and predicate logic. Includes translation of English sentences into a symbolic language, patterns and techniques of deductive and inductive inference, and basic probability theory. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (A3).


PHIL 240 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.  Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A critical examination of philosophical views about ethics including accounts of human nature and human potential; theories of value, rightness and justice; ideals of character, personal aims, action, ways of living, and other topics. Contemporary moral issues will be explored in depth. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).


PHIL 280 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
An introduction to political philosophy. Readings and critical discussion of political philosophies (such as liberalism, conservatism, communitarianism, libertarianism, socialism, feminism, etc.) through readings by influential thinkers (such as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Mill, Marx, Rawls, and contemporary writers). Topics include theories of human nature, conceptions of justice, the relationship between the individual and the state, the distribution of wealth and power, the significance of ideology, and the role of markets. Also listed as PLSC 280. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).


PHIL 300 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD RELIGIONS (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
An exploration of the religions of the world, their origin, history, beliefs, practices, art, and rituals. Includes varieties of Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and other selected traditions. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).


PHIL 312 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
An introduction to philosophical thinking about religion, with an emphasis on issues central to traditional monotheism. This course teaches how to critically examine arguments concerning the origin of religion, the existence of God, the historicity of miracles, the veridicality of religious and mystical experience, the existence of spirits or souls, the possibility of life after death, the equal validity of all religions, and other topics. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

PHIL 320 ASIAN PHILOSOPHY (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100.

A general survey of the philosophical developments in India, China and Japan. Major philosophical theories of these countries will be compared and evaluated. The philosophical impact on Asian existence, human destiny, ethical and metaphysical views will be examined. Course includes an introduction to the challenges of comparative study. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

PHYS 105 CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: MATH 110 or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A conceptual introduction to physics intended to foster scientific understanding of the world. Stresses important and applicable topics in motion, force, oscillations, fluids, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, magnetism, light and modern physics. Some students may wish to use this course as extra preparation for algebra-based physics. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1).


PHYS 106 CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS LABORATORY (1)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Minimum of 48 lab hours/semester. Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 105. Recommended: Completion of MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent; and eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A laboratory exploration of physical phenomena covered in Conceptual Physics (PHYS 105) lecture. Intended to reinforce those topics through hands-on investigation and develop an understanding of the scientific method. May be taken concurrently with, or after completion of, PHYS 105. Transfer credit: CSU.

PHYS 114 SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS (4)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MATH 110, or MATH 111 and MATH 112, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A conceptual survey of physical science (physics and chemistry) intended for non-science majors at the General Education level. A general discussion of the scientific method and techniques will be followed by physics, chemistry, and integrated topics. The laboratory portion will cover a hands-on exploration of phenomena discussed in lecture. The physics component of the course will discuss motion, force, energy, electricity and magnetism, waves and light. The chemistry component of the course will focus on chemicals and reactions common in everyday life. Concepts relating to the nature and interactions of atoms, ions, and molecules will be presented. Students will also learn to use and evaluate information presented on product labels, in advertisement, and available through the internet. Also listed as CHEM 114. Transfer credit: CSU (B1, B3).
PHYS 210 GENERAL PHYSICS I (4)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: MATH 130, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent.
The first semester of a two-semester sequence of algebra/trigonometry-based physics. Designed for students majoring in certain fields of letters and science, and required of those planning to enter medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, optometry, agriculture or forestry. Covers mechanics, fluids, waves and thermodynamics. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).


PHYS 211 GENERAL PHYSICS I – CALCULUS SUPPLEMENT (1)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of MATH 242 or MATH 252, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent; and concurrent enrollment in or completion of PHYS 210 or equivalent.
Further depth and application of calculus to topics in PHYS 210. Examples include derivatives and integrals of equations of motion, work done by a variable force, and torque as a cross product. Required of some pre-medical, biology and architecture students. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


PHYS 220 GENERAL PHYSICS II (4)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: PHYS 210 or equivalent.
The second semester of a two-semester sequence of algebra/trigonometry-based physics. Designed for students majoring in certain fields of letters and science, and required of those planning to enter medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, optometry, agriculture or forestry. Covers electricity, magnetism, light and modern physics. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).


PHYS 221 GENERAL PHYSICS II – CALCULUS SUPPLEMENT (1)
Minimum of 16 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of MATH 242 or MATH 252, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent; and concurrent enrollment in or completion of PHYS 220 or equivalent.
Futher depth and application of calculus to topics in PHYS 220. Examples include surface integrals for Gauss’s Law, line integrals for Ampere’s Law, and classical wave equation. Required of some premedical, biology and architecture students. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


PHYS 250, 260, 270 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS I, II, III (4, 4, 4)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: PHYS 250 –MATH 251 and concurrent enrollment in or completion of MATH 252, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent; PHYS 260 – PHYS 250 and MATH 252, or equivalent. PHYS 270 – PHYS 250 and MATH 252, or equivalent.
This three-semester physics sequence is designed to give the student majoring in engineering, physics, or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics.

PHYS 250 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS I – The first semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics. Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics. Covers Newtonian mechanics, including gravitation and mechanical oscillations. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 260 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS II – The second semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics (may also be taken as the third semester). Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals pf physics. Covers electricity, magnetism and electromagnetic waves. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 270 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS III – The third semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics (may also be taken directly after PHYS 250). Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics. Covers fluids, thermodynamics, waves and light, and modern physics. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).


PHYS 250, 260, 270 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS I, II, III (4, 4, 4)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: PHYS 250 –MATH 251 and concurrent enrollment in or completion of MATH 252, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent; PHYS 260 – PHYS 250 and MATH 252, or equivalent. PHYS 270 – PHYS 250 and MATH 252, or equivalent.
This three-semester physics sequence is designed to give the student majoring in engineering, physics, or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics.

PHYS 250 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS I – The first semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics. Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics. Covers Newtonian mechanics, including gravitation and mechanical oscillations. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 260 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS II – The second semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics (may also be taken as the third semester). Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals pf physics. Covers electricity, magnetism and electromagnetic waves. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 270 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS III – The third semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics (may also be taken directly after PHYS 250). Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics. Covers fluids, thermodynamics, waves and light, and modern physics. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).


PHYS 250, 260, 270 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS I, II, III (4, 4, 4)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours and 48 lab hours/semester. Prerequisite: PHYS 250 –MATH 251 and concurrent enrollment in or completion of MATH 252, or appropriate placement test score and other measures as appropriate, or equivalent; PHYS 260 – PHYS 250 and MATH 252, or equivalent. PHYS 270 – PHYS 250 and MATH 252, or equivalent.
This three-semester physics sequence is designed to give the student majoring in engineering, physics, or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics.

PHYS 250 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS I – The first semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics. Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics. Covers Newtonian mechanics, including gravitation and mechanical oscillations. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 260 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS II – The second semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics (may also be taken as the third semester). Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals pf physics. Covers electricity, magnetism and electromagnetic waves. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).

PHYS 270 PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS III – The third semester of a three-semester sequence of calculus-based physics (may also be taken directly after PHYS 250). Designed to give students majoring in engineering, physics or chemistry a thorough foundation in the fundamentals of physics. Covers fluids, thermodynamics, waves and light, and modern physics. The laboratory portion covers measurement and analysis of phenomena discussed in lecture. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (B1, B3).


PLSC 115 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Comparative treatment of the government and politics of countries of Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and developing nations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


PLSC 115 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Comparative treatment of the government and politics of countries of Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and developing nations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


PLSC 130 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Survey of the basic elements of international relations, including the factors of sovereignty, nationalism, and national policies; the international struggle for power and order; the role of the United Nations and other supranational organizations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


PLSC 130 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Survey of the basic elements of international relations, including the factors of sovereignty, nationalism, and national policies; the international struggle for power and order; the role of the United Nations and other supranational organizations. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


PLSC 150 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL THEORY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.
Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Introduction to ways of thinking about politics and an exploration of the concepts of political theory. Political problems will be examined along with consideration of such ideas as political culture and ideology. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


PLSC 150 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL THEORY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.
Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.

Introduction to ways of thinking about politics and an exploration of the concepts of political theory. Political problems will be examined along with consideration of such ideas as political culture and ideology. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


PLSC 200 NATIONAL, STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
A study of the structure and function of the basic national, state and local government institutions. The course will examine the dynamics of the constitutional power relationship between the respective branches of government and the operational relationship between the national, state and local governments.  Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D2b).


PLSC 200 NATIONAL, STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
A study of the structure and function of the basic national, state and local government institutions. The course will examine the dynamics of the constitutional power relationship between the respective branches of government and the operational relationship between the national, state and local governments.  Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D2b).


PLSC 210 AMERICAN POLITICS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Partially satisfies the American History and Institutions requirement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
The study of the historical and constitutional development of the foundations of United States political institutions and the dynamics of the governmental decision-making process from the colonial era to the present. Examination of the various sources of political attitudes, roles and behaviors of political participants and ways political decisions are made by the different units of government.  Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D1).


PLSC 210 AMERICAN POLITICS (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Partially satisfies the American History and Institutions requirement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
The study of the historical and constitutional development of the foundations of United States political institutions and the dynamics of the governmental decision-making process from the colonial era to the present. Examination of the various sources of political attitudes, roles and behaviors of political participants and ways political decisions are made by the different units of government.  Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D1).


PLSC 280 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
An introduction to political philosophy. Readings and critical discussion of political philosophies (such as liberalism, conservatism, communitarianism, libertarianism, socialism, feminism, etc.) through readings by influential thinkers (such as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Mill, Marx, Rawls, and contemporary writers). Topics include theories of human nature, conceptions of justice, the relationship between the individual and the state, the distribution of wealth and power, the significance of ideology, and the role of markets.  Also listed as PHIL 280. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).


PLSC 280 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
An introduction to political philosophy. Readings and critical discussion of political philosophies (such as liberalism, conservatism, communitarianism, libertarianism, socialism, feminism, etc.) through readings by influential thinkers (such as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Mill, Marx, Rawls, and contemporary writers). Topics include theories of human nature, conceptions of justice, the relationship between the individual and the state, the distribution of wealth and power, the significance of ideology, and the role of markets.  Also listed as PHIL 280. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).


PLSC 301 CALIFORNIA STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Partially satisfies the American History and Institutions requirement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Examination of state and local governments and their relationship to each other. Among topics to be studied: population growth; initiative process; elections and campaigns; the legislature; the plural executive; California Judiciary; local governments – counties, cities, school districts and regional governments; growth and environmental policies; social programs; and cultural diversity issues.  Transfer credit: CSU (D2a).


PLSC 301 CALIFORNIA STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Partially satisfies the American History and Institutions requirement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Examination of state and local governments and their relationship to each other. Among topics to be studied: population growth; initiative process; elections and campaigns; the legislature; the plural executive; California Judiciary; local governments – counties, cities, school districts and regional governments; growth and environmental policies; social programs; and cultural diversity issues.  Transfer credit: CSU (D2a).

PLSC 315 INTRODUCTION TO REVOLUTIONARY THOUGHT (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

Examination of the major revolutions in history ' religious, political, technological, economic and gender based. The goals behind revolution will be identified and the reasons for success or failure will be discussed. Transfer credit: CSU (D3).

PLSC 315 INTRODUCTION TO REVOLUTIONARY THOUGHT (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

Examination of the major revolutions in history ' religious, political, technological, economic and gender based. The goals behind revolution will be identified and the reasons for success or failure will be discussed. Transfer credit: CSU (D3).

PLSC 320 LATIN AMERICA IN THE INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100.

This course explores Latin America's role in the international political economy. The role of colonialism; different political ideologies such as communism, socialism and Peronism; the availability of natural resources; trade policies of individual states; and relations to markets will be explored. Forecasts of the economic future of the area will be considered. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

PLSC 320 LATIN AMERICA IN THE INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (3)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100.

This course explores Latin America's role in the international political economy. The role of colonialism; different political ideologies such as communism, socialism and Peronism; the availability of natural resources; trade policies of individual states; and relations to markets will be explored. Forecasts of the economic future of the area will be considered. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

PLSC 330 MIDDLE EAST POLITICS: U.S. AND ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

A survey of political, religious, cultural and economic motivations that have resulted in the formation of the modern state of Israel. The role of the U.S. in the formation and the protection of the state of Israel. The Arab-Muslim nations' opposition to U.S. policies regarding the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).

PLSC 330 MIDDLE EAST POLITICS: U.S. AND ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT (3)

(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Three lecture hours per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.

A survey of political, religious, cultural and economic motivations that have resulted in the formation of the modern state of Israel. The role of the U.S. in the formation and the protection of the state of Israel. The Arab-Muslim nations' opposition to U.S. policies regarding the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


PLSC 335 HISTORY AND POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE EAST (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Examination of the historical, political, economic and social issues of the Middle East, including the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict and U.S. foreign policy in the area.  Also listed as HIST 335. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).


PLSC 335 HISTORY AND POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE EAST (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Examination of the historical, political, economic and social issues of the Middle East, including the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict and U.S. foreign policy in the area.  Also listed as HIST 335. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).


PSYC 100 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Introduction to the scientific study of animal and human behavior. Origins and assessment of individual differences in terms of learning, memory, thinking, intelligence, motivation, emotion, perception, and personality. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


PSYC 105 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: PSYC 100; and PSYC 171 or MATH 200 or BUS. 123, or equivalent.
Application of scientific methods to psychological research. Fundamentals of experimental design, descriptive and inferential statistics, scientific report writing. Exploration of psychology as a major study and as a profession. Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


PSYC 110 COURTSHIP, MARRIAGE AND FAMILY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
An introduction to the history and development of courtship, mate selection, marriage, personality adjustments in marriage, parenthood, family life, and divorce. Sociological, psychological, biological and anthropological perspectives are used to explain the complexities of the institution of marriage, communication patterns, and family traditions. Also listed as SOCI 110. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


PSYC 171 QUANTITATIVE REASONING IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: MATH 120 or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Introduction to psychological statistics and measurements essential to understanding statistical and quantitative arguments presented in news accounts, advertising, political campaigns, and popular treatment of psychological research. Transfer credit: CSU (B4).


PSYC 200 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
This survey course is designed to study the life span. It will examine how the individual changes physically, cognitively and psychologically from conception to death. Theoretical models, influences affecting development, and research relevant to development throughout life will be presented and discussed. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3, E1).


PSYC 201 CHILD DEVELOPMENT (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Examination of the major physical, psychosocial and cognitive/language developmental milestones for children, both typical and atypical, from conception through adolescence. Emphasis on interactions between maturational processes and environmental factors, While studying developmental theory and investigative research methodologies, students will observe children, evaluate individual differences, and analyze characteristics of development at various stages. Also listed as ECE. 201. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3, E1).


PSYC 238 ARAB CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Examination of how Arab culture shapes thought, feeling, and the development of personality. Survey topics in cultural psychology including culture and personality, child rearing, gender relations, identity, family structure and religion. Study of the core value systems associated with the etiquettes, beliefs and practices of Arab culture and influences on psychological development in the region. The course will also examine some non-native perspectives of these core values. Transfer credit: CSU.


PSYC 268 BLACK PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Introduction to and exploration of basic and alternative psychological theories and concepts that provide an understanding and appreciation of the psychodynamics of Black America. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


PSYC 300 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100.
An overview of how the individual thinks about, influences and relates to others. Topics include attitude formation and change, self-concept, prejudice and discrimination, interpersonal attraction, conformity and group processes. Other related concepts are included. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


PSYC 301 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Prerequisite: PSYC 100, or 108, or equivalent. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Study of the ways people adjust to their environments. Emphasis on the ways personality develops and changes. Review of techniques people may use to cope more effectively with stress associated with our complex society. Small group projects may be a part of this course. Transfer credit: CSU (D3).


PSYC 390 PSYCHOLOGY OF CONSCIOUSNESS (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
A survey of the concepts and characteristics of human consciousness. Topics include the dimensions of the normal waking state as well as altered states of consciousness (e.g., sleep and dreams, hypnosis, meditation, sensory reduction, psychoactive drugs, etc.). In addition, the relationship between the brain and consciousness, the distinction between the conscious and nonconscious mind, and other related concepts will be addressed. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


PSYC 410 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Examination of disorders listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Topics include personality disorders, depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, schizophrenia, and other related disorders. Symptoms, causes and treatments of each disorder are examined. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (D3).


PSYC 665 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (.5-2)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours for each .5 unit. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
Advanced, specialized study in psychology. Designed for psychology students and/or students interested in the social sciences, such as anthropology, history and philosophy. Topics will be generated by community, student and faculty interests. Field trips and off-campus investigations may require special planning by the student.  Transfer credit: UC; CSU.


R.E. 110 REAL ESTATE PRACTICE (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.
Real Estate Practice is the practical application of real estate skills in the field and office environments. This course presents the skills, knowledge and abilities needed to work with buyers, sellers, lessors and lessees to ensure success as a realtor. Completion of both R.E. 100 and R.E. 110 enables students to satisfy California state requirements for licensing. Transfer credit: CSU.


R.E. 130 CALIFORNIA MORTGAGE LOAN BROKERING AND LENDING (3)

Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester.
Study of the entire mortgage loan process from loan origination to underwriting, finishing with funding and servicing. The course also covers the marketing of oneself when entering the profession of mortgage loan brokering and lending. Additional topics covered include legal aspects of the business and various forms used within the profession. Transfer credit: CSU.

R.E. 665 SELECTED REAL ESTATE TOPICS (.5 or 1 or 1.5)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)

Minimum of 8 lecture hours for each .5 unit.
Course will focus on, explore, or introduce selected topics in real estate. Examples include topics such as changes in real estate law and contemporary real estate themes. By arrangement lab hours may be required for some topics.  Transfer credit: CSU.
R.E. 665SE ENERGY EFFICIENCY FOR REALTORS AND MORTGAGE PROFESSIONALS Content includes the fundamentals of ener