MLA Format

How to create MLA citations for a "Works Cited" list

Choose a topic from the tables below:

General Information  
BookseBooksBook review articles
Magazine articlesJournal articlesNewspaper articles
Articles from Periodicals (Magazines, Journals & Newspapers)Articles accessed from a Web database (e.g. Gale PowerSearch or Proquest databases) Articles for which an abstract is accessed from a Web database

Articles from Encyclopedias or Other Reference sources, including Online Reference Sources

Web Pages- Specific examples for different types of web pages: 
Web pageEntire website or Website homepageBlog page
Wikipedia page Personal web pageOnline book
Online book chapterArticle in an online journalArticle in an online magazine
Article from a newspaper websitePoem or short story from a websitePhotograph or other image from a website

E-mail messagesDigital FilesAudio Visual Materials
Video or MovieTelevision or Radio programSound Recording
Online Video Clip, e.g. YouTube videoWork of  ArtInterviews
Performances or Class LecturesUnpublished documents, including Class Handouts 

Putting Together the Works Cited List

For more detailed explanations of how to use the MLA format, you should consult one of the following:

  • The official MLA style manuals: MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (REF/LB2369.G53 2003) and MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (REF PN 147 G444 1998) (Ask a librarian to show you these guide books.)
  • The official MLA webpage: Frequently Asked Questions about MLA Style
  • Hacker, Diane and Barbara Fister. Research and Documentation in the Electronic Age . 2010. Bedford / St. Martin's. 1 Dec. 2003.
  • General Information

    • In a bibliography or "Works Cited" list, all citations are listed in alphabetical order, according to the last name of the author. If no author is listed, alphabetize by the first word in the title (ignoring "A", "An" or "The" at the beginning of a title).
    • In all cases, the citation begins with the author's name (last name first) whenever the author's name is listed.
    • If the author's name is not given, then the citation begins with the title of the work (book, article or other document).
    • Only the first author's name should be listed last name first. 
    • If there are two or three authors, the second and third authors' names are listed first name first, as shown in the book example below
    • For a work with more than 3 authors, list only the first author's name followed by a comma and the words et al. (also shown in the book example below.)
    • Book, magazine, journal and newspaper titles are always italicized.
    • Article titles are always put in "quotations".
    • Subtitles are designated by a colon (:).
    • All words in any titles (of books, articles or other documents) are capitalized, except the following parts of speech (when they are not the first word in a title or subtitle):
      • Articles (a, an, the)
      • Prepositions (e.g., in, of , to, against, between)
      • Coordinating conjunctions (and, but, for, nor, or, so, yet)
      • the to in infinitives (as in How to Play Chess)
    • Medium: All citations must include a word or phrase that describes the medium in which the source was accessed, read, viewed or heard. The word or phrase must be capitalized (but not italicized or in quotations.) The two most commonly cited media are Web or Print. Web includes any type of source--web page, audio, video, text--that was accessed on the Internet. Print includes any source that was read in the original print format, e.g. printed book, printed newspaper or magazine article. (Note: If you are citing a source, such as an old newspaper or magazine article, that originally appeared in print, but was accessed on the Web, the cited medium is Web, not Print.) For audio or video sources that were not accessed on the Web, indicate the specific medium in which you viewed or heard it, such as Radio, Television, CD, DVD, MP3, Film, Videocassette or Audiocassette.

     


    Citation Format for Books

    Books with a single author:

    Citation description: 

    Author's last name, First name Middle initial (if any). Title. Place of publication: Publisher, Year of publication. Medium of Publication.

    Citation example:

    Gamson, Joshua. R. Claims to Fame: Celebrity in Contemporary America. Berkeley: University of California Press,1994. Print.

    Books with two, three or more authors: 

    Citation description: 

    First author's last name, First name Middle initial (if any), and Second author's First name Middle initial (if any) Last name. Title. Place of publication: Publisher, Year of publication. Medium of Publication. 

    Note: For a book with three authors, list all three author's names. Only the first author's name should be listed last name first. For a book with more than 3 authors, list only the first author's name followed by a comma and the words et al.

    Citation examples:

    Stewart, David W., and David H. Furse. Effective Television Advertising: A Study of 1000 Commercials. Lexington: Lexington Books, 1986. Print.

    Jonson, Albert, Thomas Gray, and Jessie Muncy. Information Access. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992. Print.

    Baker, Nellie, et al. Book Publishing. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992. Print.

    Books with editor(s) rather than author(s):

    Citation description: 

    Editor's last name, First name Middle initial (if any), ed. Title. Place of publication: Year of publication. Medium of Publication.

    Citation example:

    Baughman, Cynthia, ed. Women on Ice: Feminist Essays on the Tonya Harding/Nancy Kerrigan Spectacle. New York: Routledge, 1995. Print.

    Essay, article, story, poem or chapter in a book with an editor (if the book is an anthology of works by multiple writers):

    Citation description: 

    Author's last name, First name Middle initial (if any). "Title of Chapter or Essay." Title of Book. Ed. Editor's first and last name. Place of publication: Publisher, Year of publication. Page numbers for the chapter. Medium of Publication.

    Citation example:

    Fox, Aaron A. "Split Subjectivity in Country Music and Honky-Tonk Discourse." All That Glitters: Country Music in America. Ed. George H. Lewis. Bowling Green, Ohio: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1993. 131-139. Print.  

    Essay, article, story, or poem in a book that is an anthology of works by a single author (If the specific literary work is part of an author's own collection, i.e. all of the works have the same author, then there will be no editor to reference):

    Citation description: 

    Author's last name, First name Middle initial (if any). "Title of Essay, Article, Story, or Poem." Title of Book. Place of publication: Publisher, Year of publication. Page numbers for the essay, article, story, or poem. Medium of Publication.

    Citation examples:

    Whitman, Walt. "I Sing the Body Electric." Selected Poems. New York: Dover, 1991. 12-19. Print.

    Carter, Angela. "The Tiger's Bride." Burning Your Boats: The Collected Stories. New York: Penguin, 1995. 154-69. Print.

    Citation Format for eBooks

    Citation description:

    Begin the entry in the works-cited list like the entry for a comparable printed work and end it with a designation of the medium of publication. The medium is the type of electronic file, such as Kindle file, Nook file, EPUB file, or PDF file. If you cannot identify the file type, use Digital file.

    Citation example:

    Rowley, Hazel. Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage. New York: Farrar, 2010. Kindle  file.


    Citation Format for Articles from Periodicals (Magazines, Journals & Newspapers)

    Magazine article (the following information is for paper copies of articles, see below for additional information required for articles from databases):

    Citation description: 

    Author's last name, First name Middle initial (if any). "Title of Article." Title of Magazine Day (if given) Month (abbreviated except May, June, and July) Year: Page numbers of article (if the article is not printed on consecutive pages, give the first page followed by a +). Medium of publication.

    Citation examples:

    Bazell, Robert. "Science and Society: Growth Industry." New Republic 15 Mar. 1993: 13-14. Print.

    Frank, Michael. "The Wild, Wild West." Architectural Digest June 1993: 180+. Print.

    Journal article (the following information is for paper copies of articles, see below for additional information required for articles from databases):

    Citation description: 

    Author's Last name, First name Middle initial (if any). "Title of article." Journal title Volume number. Issue number (if each issue number begins on page 1) (Date of publication): page numbers. Medium of publication.

    Citation example:

    Babrow, Austin S. "Student Motives for Watching Soap Operas." Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 31.3 (Summer 1997): 309-321. Print.

    Newspaper article (the following information is for paper copies of articles, see below for additional information required for articles from databases):

    Citation description: 

    Author's last name, First name Middle initial (if any). "Article Title." Title of Newspaper Day Month (abbreviated except May, June, and July) Year: Section and page number(s) (if the article is not printed on consecutive pages, just give the first page followed by +). Medium of publication.

    Citation example:

    MacKenzie, Bill. "Packin' the Heat." San Francisco Chronicle 4 Nov. 1993: A16+. Print.

    Book review article (the following information is for paper copies of articles, see below for additional information required for articles from databases):

    Citation description: 

    Reviewer's last name, First name Middle initial (if any). "Article Title." (if more than "Book Review" and/or title of the book) Rev. of Title of Book, by Book author's first name Middle initial (if any) Last name. Title of the Periodical Volume and/or date and page information for the appropriate type of periodical as shown above. If the full text of the article is accessed from an electronic database, include database information and access date as shown below. Medium of publication.

    Citation examples:

    Hendrickson, Donald. Rev. of The Case Against Immigration: The Moral, Economic Social and Environmental Reasons for Reducing United States Immigration Back to Traditional Levels, by Roy Howard Beck. Foreign Affairs 75.4 (July-August 1996): 146. Print.

    Fukuyama, Francis. "No Vacancy." Rev. of The Case Against Immigration: The Moral, Economic Social and Environmental Reasons for Reducing United States Immigration Back to Traditional Levels, by Roy Howard Beck. New York Times Book Review 1 Sept. 1996:18. Print.

    Article accessed from an online library periodical database (such as Gale, or Proquest web-based databases):

    Citation description:  Article information as shown above for magazine, journal or newspaper; then add: Title of Database. Name of database service or publisher. Medium of publication. Date of researcher's access. <URL (electronic address)>. (The URL is optional.)

    Citation examples:

    a. Popular magazine article from PowerSearch databases (click here to see actual article from the database):

    Adler, Jonathan H. "A Child's Garden of Misinformation." Consumers' Research Magazine Sept. 1993: 11+. General OneFile. Gale. Web. 8 May 2008.

    b1. Academic journal article from Proquest Psychology database (click here to see actual article from the database):

    Dodge, Brian, et. al. "Sexual Compulsivity Among Heterosexual College Students." The Journal of Sex Research 41.4 (Nov 2004): 343+. ProQuest Psychology Journals. Proquest. Web. 21 Nov. 2009.

    b2. Academic journal article from History In Context database (click here to see actual article from the database):

    Hoganson, Kristin. " ‘As Badly Off As The Filipinos’: U.S. Women's Suffragists and the Imperial Issue at the Turn of the Twentieth Century." Journal of Women's History13.2 (Summer 2001): 9+. U.S. History in Context . Gale.  Web. 21 Nov. 2009.

    c. Newspaper article from PowerSearch databases (click here to see actual article from the database):

    Nevius, C. W. "Homeless Remedy: Serve San Francisco First." San Francisco Chronicle 20 Dec. 2008: A1+. Student Resource Center - Gold. Gale. Web. 8 May 2010.

    d. A complete academic journal article reprinted in a collected volume from Literature Resource Center database (click here to see actual article from the database):

    McFarland, Ron. "Sherman Alexie's Polemical Stories." Studies in American Indian Literatures: The Journal of the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures. 9.4 (Winter 1997): 27-38. Rpt. in Short Story Criticism. Vol. 107. Detroit: Gale. Literature Resource Center. Gale. Web. 1 Dec. 2009.

    e. An excerpt from an academic journal article reprinted in a collected volume from Literature Resource Center database(click here to see actual article from the  database):

    Ullman, Leslie. "Betrayals and Boundaries: A Question of Balance." Kenyon Review. 15.3 (Summer 1993): 186. Excerpt in Contemporary Literary Criticism Select. Detroit: Gale. Literature Resource Center. Gale. Web. 1 Dec. 2008.

    f. Article from a book from the Opposing Viewpoints In Context database(click here to see actual article from the database):

    Lunneborg, Patricia. "An Unwanted Pregnancy Justifies an Abortion." Opposing Viewpoints: Abortion. Ed. Tamara L. Roleff. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 1997. Opposing Viewpoints In Context. Gale. Web. 21 Nov. 2008.

    g. Book review article from an academic journal from PowerSearch databases(click here to see actual article from the database):

    Forman, James, Jr. Rev. of Let's Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice, by Paul Butler. Michigan Law Review 108.6 (April 2010): 993+. General OneFile. Gale. Web. 21 Nov. 2010.

    Article for which only the abstract (summary) of the article is accessed from an online periodical database on the World Wide Web (such as Medline database on PubMed):

    Citation description: 

    Article information as shown above for magazine, journal or newspaper. Abstract. Title of Database. Name of database service or publisher. Medium of publication. Date of researcher's access. <URL (electronic address)> (The URL is optional. Also, because the length of the URL may sometimes be excessively long, the cited URL may be either the complete address for the web page of the full-text article or the basic address for accessing the database).

    Citation example:

    LeGrand, E. K. "Potential Risk of Enhancing Survival of Infected Cells." Journal of the American Veterinary Medicine Association 213.12 (15 Dec. 1998): 1698. Abstract. Medline. PubMed. Web. 18 Feb. 2006. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov>.


    Citation Format for Articles from Encyclopedias or Other Reference Sources, including Online Reference Sources

    Article from a Major Print Encyclopedia

    Citation description: 

    Author's last name, First name Middle initial (if any). [If no author listed, begin with article title.] "Title of Article: Subtitle of Article (if any)." Title of Encyclopedia or Other Reference Source. Year of Publication ed. Medium of publication.

    Citation example:

    Naisbitt, John, Thea K. Flaum and Oscar Handlin. "United States: Immigration." Encyclopaedia Britannica: Macropaedia. 1998 ed. Print.

    Article from a Non-Major Print Encyclopedia or Other Reference Source

    Citation description: 

    Author's last name, First name Middle initial (if any). [If no author listed, begin with article title.] "Title of Article: Subtitle of Article (if any)." Title of Encyclopedia or Other Reference Source. Ed. Encyclopedia Editor's name (if any). Edition (if not first edition). Number of volumes. Place of publication: Publisher, Year of publication. Medium of publication.

    Citation example:

    Helweg, Arthur W. "Immigration." Encyclopedia of Social Issues. Ed. John K. Roth. 6 vols. New York: Marshall Cavendish, 1997. Print.

    Article from an Online Encyclopedia or Other Online Reference Database

    Citation description: 

    Author's last name, First name Middle initial (if any). [If no author listed, begin with article title.] "Title of Article: Subtitle of Article (if any)." Title of Encyclopedia or Other Reference Source. Date of Publication or Latest Update. Publisher, Sponsoring Organization or Website name. Medium of publication. Day Month Year of researcher's visit. <URL (web address) of the page>.

    Citation example:

    Berthoff, Roland. "United States of America: The People: Colonial and National Immigration." Encyclopedia Americana. 2004. Grolier Online. Web. 29 Mar. 2007. <http://www.go.grolier.com/gol>.

    "Charles Dickens." Authors and Artists for Young Adults. Vol. 23. Gale Research, 1998. Biography Resource Center. 2004. Gale. Web. 26 Mar. 2007. <http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/BioRC>.


    Citation Format for World Wide Web Pages

    NOTE: The MLA format for online publications is not completely standardized. Various websites provide specific information on how to cite information from the Web according to their current interpretations of official citation formats.

    General web page format:

    Citation description:

  • Author or editor's last name (if an author is given), first name, middle initial (if any)
  • “Title of the Page.” (in quotation marks)
  • Title of the Overall Website (in italics)
  • Version or edition used
  • Publisher or sponsor of the site (if not given, use n.p.)
  • Date of publication (day, month, and year, as available). If not given, use n.d.
  • Medium of publication (Web)
  • Date of access (day, month, and year)
  • URL (optional – provide if it helps your reader locate the source or if your instructor requires it). Enclose the URL in angle brackets and end with a period.
  • NOTE : If you cannot locate any of the above components, leave it out.
    NOTE : Each of the above sections of your citation is followed by a period, except the publisher or sponsor, which is followed by a comma.
  • Citation example (basic web page):

    Brenner, Eric. "Citing Sources." Skyline College Library. Skyline College, 28 May 2008. Web. 3 Dec. 2009. <http://www.skylinecollege.edu/library/citingsources.php>.   

     

    Citation examples for specific types of Web sources:

    Web page:

    Barnes-Young, Christian. "Violent Media and Aggression." What They Play: The Family Guide to Video Games. What They Like, Inc., 2009. Web. 17 Nov. 2009. <http://www.whattheyplay.com/features/violent-media-and-aggression/>.

    “Thai Idioms.” Thai-language.com. Internet Resource for the Thai Language. n.p. n.d. Web. 17 Nov. 2009. <http://www.thai-language.com/id/589868>.

    "William Faulkner." William Faulkner on the Web. University of Mississippi , 6 Feb. 2003. Web. 20 Sept. 2007. http://www.mcsr.olemiss.edu/~egjbp/faulkner/ faulkner.html.

    Entire website or website homepage:

    NAIC Online. National Association of Inventors Corporation,. 9 Sept. 2008. Web. 1 Oct. 2009. <http://www.better-investing.org/>.

    U. S. Department of Education. US Dept. of Education, 21 Apr. 2007. Web. 1 Oct. 2009. <http://www.ed.gov/index.html>.

    The William Faulkner Society. William Faulkner Society, 5 Oct. 2003. Web. 1 Oct. 2009. <http://www.english.ufl.edu/faulkner/>.

    Blog:

    “SWC Teachers Suspended after Rally Participation.” Save Our Southwestern College . 23 Oct. 2009. Web. 17 Nov. 2009. <http://saveourswc.blogspot.com/2009/10/swc-teachers-suspended-after-rally.html>.

    Wikipedia page:

    "Skyline College ." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia . 7 Nov 2009. Web. 17 Nov. 2009. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.phptitle=Skyline_College&oldid=324537976

    Personal web page:

    Bell, Rosemary. Home page. Fall 2003. Web. 1 Oct. 2009. <http://www.smccd.net/accounts/bellro/>.

    Online book:

    An online book may be the electronic text of part or all of a printed book, or a book-length document available only on the Internet (e.g., a work of hyperfiction).

    Bird, Isabella L. A Lady's Life in the Rocky Mountains. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1881. Victorian Women Writers Project. Ed. Perry Willett. Indiana Univerity, 20 Apr. 1998. Web. 4 Oct. 2007. <http://www.indiana.edu/~letrs/vwwp/bird/rocky.html>.

    Online book chapter:

    Bryant, Peter J. "The Age of Mammals." Biodiversity and Conservation. University of California, Irvine, 2002. Web. 4 Oct. 2007. <http://darwin.bio.uci.edu/~sustain/bio65/lec02/b65lec02.htm>.

    Article in an online journal:

    Wysocki, Anne Frances. "Monitoring Order: Visual Desire, the Organization of Web Pages, and Teach the Rules of Design." Kairos: A Journal for Teachers of Writing in Webbed Environments 3.2 (Fall 1998). English Dept., Texas Tech University, Web. 21 Oct. 2007. <http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/3.2/features/wysocki/mOrder0.html>.

    Article in an online magazine:

    Fording, Laura. "Globalization and its Discontents." Newsweek MSNBC News, 1 Dec. 2003. Web. 1 Dec. 2007. <http://www.msnbc.com/news/999004.asp?0cv=KB20&cp1=1>.

    Newspaper article from a newspaper website:

    Author Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article." Name of Website. Sponsor/Publisher of Website, Date of last update. Web. Date of Access. <URL> (optional).

    Lattin, Don. "Religions Have Complicated Role in Globalization." SF Gate. San Francisco Chronicle, 23 February 2003. Web. 13 Nov. 2007. <http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/02/23/LV133895.DTL>.

    Bilmes, Linda J. and Joseph E. Stiglitz. "The Iraq War will Cost Us $3 Trillion, and Much More." Washingtonpost.com. Washington Post, 9 March 2008.Web. 27 May 2008. <http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/07/AR2008030702846.html>.  

    Poem or short story from a website:

    Collins, Billy. "More than a Woman." Poetry Magazine. Poetry Foundation. February 2002. Web. 5 Dec. 2011. <http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/browse/179/5#20605580>.

    Nesbit, Edith. "Marching Song." Ballads and Lyrics of Socialism. London, 1908. Victorian Women Writers Project. Ed. Perry Willett. Indiana University, May 2000. Web. 26 June 2007. <http://www.indiana.edu/~letrs/vwwp/nesbit/ballsoc.html#p9>.

    Photograph or other image from a website:

    "Alcatraz_island.jpg." PRBO Conservation Science. 2011. Web. 5 Dec. 2011. <http://www.prbo.org/cms/images/marine/Alcatraz/Alcatraz_island.jpg>. 

      

    Digital files

    Digital files are any documents, images or other media that exist in digital form, independent of a Web site.

    Citation description:

    Begin with information required for the source (such as a photograph, a report, a sound recording, or a radio program), following the guidelines for the specific source. Then for the medium, indicate the type of file: “JPEG file,” “PDF file,” “MP3 file,” and so on.

    Citation examples:

    Hine, Lewis W. Girl in Cherryville Mill. 1908. Prints and Photographs Div., Lib. of Cong. JPG file.

    “Scenes from a Recession.” This American Life. Narr. Ira Glass. NPR, 30 Mar. 2009. MP3 file.

    National Institute of Mental Health. What Rescue Workers Can Do. Washington: US Dept. of Health and Human Services, 2006. PDF file.

    E-Mail Messages

    Citation description: 

    Author of email. "Subject line of email." Email to (name of receiver). Date of email. 

    Citation example

    Librot, Janet. "How to Cite Information." E-mail to Josh Stuyvesant. 24 Nov. 2009.

    Citation Format for Audio/Video/Media

    Film or Video Recording

    Citation description:

    Title. Dir. Director’s First Name Last Name. Optionally you may add narr. (narrated by), perf. (performers), prod. (produced by), writ. (written by). Original release date, if relevant. Distributor, Year of current release. Medium.

    Citation examples:

    Bioterror. Dir. Kirk Wolfinger. Prod. and Writer, Matthew Collins. WGBH Education Foundation, 2002. Videocassette.

    Manufacturing Consent: Noam Chomsky and the Media. Dir. and Prod. Mark Achbar and Peter Wintonick. 1992. Zeitgeist Films, 2002. DVD.

    The Tuxedo. Dir. Kevin Donovan. Prod. John H. Williams, and Adam Schroeder. Perf. Jackie Chan and Jennifer Love Hewitt. DreamWorks, 2002. Film.

    Television or Radio Program

    Citation description:Title of specific program. Author, Director or Narrator. Title of Series. Producing company. Network. Broadcasting station (if from local station rather than directly from a network). Date of broadcast. Medium of reception (e.g., Radio , Television ).

    Citation example:

    "Cuba and Cocaine." Narr. Bill Moyers. Frontline . Documentary Consortium. PBS. WTVS, Miami. 18 Jan. 2002. Television.

    Sound Recording

    Citation description:

    Artist, performer, composer, or conductor depending on which person is most responsible for the production or who you wish to emphasize. "Title of song" (if specifying.) Title of the recording (or the titles of the works included). Artist or artists (when distinct from a first-listed person or group). Manufacturer, year of issue (if the year is unknown, write n.d. ). Medium.

    Citation examples:

    song from a compact disc:

    Coltrane, John. "Giant Steps." The Last Giant: The John Coltrane Anthology. Rhino, 1993. CD.

    No composer shown:

    Lewiston, David. Fiestas of Peru: Music of the High Andes. LP. Nonesuch Records, 1972. Audiocassette.

    Composer and performer different:

    Guthrie, Woody. Pete Seeger Sings Woody Guthrie. Perf. Pete Seeger. Audiocassette. Folkways, 1968. LP.

    Online Video Clip, e.g. YouTube video

    Citation description:

    Filmmaker's name, if available. Title. Date of the video itself. Title of Web site. Date the video was posted on the site. Medium of publication. Date of viewing. <URL.>

    Citation example:

    Sherman Alexie Speaks. 3 Nov. 2007. YouTube. 9 Nov. 2007. Web. 23 Apr. 2008. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwiQb8OQ6dY>.

    Work of art

    Citation description: 

    Artist’s name; the title of the artwork, italicized; the date of composition; the medium of composition (for instance, “Lithograph on paper,” “Photograph,” “Charcoal on paper”); and the institution and city in which the artwork is located. For artworks found online, omit the medium of composition and include the title of the Web site, the medium (“Web”), and your date of access.

    Citation examples: 

    Constable, John. Dedham Vale. 1802. Oil on canvas. Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

    Hessing, Valjean. Caddo Myth. 1976. Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha. Joslyn Art Museum. Web. 19 Apr. 2009.

    Advertisement

    Citation description: 

    Name the product or company being advertised, followed by the word “Advertisement.” Give publication information for the source in which the advertisement appears.

    Citation examples: 

    Truth by Calvin Klein. Advertisement. Vogue Dec. 2000: 95-98. Print.

    Arbella Insurance. Advertisement. Boston.com. NY Times, n.d. Web. 3 June 2009.

     

    Citation Format for Interviews

    Important: Always begin your citation with the name of the person interviewed.

    Interview you saw on television or heard on the radio

    Citation examples:

    Blackmun, Harry. Interview with Ted Koppel and Nina Totenberg. Nightline. ABC. WABC, New York . 5 Apr. 1994. Television.

    Nader, Ralph. Interview with Ray Suarez. Talk of the Nation. Natl. Public Radio. KQED, San Francisco , 16 Apr. 1998. Television.

    Interview you read in a magazine or newspaper

    Citation examples:

    Lansbury, Angela. "The Grand Woman of Mystery Reveals Her Own Mysteries." People 15 June 2002: 52-55. Print.

    Gordimer, Nadine. "Novelist Speaks of Life, Love, Travels." New York Times 10 Oct. 1991, late ed. : C25. Print.

    Interview that you conducted

    1) Name of the person interviewed; 2) The kind of interview (personal interview, telephone interview); 3) Date you conducted the interview

    Citation examples:

    Smith, Will. Personal interview. 22 July 2003.

    Spears, Britney. Telephone Interview. 10 Dec. 2002.

    Performance or Lecture

    Citation description:

    Speaker. “Title” or description. Sponsoring event or course name. Location. Performance date. Type of performance (Address, Lecture, Keynote speech, Reading)

    Citation example:

    Westfall, Jeff. Lecture on homelessness. English 100. Skyline College. 7 Mar. 2007. Lecture.

    Unpublished Document, Including Class Handout

    Unpublished document

    Citation description:

    Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Document." Description of document (e.g. flyer, leaflet, memo or handout). Organization associated with document. City of production/distribution. Date of document. (If no date listed, enter: n.d.) Medium. 

    Note: If any of the above information is not given, leave the information out.

    Citation example:

    Jackson, Boris. "Security Policy." Memo to college faculty. Brookfield State College. Brookfield, MN. n.d. Print.

    Class handout quoting another source

    Citation description:

    Author of quoted source. "Title of work from a published collection. (e.g. poem or article)." Title of Publication. (book or periodical). "Title of Handout." Handout. Title of course. (Name of instructor.) Name of school. Date of handout.  

    Note: If any of the above information is not given, leave the information out.

    Citation example:

    Aldiss, Brian. "Flight 063." Icarus Poems: A Selective Arachniography. Handout. Composition, Literature and Critical Thinking: English 110. (Professor Jeff Westfall.) Skyline College. Feb. 2006. Print.

    Putting Together the Works Cited List

    • The Works Cited list appears at the end of the paper on a separate page (or pages, if necesary). It lists the citations for all of the cited sources in alphabetical order according to the last name of the author. If no author is listed, alphabetize by the first word in the title (ignoring "A", "An" or "The" at the beginning of a title). Do not organize the citations by type of source.  
    • Put the title, "Works Cited", at the beginning of the list.  
    • In all cases, the citation begins with the author's name (last name first) whenever the author's name is listed. If the author's name is not given, the citation begins with the title of the work (book, article or other document).  
    • The first line of each citation is not indented, but each line of each citation after the first line is indented (the opposite of a typical paragraph).  
    • Skip a line between each citation.  
    • Book, magazine, journal and newspaper titles are always italicized .  
    • Article titles are always put in "quotations".  
    • Subtitles are preceded by a colon ( : ).  
    • All words in any titles (of books, articles or other documents) are capitalized , except the following parts of speech (when they are not the first word in a title or subtitle):
      • Articles ( a , an , the )
      • Prepositions (e.g., in , of , to , against , between )
      • Coordinating conjunctions ( and , but , for , nor , or , so , yet )
      • the to in infinitives (as in How to Play Chess )
      • See the example of a Works Cited list at the end of this Sample MLA Research Paper (pdf)

Share this page on: