Philosophy

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Explore great thinkers and ideas

Enroll in a Philosophy course at Skyline College for an enriching and challenging academic experience that focuses on exploring the great breadth of the human experience through the lens of philosophical problems or theories. The study of philosophy will give you the intellectual resources you need to better understand yourself, your world, and your society in addition to preparing you for a variety of careers.

student in class participates in a discussion

Philosophy studies the fundamental issues of justice, morality, knowledge, and reality through the exploration of great thinkers and ideas from a variety of movements and traditions.

To succeed in Philosophy, students will develop strong reading, writing, critical thinking and analytical skills, as well as demonstrate a passion for understanding broad humanity-spanning ideas from a variety of perspectives.

Career Outlook

A degree in Philosophy provides a broad base of knowledge that can be applied to a wide range of careers including teaching, government service, law, communications, journalism and more. The demand for jobs and the pay for these careers varies widely across the nation and the State of California.

The State of California Employment Development Department provides an online Occupational Guide that provides helpful job descriptions, job outlooks and wages, and qualification requirements for a wide variety of careers. Use this guide to find more information about a career that may interest you.

Looking for a list of classes offered this semester?

Check out the current class schedule.

All Courses

PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy (3 units)

A survey of philosophical ideas from a variety of traditions, ancient and modern, Western and non-Western, on fundamental questions regarding humanity and our relation to nature, knowledge and reality, moral values and political ideals, religion, consciousness, free will, and other topics. Incorporates the methods and practice of critical thinking.

PHIL 103 Critical Thinking (3 units)

Methods and standards for evaluating various types of beliefs, propositions, and arguments. Includes a study of the connections between language and logic, sources of bias, psychological and philosophical impediments to critical thinking, fallacies and errors of reasoning, explanatory arguments, and moral reasoning.

PHIL 160 History of Western Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval (3 units)

History of Western philosophy from ancient Greeks to late Medieval period, with emphasis on Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Epicureans, Stoics, Skeptics, and philosophers of Medieval Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Topics include origins and development of philosophy; methods of thought; and classical theories of reality, knowledge, justice, and ethics.

PHIL 200 Introduction to Logic (3 units)

An introduction to symbolic logic with an emphasis on proof systems (especially natural deduction) for truth-functional, propositional, and quantificational predicate logic. Includes techniques for the translation of English statements and arguments into a formal language, methods for determining the validity of arguments, and basic probability theory.

PHIL 240 Introduction to Ethics (3 units)

An introduction to moral theories and contemporary moral problems that explores philosophical views on topics including: human nature and human potential; virtues and duties; and criteria for evaluating persons and institutions. Moral theory will be applied to such problems as war, global poverty, distributive justice, euthanasia, abortion, and sustainability.

PHIL 280 Introduction to Political Philosophy (3 units)

A critical examination of political philosophies such as Liberalism, Conservatism, Communitarianism, Libertarianism, Socialism, Feminism, Marxism, etc. through readings by influential thinkers such as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Marx, Rawls, and contemporary writers. Topics include theories of human nature, conceptions of justice, the rights of individuals, the distribution of wealth and power, the significance of ideology, and the role of markets. Also listed as PLSC 280.

PHIL 300 Introduction to World Religions (3 units)

Comparative study of the origins, beliefs, practices, art, and rituals of the world’s major religious traditions: Zoroastrian, Jewish, Christian, Islamic, Hindu, Buddhist, Confucian, Taoist, and others. Includes examination of the role of religion in social life as well as the enduring philosophical issues (metaphysical and moral) that religious traditions grapple with.

PHIL 312 Introduction to Philosophy of Religion (3 units)

Philosophical thought about religion with an emphasis on issues central to traditional monotheism. Includes critical examination of ideas about the origin of religion, the existence of God, the problem of evil, the occurrence of miracles, the veridicality of mystical experience, the possibility of an afterlife, religious pluralism, and other topics.

PHIL 320 Asian Philosophy (3 units)

A survey of philosophical traditions of Asia with focus on the most influential thinkers and classical texts of Confucianism, Taoism, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Topics include human nature and social relations, moral values (such as humaneness, duty, and non-injury), theories of knowledge, and metaphysical notions (such as karma, nirvana, chi, and yin/yang).

PHIL B10 Medical Ethics (3 units)

Application of moral theory to a variety of problems in medicine and health care delivery, such as: uses of medical technology, allocation of resources, responsibilities and obligations of health care providers, medically assisted dying, genetic screening, abortion and reproductive rights, and experiments on human or animal subjects.

Program Type Total Units
Philosophy for Transfer AA-T 60 Units

Open to anyone interested in Philosophy! Contact skylinephilosophyclub@gmail.com for information.

Club Meetings: Fridays at 12:00pm

logo for Skyline Philosophy Club

Upon completion of the program, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate familiarity with the history of philosophical thought and contemporary currents in the discipline.
  • Assess influential claims and theories in the philosophical tradition using rigorous methods of critical thinking and logic.
  • Compose a reasoned essay that responds to a philosophical problem or that applies a philosophical theory to a contemporary issue. 
Office Information

Location: Building 1
Email: socialsci-creativearts@smccd.edu

Spring 2024 Courses

Type Status Title Days Time Instructor
Online Class IN
PROGRESS
PHIL 100 - 30684 - Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 100 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A survey of philosophical vies on fundamental questions concerning consciousness, reality, God, knowledge, free will, moral values, and political ideals. Incorporates an introduction to the methods of logic and critical thinking. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

TBA Colombetti, C
Online Class OPEN for Waitlist PHIL 100 - 35940 - Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 100 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A survey of philosophical vies on fundamental questions concerning consciousness, reality, God, knowledge, free will, moral values, and political ideals. Incorporates an introduction to the methods of logic and critical thinking. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

TBA Colombetti, C
Day Class   IN
PROGRESS
PHIL 100 - 42343 - Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 100 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A survey of philosophical vies on fundamental questions concerning consciousness, reality, God, knowledge, free will, moral values, and political ideals. Incorporates an introduction to the methods of logic and critical thinking. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

T Th 9:35am-10:50am Colombetti, C
Day Class   IN
PROGRESS
PHIL 103 - 39514 - Critical Thinking
PHIL 103 CRITICAL THINKING (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture/16-18lab hours by arrangement. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 846 or ESOL 400, or equivalent.
An informal logic and language course that develops general learning skills, aids to understanding, creative problem-solving, effective communication, and processes of evaluation that are helpful to other areas of study. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (A3).

T Th 11:10am-12:25pm Colombetti, C
Online Class IN
PROGRESS
PHIL 200 - 30689 - Introduction To Logic
PHIL 200 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent; and eligibility for MATH 120 or equivalent.
An introduction to symbolic logic with an emphasis on proof systems for propositional and predicate logic. Includes translation of English sentences into a symbolic language, patterns and techniques of deductive and inductive inference, and basic probability theory. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (A3).

TBA Colombetti, C
Online Class IN
PROGRESS
PHIL 240 - 41342 - Introduction to Ethics
PHIL 240 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
A critical examination of philosophical views - ancient and modern - concerning human nature and human potential; the fundamental concepts of goodness, rightness, and justice; the virtues of persons and social institutions; the relationship between the individual and society; criteria for moral evaluation; ideals of human action, ultimate aims (such as happiness), and ways of living. A variety of moral theories and contemporary moral issues will be explored in depth. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

TBA Zoughbie, A
Online Class IN
PROGRESS
PHIL 280 - 47746 - Intro to Political Philosophy
PHIL 280 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3)
(Pass/No Pass or letter grade.)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
An introduction to political philosophy. Readings and critical discussion of political philosophies (such as liberalism, conservatism, communitarianism, libertarianism, socialism, feminism, etc.) through readings by influential thinkers (such as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Mill, Marx, Rawls, and contemporary writers). Topics include theories of human nature, conceptions of justice, the relationship between the individual and the state, the distribution of wealth and power, the significance of ideology, and the role of markets. Also listed as PLSC 280. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2, D3).

TBA Raskin, J
Online Class IN
PROGRESS
PHIL 300 - 48146 - Intro to World Religions
PHIL 300 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD RELIGIONS (3)
Hours/semester: 48-54 lecture. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Exploration of the origins, beliefs, practices, art and rituals of major religious traditions (including Zoroastrian, Jewish, Christian, Islamic, Hindu, Buddhist, Confucian, Taoist, and others). It also examines the role of religion in everyday life, as well as the enduring philosophical issues with which religious traditions grapple. Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C2).

TBA Zoughbie, A

Explore Philosophy

For beginning Philosophy Students:


For advanced Philosophy Students:

Primary Contact

Social Science Creative Arts
Social Science Creative Arts (Account for Social Sci/Creative Arts)
Social Science|Creative Arts-Division Office
socialsci-creativearts@smccd.edu
More details »

Philosophy Faculty

Carlos Colombetti
Carlos Colombetti (Professor)
Social Science|Creative Arts-Philosophy
colombetti@smccd.edu More details »

Dean & Division Assistant

Danni Redding Lapuz
Danni Redding Lapuz (Dean)
Social Science|Creative Arts-Division Office
reddinglapuzd@smccd.edu More details »
Angelica Mendoza
Angelica Mendoza (Executive Assistant)
Student Services-Vice President, Student Services
mendozaa@smccd.edu More details »